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Scarring of Thompson Seedless table grapes

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Authors

Donald A. Luvisi , Kern County
A. N. Kasimatis, University of California, Davis, Calif.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 26(8):3-5.

Published August 01, 1972

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Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The studies reported here show that some table Thompson Seedless grapes grown in the southern San Joaquin Valley are subject to a scarring problem and this scarring may occur to some degree even when no sprays are applied to the berries. When sprays are applied during bloom and after, the degree and severity of scarring tends to increase. That scarring could be found on berries when the calyptras persisted after bloom, suggests that they play some role in the scarring injury. While the scarring is similar in its superficial nature to that caused by thrips, the pattern is different. Since thrips were not eliminated from the tests, studies during 1972 will attempt to evaluate the relationship between adhering calyptras, spray timing and thrips feeding.

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Scarring of Thompson Seedless table grapes

Donald A. Luvisi, A. N. Kasimatis
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Scarring of Thompson Seedless table grapes

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Donald A. Luvisi , Kern County
A. N. Kasimatis, University of California, Davis, Calif.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 26(8):3-5.

Published August 01, 1972

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The studies reported here show that some table Thompson Seedless grapes grown in the southern San Joaquin Valley are subject to a scarring problem and this scarring may occur to some degree even when no sprays are applied to the berries. When sprays are applied during bloom and after, the degree and severity of scarring tends to increase. That scarring could be found on berries when the calyptras persisted after bloom, suggests that they play some role in the scarring injury. While the scarring is similar in its superficial nature to that caused by thrips, the pattern is different. Since thrips were not eliminated from the tests, studies during 1972 will attempt to evaluate the relationship between adhering calyptras, spray timing and thrips feeding.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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