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Rebuilding for the next 100 years

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Authors

Barbara H. Allen-Diaz , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 68(1):6-7. DOI: 10.3733/ca.v068n01p6.

Published online January 01, 2014

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In 2014 our nation commemorates the 100th anniversary of the founding of Cooperative Extension. For the University of California's Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR), this is both a year for celebration and for renewal.

As California's land-grant research university, UC, in 1914, was given the task of building the Extension system that the Smith-Lever Act envisioned would propel U.S. agriculture into the modern era. UC ANR embraced that vision with a prophetic belief that scientific knowledge could, indeed, transform California into the world's most successful agricultural producer.

For 100 years, UC Cooperative Extension has served as ANR's “community ambassador,” delivering research and education programs in every California county. During this centennial year, we have much to celebrate, thanks to our storied history and the 1,350 dedicated individuals who make UC Cooperative Extension and all of ANR thrive.

UC ANR researcher checking codling moth trap in a walnut tree at sunrise

UC ANR researcher checking codling moth trap in a walnut tree at sunrise

Today, we operate nine Research and Extension Centers, 60 county offices and three administrative centers, with more than 11,000 acres, 320 Extension researchers and 650 campus-based academics devoted to sustaining and improving California's agricultural and natural resources.

Through this vast statewide network, ANR delivers practical, science-based information to California growers, ranchers, decision makers and, perhaps most importantly, the people of California.

Through our partnerships with the agricultural community; state, local and federal agencies; and the California State University, we address some of the most pressing problems of our day, including

  • researching how to make safe, affordable food available to the world's 7 billion people;

  • protecting scarce natural resources;

  • building healthy, prosperous communities; and

  • educating our future leaders to meet these and tomorrow's challenges.

In many ways ANR functions as UC's 11th campus. We don't grant degrees, but we educate more than 150,000 California young people every year in the California 4-H Youth Development Program. One of the original Cooperative Extension programs, 4-H teaches science, engineering, nutrition, ecology and good citizenship. By participating in 4-H, young people increase their likelihood of graduating from college fivefold.

ANR doesn't operate medical centers, but we work every day to fight childhood obesity and poor nutrition. Our Extension nutrition programs reach more than 222,000 adults and children in 33 counties.

Through UC Cooperative Extension's efforts, over the past three decades California's milk production has increased 44%; its processing tomato yields have increased 69% and almond yields have risen by 122%.

Using ANR-developed technology, California growers save 100,000 acre feet of water a year.

When invasive pests like the Asian citrus psyllid attack crops, ANR fights back with scientific advances in pest management and ongoing research to eradicate the threat.

Even in times of severe budget cutbacks, ANR consistently fulfills its public service responsibilities. The university and ANR have suffered through chronic funding declines that have threatened the quality of our programs and ability to serve the state. Now that California's finances are improving, we must focus on renewal.

Among my highest priorities as vice president is to rebuild the academic footprint of UC Cooperative Extension. To sustain UC's credibility with the people it was created to serve, we must continue to replenish our ranks and revitalize programs trimmed during lean budget years.

We also must forge new public-private partnerships and strengthen the ones we have to attract diversified funding sources to our programs.

And we must build collaborations within the UC campuses to take advantage of the multidisciplinary nature of transformative research.

These are some of the challenges that keep me awake at night. We must accomplish these goals and more if UC Cooperative Extension and all of ANR are to contribute another 100 years to the health and vibrancy of the California we all treasure.

Replenishing ANR's Cooperative Extension academic ranks

The following academic personnel have joined UC ANR since July 2012.

Oli Bachie
Advisor; Imperial, Riverside and San Diego counties

Rob Bennaton
Advisor; Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties
Director; Alameda and Contra Costa counties

Dustin Blakey
Advisor and Director; Inyo and Mono counties

Virginia Bolshakova
Advisor and Director; San Francisco and San Mateo counties
Director; Elkus Ranch

Gurreet Brar
Advisor; Fresno and Madera counties

Lyn (Rebecca) Brock
Academic Coordinator; UC Nutrition Education Professional Development Program

Sandra Derby
Academic Coordinator; California Project Learning Tree Program

Ryan DeSantis
Advisor; Shasta, Siskiyou and Trinity counties

Dorina M. Espinoza
Advisor; Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake and Mendocino counties

