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California Agriculture, Vol. 47, No.4

How nurseries can limit pesticide use
Cover:  Customers select purchases at a UC Davis Arboretum plant sale. Research showed that insecticide use in the nursery could be reduced without significantly affecting ornamental plant quality or sales. Photo by Jack Kelly Clark
July-August 1993
Volume 47, Number 4

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

IPM reduces pesticide use in the nursery
by Mary Louise Flint, Steve H. Dreistadt, Ellen M. Zagory, Robin Rosetta
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some pest control practices in the nursery may be unnecessary, according to a UC Davis Arboretum study.
Regular monitoring by a well-trained pest manager can reduce insecticide use in the nursery without reducing ornamental plant quality. Complete control of pests is not required to sell certain plants. A case in point is a plant sale at the UC Davis Arboretum, where customers ignored or did not recognize some types of pest damage.
With a ban on burning, incorporating rice straw into soil may become disposal option for growers
by Steven C. Blank, Karen Jetter, Carl M. Wick, John F. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Research reveals widely varying costs associated with different methods of rice straw disposal.
The traditional burning of rice straw, after harvesting rice, is being phased out in California's Sacramento Valley under a 1991 state law, and rice growers are faced with seeking other ways of disposal. One option, incorporating rice straw into the soll, will require farmers to carefully evaluate the methods available to them, given their equipment holdings. In general, growers will incur much higher costs to incorporate rice straw, compared with burning it.
Treeshelters for nursery plants may increase growth, be cost effective
by Pavel Svihra, David W. Burger, Richard Harris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Treeshelters fostered height increases for both container-grown ornamentals and transplanted redwood seedlings.
We tested the efficacy of tree-shelters on selected container-grown trees in the nursery and on redwood seedlings transplanted into the landscape. Treeshelters accelerated shoot growth of southern magnolia, holly oak and deodar cedar, but root growth was reduced during the first growing season as compared to the controls. Sufficient shoot-root development of the trees was achieved only after two growing seasons. One-year-old redwood seedlings successfully established themselves whether grown in treeshelters or not, while receiving 1/7 to 1/14 as much water as they would in a nursery bed grown in one-gallon containers. The seedlings in treeshelters grew significantly taller.
Preliminary study on harsh site offers hope for blue oak regeneration
by Richard D. Standiford, Donald L. Appleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Long-term studies indicate that blue oak can be regenerated at low cost.
Blue oaks were planted on a Tuolumne County hardwood rangeland site to assess low-input, low-cost regeneration technology on seedling establishment. After three growing seasons, approximately 22% of the planting spots had a surviving seedling. Costs ranged from $1.88 to $32.58 per surviving tree.
Farmers increase hiring through labor contractors
by Philip L. Martin, Gregory P. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although increased use of contractors has held down labor costs, contractor abuses seem to be rising.
Farm wages in California, as a percentage of farm sales, fell slightly during the 1980s, partly because many farmers switched to hiring workers through Farm Labor Contractors (FLCs). The abuses frequently attributed to FLCs — including underpayment or nonpayment of wages and (over)charges for housing, transportation and work equipment — have renewed legislative interest in regulating their activities.
New test reveals early diapause in pink bollworm
by Thomas A. Miller, Mohamed Salama, Richard C. Weddle, Saku Sivasupramaniam
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
With whitefly-associated cotton defoliation, a new test for early diapause in pink bollworm gains added importance.
Through basic research into genetic control of pink bollworm development, we devised a rapid immunological method of determining diapause in pink bollworm larvae — formerly a monthlong process which now requires only 24 hours. This new “ELISA” method has revealed that the pink bollworm larvae in the Imperial Valley sometimes enter diapause weeks ahead of the expected September date for diapause induction. The earliness of diapause induction is correlated with the severity of stress on the cotton plant caused by whitefly infestations.
Growing a world class institution
by Ann Foley Scheuring
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Agricultural research has followed a dynamic course during the last 125 years.
From its earliest days until now, University of California agricultural scientists have helped to shape and develop California agriculture. As society has changed, university research has continually expanded and diversified. Today's challenges are more complex than ever, but university researchers continue their long tradition of productive service.
Feats of UC science that changed daily life
by Editors
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Division scientists have charted a wide range of research “firsts.”
Everyday, Californians benefit from 125 years of landmark research performed in the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. As the Division celebrates its 125th anniversary, we offer as tribute a list of research feats that enhance daily life.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

“Data highway” new route to DANR clientele
by Michael S. Reid
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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California Agriculture, Vol. 47, No.4

