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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 26, No.8

Cover:  Thompson Seedless berry heavily scarred at the stylar end where the calyptra is persistent after bloom, suggests this plays some role in the scarring injury - even when no spray has been applied.
August 1972
Volume 26, Number 8

Research articles

Scarring of Thompson Seedless table grapes
by Donald A. Luvisi, A. N. Kasimatis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The studies reported here show that some table Thompson Seedless grapes grown in the southern San Joaquin Valley are subject to a scarring problem and this scarring may occur to some degree even when no sprays are applied to the berries. When sprays are applied during bloom and after, the degree and severity of scarring tends to increase. That scarring could be found on berries when the calyptras persisted after bloom, suggests that they play some role in the scarring injury. While the scarring is similar in its superficial nature to that caused by thrips, the pattern is different. Since thrips were not eliminated from the tests, studies during 1972 will attempt to evaluate the relationship between adhering calyptras, spray timing and thrips feeding.
The studies reported here show that some table Thompson Seedless grapes grown in the southern San Joaquin Valley are subject to a scarring problem and this scarring may occur to some degree even when no sprays are applied to the berries. When sprays are applied during bloom and after, the degree and severity of scarring tends to increase. That scarring could be found on berries when the calyptras persisted after bloom, suggests that they play some role in the scarring injury. While the scarring is similar in its superficial nature to that caused by thrips, the pattern is different. Since thrips were not eliminated from the tests, studies during 1972 will attempt to evaluate the relationship between adhering calyptras, spray timing and thrips feeding.
The influence of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, on parsley yields under controlled greenhouse conditions
by J. D. Radewald, F. Shibuya, J. Nelson, R. A. Brendler, M. Vilchez
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Parsley growing in the coarse-textured soils of the coastal areas of southern California is sometimes severely infected with the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. Affected plants at first appear slightly stunted and the older leaves chlorotic. With each cutting of the parsley greenery, the lower leaves die at a higher level on the plant and the yields lessen because the dead foliage cannot be used by parsley processors. Since yellow and/or dead leaves are harvested along with green foliage, they must be sorted out manually, thereby increasing grower and processor costs. Following the second cutting, many plants fail to produce harvestable foliage and frequently die. This article establishes the effects of root-knot upon yields of a highly susceptible parsely variety under controlled conditions of the greenhouse.
Parsley growing in the coarse-textured soils of the coastal areas of southern California is sometimes severely infected with the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. Affected plants at first appear slightly stunted and the older leaves chlorotic. With each cutting of the parsley greenery, the lower leaves die at a higher level on the plant and the yields lessen because the dead foliage cannot be used by parsley processors. Since yellow and/or dead leaves are harvested along with green foliage, they must be sorted out manually, thereby increasing grower and processor costs. Following the second cutting, many plants fail to produce harvestable foliage and frequently die. This article establishes the effects of root-knot upon yields of a highly susceptible parsely variety under controlled conditions of the greenhouse.
Sizing cherry fruit with antitranspirant sprays
by D. C. Davenport, K. Uriu, R. M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A film-forming antitranspirant sprayed on Bing cherry trees 10 days before harvest improved the water status resulting in fruit size increases of 15%, without affecting dry weight. Application too early (3 weeks before harvest) reduced dry weight, however.
A film-forming antitranspirant sprayed on Bing cherry trees 10 days before harvest improved the water status resulting in fruit size increases of 15%, without affecting dry weight. Application too early (3 weeks before harvest) reduced dry weight, however.
Ornamental seedling treatment …influences on subsequent plant growth
by Tok Furuta, Tom Mock, W. Clay Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seedlings and small plants are often maintained in small pots under reduced or low nutritional levels to prevent rapid growth. The rationale for this practice is to prolong marketability of the small plants. The argument goes that too rapid growth results in the plants becoming excessively pot bound or “overgrown” quickly, thus reducing the market life of the plants. It is further argued that reduced nutrition does not influence subsequent growth rate.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seedlings and small plants are often maintained in small pots under reduced or low nutritional levels to prevent rapid growth. The rationale for this practice is to prolong marketability of the small plants. The argument goes that too rapid growth results in the plants becoming excessively pot bound or “overgrown” quickly, thus reducing the market life of the plants. It is further argued that reduced nutrition does not influence subsequent growth rate.
Growing bougainvillea as a flowering pot plant
by W. P. Hackett, R. M. Sachs, J. Debie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: This article discusses the production of small floriferous bougainvillea plants, including methods and techniques for propagation, promotion of flowering, and delay of flower drop.
This article discusses the production of small floriferous bougainvillea plants, including methods and techniques for propagation, promotion of flowering, and delay of flower drop.
Chemical weed control in carnation transplants
by Jack L. Bivins, Clyde Elmore, Art Lange
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Weeds are a problem in transplanted carnations during early stages of development when there can be no soil fumigation or steam sterilization. Early mechanical control of weeds is made impossible by the wire, plastic or bamboo netting that is placed on beds at planting for plant support. The only alternative is expensive hand weeding. The study reported here evaluates herbicides for control of weeds in transplanted carnations in ground beds.
Weeds are a problem in transplanted carnations during early stages of development when there can be no soil fumigation or steam sterilization. Early mechanical control of weeds is made impossible by the wire, plastic or bamboo netting that is placed on beds at planting for plant support. The only alternative is expensive hand weeding. The study reported here evaluates herbicides for control of weeds in transplanted carnations in ground beds.

