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Chaparral to grass conversion: Doubles watershed runoff

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Authors

A. F. Pillsbury, University of California
R. E. Pelishek, University of California
J. F. Osborn, University of California
T. E. Szuszkiewicz, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(11):12-13.

Published November 01, 1961

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Abstract

Conversion of chaparral-covered watersheds to native grasses and forbs resulted in production of significantly more surface water runoff—without appreciable erosion after conversion—in southern California test areas. Grazing potential of the watersheds was also greatly increased and wildfire hazards reduced.

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Author notes

The plots discussed were on the Santa Rosa Ranch of the Vail Co. Mr. Louis L. Roripaugh, Manager for that organization, was particularly helpful. The work was supported by Hatch Act funds and by Western Regional Research Project W-32.

Chaparral to grass conversion: Doubles watershed runoff

A. F. Pillsbury, R. E. Pelishek, J. F. Osborn, T. E. Szuszkiewicz
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Chaparral to grass conversion: Doubles watershed runoff

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

A. F. Pillsbury, University of California
R. E. Pelishek, University of California
J. F. Osborn, University of California
T. E. Szuszkiewicz, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(11):12-13.

Published November 01, 1961

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Conversion of chaparral-covered watersheds to native grasses and forbs resulted in production of significantly more surface water runoff—without appreciable erosion after conversion—in southern California test areas. Grazing potential of the watersheds was also greatly increased and wildfire hazards reduced.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The plots discussed were on the Santa Rosa Ranch of the Vail Co. Mr. Louis L. Roripaugh, Manager for that organization, was particularly helpful. The work was supported by Hatch Act funds and by Western Regional Research Project W-32.


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