California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Effects of irrigation management on chemical composition of soybeans in the San Joaquin Valley

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

R. J. Miller, Department of Water Science and Engineering, University of California
B. H. Beard, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Southwestern lrrigation Field Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(9):8-10.

Published September 01, 1967

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The recent cutbacks in acreage allotments in the San Joaquin Valley have caused cotton ranchers with interests in oil-processing facilities to recognize the need for a supplemental oil crop, such as soybeans, to allow continued use of the facilities at or near capacity. Projected population increases in many parts of the world also indicate that a protein crop such as soybean could have increasing importance in meeting future food needs.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Ranchers Cotton Oil Co., Fresno, arranged for chemical analyses of the seed during the study.

Annual reports on irrigation studies with soybeans—submitted over the past 10 to 12 years by R. T. Edwards, O. P. Gautam, and P. F. Knowles, U. C., Davis—were utilized in the preparation and conduct of these investigations.

Effects of irrigation management on chemical composition of soybeans in the San Joaquin Valley

R. J. Miller, B. H. Beard
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Effects of irrigation management on chemical composition of soybeans in the San Joaquin Valley

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

R. J. Miller, Department of Water Science and Engineering, University of California
B. H. Beard, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Southwestern lrrigation Field Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(9):8-10.

Published September 01, 1967

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The recent cutbacks in acreage allotments in the San Joaquin Valley have caused cotton ranchers with interests in oil-processing facilities to recognize the need for a supplemental oil crop, such as soybeans, to allow continued use of the facilities at or near capacity. Projected population increases in many parts of the world also indicate that a protein crop such as soybean could have increasing importance in meeting future food needs.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Ranchers Cotton Oil Co., Fresno, arranged for chemical analyses of the seed during the study.

Annual reports on irrigation studies with soybeans—submitted over the past 10 to 12 years by R. T. Edwards, O. P. Gautam, and P. F. Knowles, U. C., Davis—were utilized in the preparation and conduct of these investigations.


University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: https://calag.ucanr.edu