California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1985
Volume 39, Number 11

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

The Africanized honey bee: Ahead of schedule
by Norman E. Gary, Howell V. Daly, Sarah Locke, Margaret Race
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Arrival of the often irascible Africanized honey bee in California has been anticipated, but not until the 1990s. The bee and its probable impact on the state are the subject of this article by bee researcher Norman Gary and co-authors.In the cover photo, taken by Gary through the glass wall of an observation hive in Brazil, an Africanized queen bee awaits feeding and grooming by worker bees stimulated by a special pheromone she has given off.
Cotton and California temperatures
by Robert W. Pease
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A new method of calculating optimum temperatures for growth suggests some northern Central Valley areas might suitable for cotton.
Yellow starthistle infestations are on the increase
by Donald M. Maddox, Aubrey Mayfield
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This thorny pest has spread from an estimated 1.2 million acres in 1958 to 7.9 million in 1985, much of it in northern California.
Rhizoctonia stem canker on beans
by Albert O. Paulus, Robert A. Brendler, Jerry Nelson, Harold W. Otto
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A new fungicide against Rhizoctonia combined with an anti-Pythium compound performed better than the standard bean seed treatment.
The fragmented California farm labor market
by Philip L. Martin, Suzanne Vaupel, William Amaya, Cheryl Fish, Ricardo Amon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Immigration reform or changes in farm labor laws would affect different crops differently.
Weed management on specialty farms
by Cart E. Bell, Alfonso Durazo, Clyde L. Elmore
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A weed management system tested for small farms combines plastic mulch, drip irrigation, and in some cases, a preplant broad-spectrum weed killer.
Improving honey bee pollination efficiency in almonds
by Gerald M. Loper, Robbin W. Thorp, Richard Berdel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Experiments with colony distribution and forager efficiency turned up some potential improvements.
Biological control of two avocado pests
by Earl R. Oatman, Gary R. Platner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When Amorbia cuneana and omnivorous looper show signs of building up, releases of an egg parasite can effectively augment natural control.
Weed control under drip and low-volume sprinkler irrigation
by Bill B. Fischer, David A. Goldhamer, Thomas Babb, Roger Kjelgren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Preemergence herbicides give longer lasting control under low-volume sprinklers than drip, but the frequent wetting still causes weed problems.
Yellow and green foxtail control in alfalfa
by Jack P. Orr, W. Michael Canevari, Donald R. Colbert, Ronald N. Vargas, Russell W. Wallace, Raymond C. Henning
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
It may be practical to use herbicides to reduce foxtail seed heads, the main contaminant.
Feeding affects post-milking cow activities
by Thomas A. Shultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When feed was abundant after milking, cows tended to eat rather than lie down, desirable behavior for feed intake and possibly mastitis reduction.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

The natural reserve system: The university's uncut diamond
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

1985 annual index
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1985
Volume 39, Number 11

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

The Africanized honey bee: Ahead of schedule
by Norman E. Gary, Howell V. Daly, Sarah Locke, Margaret Race
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Arrival of the often irascible Africanized honey bee in California has been anticipated, but not until the 1990s. The bee and its probable impact on the state are the subject of this article by bee researcher Norman Gary and co-authors.In the cover photo, taken by Gary through the glass wall of an observation hive in Brazil, an Africanized queen bee awaits feeding and grooming by worker bees stimulated by a special pheromone she has given off.
Cotton and California temperatures
by Robert W. Pease
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A new method of calculating optimum temperatures for growth suggests some northern Central Valley areas might suitable for cotton.
Yellow starthistle infestations are on the increase
by Donald M. Maddox, Aubrey Mayfield
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This thorny pest has spread from an estimated 1.2 million acres in 1958 to 7.9 million in 1985, much of it in northern California.
Rhizoctonia stem canker on beans
by Albert O. Paulus, Robert A. Brendler, Jerry Nelson, Harold W. Otto
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A new fungicide against Rhizoctonia combined with an anti-Pythium compound performed better than the standard bean seed treatment.
The fragmented California farm labor market
by Philip L. Martin, Suzanne Vaupel, William Amaya, Cheryl Fish, Ricardo Amon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Immigration reform or changes in farm labor laws would affect different crops differently.
Weed management on specialty farms
by Cart E. Bell, Alfonso Durazo, Clyde L. Elmore
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A weed management system tested for small farms combines plastic mulch, drip irrigation, and in some cases, a preplant broad-spectrum weed killer.
Improving honey bee pollination efficiency in almonds
by Gerald M. Loper, Robbin W. Thorp, Richard Berdel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Experiments with colony distribution and forager efficiency turned up some potential improvements.
Biological control of two avocado pests
by Earl R. Oatman, Gary R. Platner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When Amorbia cuneana and omnivorous looper show signs of building up, releases of an egg parasite can effectively augment natural control.
Weed control under drip and low-volume sprinkler irrigation
by Bill B. Fischer, David A. Goldhamer, Thomas Babb, Roger Kjelgren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Preemergence herbicides give longer lasting control under low-volume sprinklers than drip, but the frequent wetting still causes weed problems.
Yellow and green foxtail control in alfalfa
by Jack P. Orr, W. Michael Canevari, Donald R. Colbert, Ronald N. Vargas, Russell W. Wallace, Raymond C. Henning
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
It may be practical to use herbicides to reduce foxtail seed heads, the main contaminant.
Feeding affects post-milking cow activities
by Thomas A. Shultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When feed was abundant after milking, cows tended to eat rather than lie down, desirable behavior for feed intake and possibly mastitis reduction.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

The natural reserve system: The university's uncut diamond
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

1985 annual index
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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