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California Agriculture, Vol. 8, No.7

Mutual parasites of sheep and deer
July 1954
Volume 8, Number 7

Research articles

Fruit set in melon breeding: Hand pollination found to be less effective than pollination by honeybees in experiments at Davis
by Louis K. Mann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: That field-grown Powdery Mildew Resistant Cantaloupe No. 45 drops fewer pollinated flowers when insect-pollinated than when hand-pollinated was confirmed in a recent comparative study of fruit set on thinned vines.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: That field-grown Powdery Mildew Resistant Cantaloupe No. 45 drops fewer pollinated flowers when insect-pollinated than when hand-pollinated was confirmed in a recent comparative study of fruit set on thinned vines.
Walnut aphid investigations: Tests in northern California during the 1953 season stressed need for thorough treatment for control
by A. E. Michelbacher, Clarence Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Systemic insecticides have been extensively investigated for control of the walnut aphid at Linden for the past two years and in the Walnut Creek, Yuba City, and San Jose areas during 1953.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Systemic insecticides have been extensively investigated for control of the walnut aphid at Linden for the past two years and in the Walnut Creek, Yuba City, and San Jose areas during 1953.
Parasites of sheep and deer: Mutual parasites of domestic sheep and Columbian black-tailed deer studied for transference factors
by Norman F. Baker, James R. Douglas, William M. Longhurst
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Similar foraging habits of sheep and deer provide ample opportunity for transference of mutual parasites.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Similar foraging habits of sheep and deer provide ample opportunity for transference of mutual parasites.
Root fumigation: Carrot and beet roots used in tests for nematode control
by J. F. Harrington, H. K. Pratt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Seedsmen should never use carrot and beet roots infested with root knot nematode for transplanting into uninfested soil.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Seedsmen should never use carrot and beet roots infested with root knot nematode for transplanting into uninfested soil.
Artichoke plume moth damage: Large part of 1953–54 losses believed to be result of inadequate sanitation and cultural practices
by W. Harry Lange, R. H. Sciaroni, A. S. Greathead
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Successful control of the artichoke plume moth in the Half Moon Bay area during experiments in 1949 and 1950 was reported in Californla Agriculture for September, 1951.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Successful control of the artichoke plume moth in the Half Moon Bay area during experiments in 1949 and 1950 was reported in Californla Agriculture for September, 1951.
Drought survival of ponderosa: Pine seedlings treated with simulated dew survive by month nontreated controls in greenhouse tests
by E. C. Stone, H. A. Fowells
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: The ability of ponderosa pine seedlings to survive in dry soil–so dry that associated grasses and herbaceous vegetation die–may be due to an ability to absorb moisture through its leaves.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: The ability of ponderosa pine seedlings to survive in dry soil–so dry that associated grasses and herbaceous vegetation die–may be due to an ability to absorb moisture through its leaves.
Alkali soil reclamation tests: Experiments in Tulelake Basin show encouraging improvements in soil after treatment with gypsum
by K. G. Baghott, Warren Schoonover, James Quick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Results in the reclamation of alkali soils in the Tulelake Basin have demonstrated that bad alkali soils can be reclaimed–or improved–by the use of soil correctives, irrigation, and proper drainage.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Results in the reclamation of alkali soils in the Tulelake Basin have demonstrated that bad alkali soils can be reclaimed–or improved–by the use of soil correctives, irrigation, and proper drainage.
Sulfur in fertilizer programs: Long-term studies of influence of sulfur on navel orange production indicate no improvement in yield
by Winston W. Jones, Clarence B. Cree
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Most of the Washington navel orange production in California is on neutral to slightly alkaline soils.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Most of the Washington navel orange production in California is on neutral to slightly alkaline soils.
Valencia orange fruit size: Affected by the relation of calcium to magnesium as demonstrated by tests with nutrient solutions
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: The Valencia orange fruit size problem can not be ascribed to one and the same single cause in all citrus areas.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: The Valencia orange fruit size problem can not be ascribed to one and the same single cause in all citrus areas.
Control of cutworms on citrus: Infestations of pest in certain areas of southern California in May 1954 controlled by spray treatment
by E. Laurence Atkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Cutworms caused economic damage to citrus in the spring of 1954 in the Redlands-Pomona and Riverside-Arlington areas.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Cutworms caused economic damage to citrus in the spring of 1954 in the Redlands-Pomona and Riverside-Arlington areas.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 8, No.7

