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Artificial breeding of turkeys: Artificial insemination of turkeys requires exacting procedures but does offer specific advantages

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Authors

F. W. Lorenz, University of California College of Agriculture
J. D. Carson, United States Department of Agriculture

Publication Information

California Agriculture 5(12):4-11.

Published December 01, 1951

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Abstract

Artificial insemination of breeding turkeys seems to offer three specific advantages over natural mating: 1, elimination of the need for saddles and thus of damage to the hens by the toms, 2, fewer males needed, and 3, increased fertility.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 677H5 Co-operative Regional Project W7.

Artificial breeding of turkeys: Artificial insemination of turkeys requires exacting procedures but does offer specific advantages

F. W. Lorenz, J. D. Carson
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Artificial breeding of turkeys: Artificial insemination of turkeys requires exacting procedures but does offer specific advantages

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

F. W. Lorenz, University of California College of Agriculture
J. D. Carson, United States Department of Agriculture

Publication Information

California Agriculture 5(12):4-11.

Published December 01, 1951

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Artificial insemination of breeding turkeys seems to offer three specific advantages over natural mating: 1, elimination of the need for saddles and thus of damage to the hens by the toms, 2, fewer males needed, and 3, increased fertility.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 677H5 Co-operative Regional Project W7.


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