How nurseries can limit pesticide use
Cover:  Customers select purchases at a UC Davis Arboretum plant sale. Research showed that insecticide use in the nursery could be reduced without significantly affecting ornamental plant quality or sales. Photo by Jack Kelly Clark
July-August 1993
Volume 47, Number 4

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

IPM reduces pesticide use in the nursery
by Mary Louise Flint, Steve H. Dreistadt, Ellen M. Zagory, Robin Rosetta
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some pest control practices in the nursery may be unnecessary, according to a UC Davis Arboretum study.
Regular monitoring by a well-trained pest manager can reduce insecticide use in the nursery without reducing ornamental plant quality. Complete control of pests is not required to sell certain plants. A case in point is a plant sale at the UC Davis Arboretum, where customers ignored or did not recognize some types of pest damage.
With a ban on burning, incorporating rice straw into soil may become disposal option for growers
by Steven C. Blank, Karen Jetter, Carl M. Wick, John F. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Research reveals widely varying costs associated with different methods of rice straw disposal.
The traditional burning of rice straw, after harvesting rice, is being phased out in California's Sacramento Valley under a 1991 state law, and rice growers are faced with seeking other ways of disposal. One option, incorporating rice straw into the soll, will require farmers to carefully evaluate the methods available to them, given their equipment holdings. In general, growers will incur much higher costs to incorporate rice straw, compared with burning it.
Treeshelters for nursery plants may increase growth, be cost effective
by Pavel Svihra, David W. Burger, Richard Harris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Treeshelters fostered height increases for both container-grown ornamentals and transplanted redwood seedlings.
We tested the efficacy of tree-shelters on selected container-grown trees in the nursery and on redwood seedlings transplanted into the landscape. Treeshelters accelerated shoot growth of southern magnolia, holly oak and deodar cedar, but root growth was reduced during the first growing season as compared to the controls. Sufficient shoot-root development of the trees was achieved only after two growing seasons. One-year-old redwood seedlings successfully established themselves whether grown in treeshelters or not, while receiving 1/7 to 1/14 as much water as they would in a nursery bed grown in one-gallon containers. The seedlings in treeshelters grew significantly taller.
Preliminary study on harsh site offers hope for blue oak regeneration
by Richard D. Standiford, Donald L. Appleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Long-term studies indicate that blue oak can be regenerated at low cost.
Blue oaks were planted on a Tuolumne County hardwood rangeland site to assess low-input, low-cost regeneration technology on seedling establishment. After three growing seasons, approximately 22% of the planting spots had a surviving seedling. Costs ranged from $1.88 to $32.58 per surviving tree.
Farmers increase hiring through labor contractors
by Philip L. Martin, Gregory P. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although increased use of contractors has held down labor costs, contractor abuses seem to be rising.
Farm wages in California, as a percentage of farm sales, fell slightly during the 1980s, partly because many farmers switched to hiring workers through Farm Labor Contractors (FLCs). The abuses frequently attributed to FLCs — including underpayment or nonpayment of wages and (over)charges for housing, transportation and work equipment — have renewed legislative interest in regulating their activities.
New test reveals early diapause in pink bollworm
by Thomas A. Miller, Mohamed Salama, Richard C. Weddle, Saku Sivasupramaniam
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
With whitefly-associated cotton defoliation, a new test for early diapause in pink bollworm gains added importance.
Through basic research into genetic control of pink bollworm development, we devised a rapid immunological method of determining diapause in pink bollworm larvae — formerly a monthlong process which now requires only 24 hours. This new “ELISA” method has revealed that the pink bollworm larvae in the Imperial Valley sometimes enter diapause weeks ahead of the expected September date for diapause induction. The earliness of diapause induction is correlated with the severity of stress on the cotton plant caused by whitefly infestations.
Growing a world class institution
by Ann Foley Scheuring
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Agricultural research has followed a dynamic course during the last 125 years.
From its earliest days until now, University of California agricultural scientists have helped to shape and develop California agriculture. As society has changed, university research has continually expanded and diversified. Today's challenges are more complex than ever, but university researchers continue their long tradition of productive service.
Feats of UC science that changed daily life
by Editors
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Division scientists have charted a wide range of research “firsts.”
Everyday, Californians benefit from 125 years of landmark research performed in the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. As the Division celebrates its 125th anniversary, we offer as tribute a list of research feats that enhance daily life.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

“Data highway” new route to DANR clientele
by Michael S. Reid
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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