Mutual parasites of sheep and deer
July 1954
Volume 8, Number 7

Research articles

Fruit set in melon breeding: Hand pollination found to be less effective than pollination by honeybees in experiments at Davis
by Louis K. Mann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: That field-grown Powdery Mildew Resistant Cantaloupe No. 45 drops fewer pollinated flowers when insect-pollinated than when hand-pollinated was confirmed in a recent comparative study of fruit set on thinned vines.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: That field-grown Powdery Mildew Resistant Cantaloupe No. 45 drops fewer pollinated flowers when insect-pollinated than when hand-pollinated was confirmed in a recent comparative study of fruit set on thinned vines.
Walnut aphid investigations: Tests in northern California during the 1953 season stressed need for thorough treatment for control
by A. E. Michelbacher, Clarence Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Systemic insecticides have been extensively investigated for control of the walnut aphid at Linden for the past two years and in the Walnut Creek, Yuba City, and San Jose areas during 1953.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Systemic insecticides have been extensively investigated for control of the walnut aphid at Linden for the past two years and in the Walnut Creek, Yuba City, and San Jose areas during 1953.
Parasites of sheep and deer: Mutual parasites of domestic sheep and Columbian black-tailed deer studied for transference factors
by Norman F. Baker, James R. Douglas, William M. Longhurst
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Similar foraging habits of sheep and deer provide ample opportunity for transference of mutual parasites.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Similar foraging habits of sheep and deer provide ample opportunity for transference of mutual parasites.
Root fumigation: Carrot and beet roots used in tests for nematode control
by J. F. Harrington, H. K. Pratt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Seedsmen should never use carrot and beet roots infested with root knot nematode for transplanting into uninfested soil.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Seedsmen should never use carrot and beet roots infested with root knot nematode for transplanting into uninfested soil.
Artichoke plume moth damage: Large part of 1953–54 losses believed to be result of inadequate sanitation and cultural practices
by W. Harry Lange, R. H. Sciaroni, A. S. Greathead
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Successful control of the artichoke plume moth in the Half Moon Bay area during experiments in 1949 and 1950 was reported in Californla Agriculture for September, 1951.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Successful control of the artichoke plume moth in the Half Moon Bay area during experiments in 1949 and 1950 was reported in Californla Agriculture for September, 1951.
Drought survival of ponderosa: Pine seedlings treated with simulated dew survive by month nontreated controls in greenhouse tests
by E. C. Stone, H. A. Fowells
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: The ability of ponderosa pine seedlings to survive in dry soil–so dry that associated grasses and herbaceous vegetation die–may be due to an ability to absorb moisture through its leaves.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: The ability of ponderosa pine seedlings to survive in dry soil–so dry that associated grasses and herbaceous vegetation die–may be due to an ability to absorb moisture through its leaves.
Alkali soil reclamation tests: Experiments in Tulelake Basin show encouraging improvements in soil after treatment with gypsum
by K. G. Baghott, Warren Schoonover, James Quick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Results in the reclamation of alkali soils in the Tulelake Basin have demonstrated that bad alkali soils can be reclaimed–or improved–by the use of soil correctives, irrigation, and proper drainage.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Results in the reclamation of alkali soils in the Tulelake Basin have demonstrated that bad alkali soils can be reclaimed–or improved–by the use of soil correctives, irrigation, and proper drainage.
Sulfur in fertilizer programs: Long-term studies of influence of sulfur on navel orange production indicate no improvement in yield
by Winston W. Jones, Clarence B. Cree
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Most of the Washington navel orange production in California is on neutral to slightly alkaline soils.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Most of the Washington navel orange production in California is on neutral to slightly alkaline soils.
Valencia orange fruit size: Affected by the relation of calcium to magnesium as demonstrated by tests with nutrient solutions
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: The Valencia orange fruit size problem can not be ascribed to one and the same single cause in all citrus areas.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: The Valencia orange fruit size problem can not be ascribed to one and the same single cause in all citrus areas.
Control of cutworms on citrus: Infestations of pest in certain areas of southern California in May 1954 controlled by spray treatment
by E. Laurence Atkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Cutworms caused economic damage to citrus in the spring of 1954 in the Redlands-Pomona and Riverside-Arlington areas.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Cutworms caused economic damage to citrus in the spring of 1954 in the Redlands-Pomona and Riverside-Arlington areas.

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