California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Soil temperature and citrus: Low soil temperature contributes to low number of roots under citrus trees in some areas of southern California

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

C. P. North, University of California
A. Wallace, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 9(11):13-13.

Published November 01, 1955

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Low soil temperatures—causing low root temperatures—induced foliage wilt in glasshouse experiments with several citrus species on various rootstocks. At soil temperatures ranging from 48F to 62F and with plenty of moisture available, the foliage—especially succulent new growth—wilted, but plants having heat supplied to the roots did not wilt.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Soil temperature and citrus: Low soil temperature contributes to low number of roots under citrus trees in some areas of southern California

C. P. North, A. Wallace
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Soil temperature and citrus: Low soil temperature contributes to low number of roots under citrus trees in some areas of southern California

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

C. P. North, University of California
A. Wallace, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 9(11):13-13.

Published November 01, 1955

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Low soil temperatures—causing low root temperatures—induced foliage wilt in glasshouse experiments with several citrus species on various rootstocks. At soil temperatures ranging from 48F to 62F and with plenty of moisture available, the foliage—especially succulent new growth—wilted, but plants having heat supplied to the roots did not wilt.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: https://calag.ucanr.edu