California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Water penetration of soils: Soil and water management practices important in coping with widespread problem of soil penetration by irrigation water

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

D. W. Henderson, University of California
J. A. Vomocil, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 11(4):23-37.

Published April 01, 1957

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The slow rate of water penetration into soils during irrigation is a serious problem, affecting—to some degree—a large portion of the major irrigated areas of California. In extreme cases there is a marked loss of production because it is difficult to supply crops with sufficient water even with frequent irrigation.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Water penetration of soils: Soil and water management practices important in coping with widespread problem of soil penetration by irrigation water

D. W. Henderson, J. A. Vomocil
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Water penetration of soils: Soil and water management practices important in coping with widespread problem of soil penetration by irrigation water

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

D. W. Henderson, University of California
J. A. Vomocil, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 11(4):23-37.

Published April 01, 1957

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The slow rate of water penetration into soils during irrigation is a serious problem, affecting—to some degree—a large portion of the major irrigated areas of California. In extreme cases there is a marked loss of production because it is difficult to supply crops with sufficient water even with frequent irrigation.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: https://calag.ucanr.edu