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The Africanized honey bee: Ahead of schedule

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Authors

Norman E. Gary , Department of Entomology, University of California
Howell V. Daly, Department of Entomological Sciences
Sarah Locke, Department of Entomology
Margaret Race, Agricultural Experiment Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 39(11):4-7.

Published November 01, 1985

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Abstract

Arrival of the often irascible Africanized honey bee in California has been anticipated, but not until the 1990s. The bee and its probable impact on the state are the subject of this article by bee researcher Norman Gary and co-authors.In the cover photo, taken by Gary through the glass wall of an observation hive in Brazil, an Africanized queen bee awaits feeding and grooming by worker bees stimulated by a special pheromone she has given off.

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The Africanized honey bee: Ahead of schedule

Norman E. Gary, Howell V. Daly, Sarah Locke, Margaret Race
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

The Africanized honey bee: Ahead of schedule

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Norman E. Gary , Department of Entomology, University of California
Howell V. Daly, Department of Entomological Sciences
Sarah Locke, Department of Entomology
Margaret Race, Agricultural Experiment Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 39(11):4-7.

Published November 01, 1985

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Arrival of the often irascible Africanized honey bee in California has been anticipated, but not until the 1990s. The bee and its probable impact on the state are the subject of this article by bee researcher Norman Gary and co-authors.In the cover photo, taken by Gary through the glass wall of an observation hive in Brazil, an Africanized queen bee awaits feeding and grooming by worker bees stimulated by a special pheromone she has given off.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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