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California Agriculture
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Enemies of spotted alfalfa aphid: Lady beetles, hover flies, lacewings are there important native predators of aphids and other economic pests of alfalfa

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Authors

Ray F. Smith, University of California
Kenneth S. Hagen, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 10(4):8-10.

Published April 01, 1956

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Abstract

Natural enemies—native insect predators and fungus diseases—helped to hold the spotted alfalfa aphid in check during the 1955 season. In some fields an epizootic—corresponding to an epidemic among humans—of a fungus disease prevented damage by the aphid.

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Author notes

Drawings by Celeste Green, Illustrator, Entomology and Parasitology, University of California.

Photograph by Frank Skinner, Senior Laboratory Technician, Biological Control, University of California, Berkeley.

The above progress report is based on Research Projects No. 1330 and No. 1650.

Enemies of spotted alfalfa aphid: Lady beetles, hover flies, lacewings are there important native predators of aphids and other economic pests of alfalfa

Ray F. Smith, Kenneth S. Hagen
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Enemies of spotted alfalfa aphid: Lady beetles, hover flies, lacewings are there important native predators of aphids and other economic pests of alfalfa

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Ray F. Smith, University of California
Kenneth S. Hagen, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 10(4):8-10.

Published April 01, 1956

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Natural enemies—native insect predators and fungus diseases—helped to hold the spotted alfalfa aphid in check during the 1955 season. In some fields an epizootic—corresponding to an epidemic among humans—of a fungus disease prevented damage by the aphid.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Drawings by Celeste Green, Illustrator, Entomology and Parasitology, University of California.

Photograph by Frank Skinner, Senior Laboratory Technician, Biological Control, University of California, Berkeley.

The above progress report is based on Research Projects No. 1330 and No. 1650.


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