Jim Farrar
Director; Western IPM Center

Julie Finzel
Advisor; Kern, Kings and Tulare counties

Lisa Fischer
Associate Director; Research and Extension Center System

Missy Gable
Director; Statewide Master Gardener Program

Latonya Harris
Academic Coordinator; Youth, Families and Communities Statewide Program

Russell Hill
Advisor; Madera, Mariposa, Merced and Stanislaus counties

Anne Iaccopucci
Academic Coordinator; 4-H Healthy Living Initiative

Jeremy James
Specialist and Director; Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center

Shimat V. Joseph
Advisor; Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz counties

Susie Kocher
Advisor; Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado and Tuolumne counties

Igor Lacan
Advisor; Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties

Michelle Leinfelder-Miles
Advisor; Contra Costa, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Solano and Yolo counties

Dani Lightle
Advisor; Glenn County

Bruce Linquist
Specialist; Department of Plant Sciences, UC Davis

Mark Lundy
Advisor; Colusa, Sutter and Yuba Counties

Fadzayi Mashiri
Advisor; Madera, Mariposa and Merced counties
Director; Mariposa County

JoLynn Miller
Advisor; Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado and Tuolumne counties

Maurice Pitesky
Specialist; Department of Population Health and Reproduction, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Lorrene Ritchie
Specialist and Director; Nutrition Policy Institute

Drusilla Rosales
Advisor; Los Angeles and Orange counties

Samuel Sandoval Solis
Specialist and Assistant Professor; Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis

Noelia Silva-del-Rio
Specialist; Department of Population Health and Reproduction, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Christopher Smith
Director; Ventura County
Director; Hansen Research and Extension Center

Martin Smith
Specialist; Department of Human Ecology and UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Katherine Soule
Advisor; San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties

Alex Souza
Advisor; Kern and Tulare counties

Jeffery Stackhouse
Advisor; Del Norte and Humboldt counties

Kristen Stenger
Advisor; Fresno and Madera counties

Andrew Sutherland
Advisor; Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties

Kris Tollerup
Advisor; Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Julia Van Soelen Kim
Advisor; Marin, Mendocino, Napa and Sonoma counties

Guangyao “Sam” Wang
Specialist and Director; Desert Research and Extension Center

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Rebuilding for the next 100 years

Barbara H. Allen-Diaz
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Rebuilding for the next 100 years

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Barbara H. Allen-Diaz , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 68(1):6-7. DOI: 10.3733/ca.v068n01p6.

Published online January 01, 2014

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

NALT Keywords

Author Affiliations show

Full text

In 2014 our nation commemorates the 100th anniversary of the founding of Cooperative Extension. For the University of California's Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR), this is both a year for celebration and for renewal.

As California's land-grant research university, UC, in 1914, was given the task of building the Extension system that the Smith-Lever Act envisioned would propel U.S. agriculture into the modern era. UC ANR embraced that vision with a prophetic belief that scientific knowledge could, indeed, transform California into the world's most successful agricultural producer.

For 100 years, UC Cooperative Extension has served as ANR's “community ambassador,” delivering research and education programs in every California county. During this centennial year, we have much to celebrate, thanks to our storied history and the 1,350 dedicated individuals who make UC Cooperative Extension and all of ANR thrive.

UC ANR researcher checking codling moth trap in a walnut tree at sunrise

UC ANR researcher checking codling moth trap in a walnut tree at sunrise

Today, we operate nine Research and Extension Centers, 60 county offices and three administrative centers, with more than 11,000 acres, 320 Extension researchers and 650 campus-based academics devoted to sustaining and improving California's agricultural and natural resources.

Through this vast statewide network, ANR delivers practical, science-based information to California growers, ranchers, decision makers and, perhaps most importantly, the people of California.

Through our partnerships with the agricultural community; state, local and federal agencies; and the California State University, we address some of the most pressing problems of our day, including

  • researching how to make safe, affordable food available to the world's 7 billion people;

  • protecting scarce natural resources;

  • building healthy, prosperous communities; and

  • educating our future leaders to meet these and tomorrow's challenges.

In many ways ANR functions as UC's 11th campus. We don't grant degrees, but we educate more than 150,000 California young people every year in the California 4-H Youth Development Program. One of the original Cooperative Extension programs, 4-H teaches science, engineering, nutrition, ecology and good citizenship. By participating in 4-H, young people increase their likelihood of graduating from college fivefold.

