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Integrating Management of Ground and Imported Water in Los Angeles County

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Authors

Robert L. Leonard, University of Connecticut

Publication Information

California Agriculture 19(9):11-13.

Published September 01, 1965

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Abstract

As the demand for water grows in southern California, more distant sources of surface water must be utilized (at increasing costs per unit), and it becomes increasingly essential that the management of imported supplies and local groundwater basins be closely integrated. The recent Supreme Court decision on the Colorado River jeopardizes the area's future supply of water from the river and intensifies the importance of making full use of southern California's quota while it is still available. For at least a few years following completion of the proposed aqueduct from northern California, import capacity will likely exceed that needed for current use. Construction of facilities for importing surface water is only one step toward stopping the overdraft of groundwater basins in Los Angeles County. An opportunity exists for building up groundwater levels while excess import capacity is available. Major institutional changes are necessary, however, for efficient joint utilization of local groundwater and imported supplies of surface water needed to accomplish this objective.

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Author notes

This condensation is based on a more detailed report by the author, “Integrated Management of Ground- and Surface Water in Relation to Water Importation: The Experience of Los Angeles County,” Giannini Foundation Research Report No. 279, October, 1964. Both reports are from research performed while the author was a Junior Specialist in the Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of California, Berkeley.

Integrating Management of Ground and Imported Water in Los Angeles County

Robert L. Leonard
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Integrating Management of Ground and Imported Water in Los Angeles County

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Robert L. Leonard, University of Connecticut

Publication Information

California Agriculture 19(9):11-13.

Published September 01, 1965

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

As the demand for water grows in southern California, more distant sources of surface water must be utilized (at increasing costs per unit), and it becomes increasingly essential that the management of imported supplies and local groundwater basins be closely integrated. The recent Supreme Court decision on the Colorado River jeopardizes the area's future supply of water from the river and intensifies the importance of making full use of southern California's quota while it is still available. For at least a few years following completion of the proposed aqueduct from northern California, import capacity will likely exceed that needed for current use. Construction of facilities for importing surface water is only one step toward stopping the overdraft of groundwater basins in Los Angeles County. An opportunity exists for building up groundwater levels while excess import capacity is available. Major institutional changes are necessary, however, for efficient joint utilization of local groundwater and imported supplies of surface water needed to accomplish this objective.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This condensation is based on a more detailed report by the author, “Integrated Management of Ground- and Surface Water in Relation to Water Importation: The Experience of Los Angeles County,” Giannini Foundation Research Report No. 279, October, 1964. Both reports are from research performed while the author was a Junior Specialist in the Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of California, Berkeley.


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