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Effect of surrounding terrain on spring temperature inversions in the Sacramento fruit-frost district

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Authors

Todd V. Crawford, University of California
Joseph H. Ganser, United States Weather Bureau

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(2):7-9.

Published February 01, 1961

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Abstract

Temperature inversion, probably the most important meteorological factor in frost protection in the Sacramento Valley fruit producing area, is under continuing study initiated in 1956.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 400-U.

Data for the above reported study were collected by growers in whose orchards the measuring instruments were located, by Farm Advisors in those counties, and by personnel of the Agricultural Engineering Department, University of California, Davis.

Effect of surrounding terrain on spring temperature inversions in the Sacramento fruit-frost district

Todd V. Crawford, Joseph H. Ganser
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Effect of surrounding terrain on spring temperature inversions in the Sacramento fruit-frost district

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Todd V. Crawford, University of California
Joseph H. Ganser, United States Weather Bureau

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(2):7-9.

Published February 01, 1961

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Temperature inversion, probably the most important meteorological factor in frost protection in the Sacramento Valley fruit producing area, is under continuing study initiated in 1956.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 400-U.

Data for the above reported study were collected by growers in whose orchards the measuring instruments were located, by Farm Advisors in those counties, and by personnel of the Agricultural Engineering Department, University of California, Davis.


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