News and Opinion

Research… for whom?
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 26, No.8

Cover:  Thompson Seedless berry heavily scarred at the stylar end where the calyptra is persistent after bloom, suggests this plays some role in the scarring injury - even when no spray has been applied.
August 1972
Volume 26, Number 8

Research articles

Scarring of Thompson Seedless table grapes
by Donald A. Luvisi, A. N. Kasimatis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The studies reported here show that some table Thompson Seedless grapes grown in the southern San Joaquin Valley are subject to a scarring problem and this scarring may occur to some degree even when no sprays are applied to the berries. When sprays are applied during bloom and after, the degree and severity of scarring tends to increase. That scarring could be found on berries when the calyptras persisted after bloom, suggests that they play some role in the scarring injury. While the scarring is similar in its superficial nature to that caused by thrips, the pattern is different. Since thrips were not eliminated from the tests, studies during 1972 will attempt to evaluate the relationship between adhering calyptras, spray timing and thrips feeding.
The studies reported here show that some table Thompson Seedless grapes grown in the southern San Joaquin Valley are subject to a scarring problem and this scarring may occur to some degree even when no sprays are applied to the berries. When sprays are applied during bloom and after, the degree and severity of scarring tends to increase. That scarring could be found on berries when the calyptras persisted after bloom, suggests that they play some role in the scarring injury. While the scarring is similar in its superficial nature to that caused by thrips, the pattern is different. Since thrips were not eliminated from the tests, studies during 1972 will attempt to evaluate the relationship between adhering calyptras, spray timing and thrips feeding.
The influence of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, on parsley yields under controlled greenhouse conditions
by J. D. Radewald, F. Shibuya, J. Nelson, R. A. Brendler, M. Vilchez
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Parsley growing in the coarse-textured soils of the coastal areas of southern California is sometimes severely infected with the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. Affected plants at first appear slightly stunted and the older leaves chlorotic. With each cutting of the parsley greenery, the lower leaves die at a higher level on the plant and the yields lessen because the dead foliage cannot be used by parsley processors. Since yellow and/or dead leaves are harvested along with green foliage, they must be sorted out manually, thereby increasing grower and processor costs. Following the second cutting, many plants fail to produce harvestable foliage and frequently die. This article establishes the effects of root-knot upon yields of a highly susceptible parsely variety under controlled conditions of the greenhouse.
Parsley growing in the coarse-textured soils of the coastal areas of southern California is sometimes severely infected with the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. Affected plants at first appear slightly stunted and the older leaves chlorotic. With each cutting of the parsley greenery, the lower leaves die at a higher level on the plant and the yields lessen because the dead foliage cannot be used by parsley processors. Since yellow and/or dead leaves are harvested along with green foliage, they must be sorted out manually, thereby increasing grower and processor costs. Following the second cutting, many plants fail to produce harvestable foliage and frequently die. This article establishes the effects of root-knot upon yields of a highly susceptible parsely variety under controlled conditions of the greenhouse.
Sizing cherry fruit with antitranspirant sprays
by D. C. Davenport, K. Uriu, R. M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A film-forming antitranspirant sprayed on Bing cherry trees 10 days before harvest improved the water status resulting in fruit size increases of 15%, without affecting dry weight. Application too early (3 weeks before harvest) reduced dry weight, however.
A film-forming antitranspirant sprayed on Bing cherry trees 10 days before harvest improved the water status resulting in fruit size increases of 15%, without affecting dry weight. Application too early (3 weeks before harvest) reduced dry weight, however.
Ornamental seedling treatment …influences on subsequent plant growth
by Tok Furuta, Tom Mock, W. Clay Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seedlings and small plants are often maintained in small pots under reduced or low nutritional levels to prevent rapid growth. The rationale for this practice is to prolong marketability of the small plants. The argument goes that too rapid growth results in the plants becoming excessively pot bound or “overgrown” quickly, thus reducing the market life of the plants. It is further argued that reduced nutrition does not influence subsequent growth rate.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seedlings and small plants are often maintained in small pots under reduced or low nutritional levels to prevent rapid growth. The rationale for this practice is to prolong marketability of the small plants. The argument goes that too rapid growth results in the plants becoming excessively pot bound or “overgrown” quickly, thus reducing the market life of the plants. It is further argued that reduced nutrition does not influence subsequent growth rate.
Growing bougainvillea as a flowering pot plant
by W. P. Hackett, R. M. Sachs, J. Debie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: This article discusses the production of small floriferous bougainvillea plants, including methods and techniques for propagation, promotion of flowering, and delay of flower drop.
This article discusses the production of small floriferous bougainvillea plants, including methods and techniques for propagation, promotion of flowering, and delay of flower drop.
Chemical weed control in carnation transplants
by Jack L. Bivins, Clyde Elmore, Art Lange
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Weeds are a problem in transplanted carnations during early stages of development when there can be no soil fumigation or steam sterilization. Early mechanical control of weeds is made impossible by the wire, plastic or bamboo netting that is placed on beds at planting for plant support. The only alternative is expensive hand weeding. The study reported here evaluates herbicides for control of weeds in transplanted carnations in ground beds.
Weeds are a problem in transplanted carnations during early stages of development when there can be no soil fumigation or steam sterilization. Early mechanical control of weeds is made impossible by the wire, plastic or bamboo netting that is placed on beds at planting for plant support. The only alternative is expensive hand weeding. The study reported here evaluates herbicides for control of weeds in transplanted carnations in ground beds.

News and Opinion

Research… for whom?
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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