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Foraging in Central Valley agricultural drainage areas

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Authors

Mark Campbell, University of California
L. Clair Christensen, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 43(3):23-25.

Published May 01, 1989

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Abstract

For as long as there have been humans in the Central Valley grasslands, they have hunted, fished, and gathered plant or animal life for consumption. “Foraging” became a health concern with the evidence of selenium accumulation at Kesterson Reservoir. A survey suggests that a large number and variety of people forage. The amounts and frequency of consumption are probably not great enough to be a health hazard to any one person or group, but there is still some cause for concern.

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Foraging in Central Valley agricultural drainage areas

Mark Campbell, L. Clair Christensen
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Foraging in Central Valley agricultural drainage areas

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Mark Campbell, University of California
L. Clair Christensen, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 43(3):23-25.

Published May 01, 1989

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

For as long as there have been humans in the Central Valley grasslands, they have hunted, fished, and gathered plant or animal life for consumption. “Foraging” became a health concern with the evidence of selenium accumulation at Kesterson Reservoir. A survey suggests that a large number and variety of people forage. The amounts and frequency of consumption are probably not great enough to be a health hazard to any one person or group, but there is still some cause for concern.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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