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Rapid method of estimating lime requirements of acid soils of California

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Authors

P. F. Pratt, University of California
F. L. Bair, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(1):13-13.

Published January 01, 1961

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Abstract

The majority of soils in California are alkaline or, at least, not sufficiently acid to need lime. However, there are areas in the state where soils are naturally acid and other areas where continued use of ammonium fertilizers has produced acid conditions. The acidity of some of the soils is sufficient—pH values less than 5—to indicate that many crops should give higher yields when limed.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1305.

Rapid method of estimating lime requirements of acid soils of California

P. F. Pratt, F. L. Bair
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Rapid method of estimating lime requirements of acid soils of California

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

P. F. Pratt, University of California
F. L. Bair, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(1):13-13.

Published January 01, 1961

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The majority of soils in California are alkaline or, at least, not sufficiently acid to need lime. However, there are areas in the state where soils are naturally acid and other areas where continued use of ammonium fertilizers has produced acid conditions. The acidity of some of the soils is sufficient—pH values less than 5—to indicate that many crops should give higher yields when limed.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1305.


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