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Desert alfalfa grazing–it's the leaf that counts

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Authors

Juan N. Guerrero , University of California
Vern L. Marble
Carlos Hernandez, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 43(2):31-32.

Published March 01, 1989

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Abstract

Lambs turned into desert valley alfalfa fields during winter will make profitable gains if they are moved to another pasture after 10 days of grazing, when the alfalfa is nearly devoid of leaves.

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Author notes

Appreciation is expressed to Broadbent Livestock Co., El Centro, California, for the use of lambs and fencing material, and to Pioneer Hybrid California Crop Improvement for financial assistance. Thanks are given to Ms. Carol Adams, UC Cooperative Extension Biometrician, for assistance with data analyses.

Desert alfalfa grazing–it's the leaf that counts

Juan N. Guerrero, Vern L. Marble, Carlos Hernandez
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Desert alfalfa grazing–it's the leaf that counts

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Juan N. Guerrero , University of California
Vern L. Marble
Carlos Hernandez, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 43(2):31-32.

Published March 01, 1989

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Lambs turned into desert valley alfalfa fields during winter will make profitable gains if they are moved to another pasture after 10 days of grazing, when the alfalfa is nearly devoid of leaves.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Appreciation is expressed to Broadbent Livestock Co., El Centro, California, for the use of lambs and fencing material, and to Pioneer Hybrid California Crop Improvement for financial assistance. Thanks are given to Ms. Carol Adams, UC Cooperative Extension Biometrician, for assistance with data analyses.


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