ANR doesn't operate medical centers, but we work every day to fight childhood obesity and poor nutrition. Our Extension nutrition programs reach more than 222,000 adults and children in 33 counties.

Through UC Cooperative Extension's efforts, over the past three decades California's milk production has increased 44%; its processing tomato yields have increased 69% and almond yields have risen by 122%.

Using ANR-developed technology, California growers save 100,000 acre feet of water a year.

When invasive pests like the Asian citrus psyllid attack crops, ANR fights back with scientific advances in pest management and ongoing research to eradicate the threat.

Even in times of severe budget cutbacks, ANR consistently fulfills its public service responsibilities. The university and ANR have suffered through chronic funding declines that have threatened the quality of our programs and ability to serve the state. Now that California's finances are improving, we must focus on renewal.

Among my highest priorities as vice president is to rebuild the academic footprint of UC Cooperative Extension. To sustain UC's credibility with the people it was created to serve, we must continue to replenish our ranks and revitalize programs trimmed during lean budget years.

We also must forge new public-private partnerships and strengthen the ones we have to attract diversified funding sources to our programs.

And we must build collaborations within the UC campuses to take advantage of the multidisciplinary nature of transformative research.

These are some of the challenges that keep me awake at night. We must accomplish these goals and more if UC Cooperative Extension and all of ANR are to contribute another 100 years to the health and vibrancy of the California we all treasure.

Replenishing ANR's Cooperative Extension academic ranks

The following academic personnel have joined UC ANR since July 2012.

Oli Bachie
Advisor; Imperial, Riverside and San Diego counties

Rob Bennaton
Advisor; Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties
Director; Alameda and Contra Costa counties

Dustin Blakey
Advisor and Director; Inyo and Mono counties

Virginia Bolshakova
Advisor and Director; San Francisco and San Mateo counties
Director; Elkus Ranch

Gurreet Brar
Advisor; Fresno and Madera counties

Lyn (Rebecca) Brock
Academic Coordinator; UC Nutrition Education Professional Development Program

Sandra Derby
Academic Coordinator; California Project Learning Tree Program

Ryan DeSantis
Advisor; Shasta, Siskiyou and Trinity counties

Dorina M. Espinoza
Advisor; Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake and Mendocino counties

Jim Farrar
Director; Western IPM Center

Julie Finzel
Advisor; Kern, Kings and Tulare counties

Lisa Fischer
Associate Director; Research and Extension Center System

Missy Gable
Director; Statewide Master Gardener Program

Latonya Harris
Academic Coordinator; Youth, Families and Communities Statewide Program

Russell Hill
Advisor; Madera, Mariposa, Merced and Stanislaus counties

Anne Iaccopucci
Academic Coordinator; 4-H Healthy Living Initiative

Jeremy James
Specialist and Director; Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center

Shimat V. Joseph
Advisor; Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz counties

Susie Kocher
Advisor; Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado and Tuolumne counties

Igor Lacan
Advisor; Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties

Michelle Leinfelder-Miles
Advisor; Contra Costa, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Solano and Yolo counties

Dani Lightle
Advisor; Glenn County

Bruce Linquist
Specialist; Department of Plant Sciences, UC Davis

Mark Lundy
Advisor; Colusa, Sutter and Yuba Counties

Fadzayi Mashiri
Advisor; Madera, Mariposa and Merced counties
Director; Mariposa County

JoLynn Miller
Advisor; Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado and Tuolumne counties

Maurice Pitesky
Specialist; Department of Population Health and Reproduction, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Lorrene Ritchie
Specialist and Director; Nutrition Policy Institute

Drusilla Rosales
Advisor; Los Angeles and Orange counties

Samuel Sandoval Solis
Specialist and Assistant Professor; Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis

Noelia Silva-del-Rio
Specialist; Department of Population Health and Reproduction, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Christopher Smith
Director; Ventura County
Director; Hansen Research and Extension Center

Martin Smith
Specialist; Department of Human Ecology and UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Katherine Soule
Advisor; San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties

Alex Souza
Advisor; Kern and Tulare counties

Jeffery Stackhouse
Advisor; Del Norte and Humboldt counties

Kristen Stenger
Advisor; Fresno and Madera counties

Andrew Sutherland
Advisor; Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties

Kris Tollerup
Advisor; Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Julia Van Soelen Kim
Advisor; Marin, Mendocino, Napa and Sonoma counties

Guangyao “Sam” Wang
Specialist and Director; Desert Research and Extension Center

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Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu