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California Agriculture, Vol. 7, No.5

Fertilizer requirements in cotton production
May 1953
Volume 7, Number 5

Research articles

Mechanized cotton growing: Effects of mechanization on yield and quality studied in tests on planting, thinning, flaming and harvesting
by J. R. Tavernetti, H. F. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The experiments reported in this article were conducted co-operatively by the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engineering
The experiments reported in this article were conducted co-operatively by the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engineering
Cotton fertilizers: Kind and amount needed for best production studied in field tests
by D. S. Mikkelsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilization increased cotton yield in a series of experiments designed to determine the kind of fertilizer and—specifically—the amount of nitrogen necessary for maximum production on soils of the San Joaquín Valley.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilization increased cotton yield in a series of experiments designed to determine the kind of fertilizer and—specifically—the amount of nitrogen necessary for maximum production on soils of the San Joaquín Valley.
Spider mite on cotton: Under leaf coverage obtained with low volume, low pressure sprayers
by Gordon L. Smith, Herbert F. Miller, T. F. Leigh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A good underleaf spray coverage with contact acaricide achieved good control of spider mites on cotton in tests in the San Joaquín Valley.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A good underleaf spray coverage with contact acaricide achieved good control of spider mites on cotton in tests in the San Joaquín Valley.
Pest control by seed treatment: Wireworms and seed-corn maggots can be controlled by treating seed with lindane prior to planting
by W. H. Lange, E. C. Carlson, L. D. Leach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Seed treatment with lindane has proved to be an effective, economical and relatively safe method for the control of wireworms and the seed-corn maggot affecting germinating seeds of a number of vegetable and field crops.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Seed treatment with lindane has proved to be an effective, economical and relatively safe method for the control of wireworms and the seed-corn maggot affecting germinating seeds of a number of vegetable and field crops.
Grape leaf skeletonizer: Two parasites of the western skeletonizer colonized in successful search for natural enemies of pest
by Owen J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A small gregarious wasp—Apanteles, sp. “A”—and a tachinid fly—Sturmia harrisinae Coq.—which are natural enemies of the western grape leaf skeletonizer—Harrisina brillians B. & McD.— are firmly established in San Diego County.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A small gregarious wasp—Apanteles, sp. “A”—and a tachinid fly—Sturmia harrisinae Coq.—which are natural enemies of the western grape leaf skeletonizer—Harrisina brillians B. & McD.— are firmly established in San Diego County.
Thinning tokay grapes: Results of a study on the relationship of thinning practices to lugs shipped, total yield and net income
by Gordon F. Mitchell, Burt B. Burlinaame
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Results of a study during the 1952 season—with 103 vineyards, representing 3,333 acres, co-operating—show it pays to thin Tokay grapes.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Results of a study during the 1952 season—with 103 vineyards, representing 3,333 acres, co-operating—show it pays to thin Tokay grapes.
Landscaping for summer shade: Good planning uses cooling influence of plants to reduce summer temperatures in living areas
by R. B. Deering, F. A. Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 40% of the sun's heat can enter uninsulated houses through the roof but as a shadow—from overhead foliage or cover—moves over an area, the speed of cooling makes the newly shaded area immediately useful.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 40% of the sun's heat can enter uninsulated houses through the roof but as a shadow—from overhead foliage or cover—moves over an area, the speed of cooling makes the newly shaded area immediately useful.
Cracked stem of celery: Boric acid sprays reduced incidence of disorder in field trials with nitrogen and potash fertilization
by M. Yamaguchi, F. W. Zink, A. R. Spurr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Boric acid sprays can control the occurrence of cracked stem in certain varieties of celery which follows excessive applications of nitrogen and potash fertilizers—or potash alone, when the soil fertility is optimal.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Boric acid sprays can control the occurrence of cracked stem in certain varieties of celery which follows excessive applications of nitrogen and potash fertilizers—or potash alone, when the soil fertility is optimal.
Pre-packaged and bulk spinach: Survey of Berkeley housewives reveals buying practices and opinions on price and quality of spinach at retail
by Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nearly one half of the housewives— 47.5%—of the approximately one thousand interviewed in nine grocery stores in Berkeley in the summer of 1952 made a practice of buying fresh spinach at least once a month.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nearly one half of the housewives— 47.5%—of the approximately one thousand interviewed in nine grocery stores in Berkeley in the summer of 1952 made a practice of buying fresh spinach at least once a month.
Studies in pigeon nutrition: Addition of vitamin supplements to commercial pigeon ration investigated for effect on squab production
by Fred T. Shultr, C. R. Grau, Phyllis Zweigart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Production of marketable squabs increased after certain vitamins—important for reproduction by fowl—were added to a basal ration similar to commercial pigeon feed mixtures.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Production of marketable squabs increased after certain vitamins—important for reproduction by fowl—were added to a basal ration similar to commercial pigeon feed mixtures.
Sugar beet by-product tested: Alternate for molasses palatable to cows when mixed with concentrates and does not affect milk quality
by S. W. Mead, Albert Weber, Walter L. Dunkley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: No off-flavors were imparted to milk through feeding trials with a condensed beet solubles product—MC-47.
Not available – first paragraph follows: No off-flavors were imparted to milk through feeding trials with a condensed beet solubles product—MC-47.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 7, No.5

Fertilizer requirements in cotton production
May 1953
Volume 7, Number 5

Research articles

Mechanized cotton growing: Effects of mechanization on yield and quality studied in tests on planting, thinning, flaming and harvesting
by J. R. Tavernetti, H. F. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The experiments reported in this article were conducted co-operatively by the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engineering
The experiments reported in this article were conducted co-operatively by the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engineering
Cotton fertilizers: Kind and amount needed for best production studied in field tests
by D. S. Mikkelsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilization increased cotton yield in a series of experiments designed to determine the kind of fertilizer and—specifically—the amount of nitrogen necessary for maximum production on soils of the San Joaquín Valley.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilization increased cotton yield in a series of experiments designed to determine the kind of fertilizer and—specifically—the amount of nitrogen necessary for maximum production on soils of the San Joaquín Valley.
Spider mite on cotton: Under leaf coverage obtained with low volume, low pressure sprayers
by Gordon L. Smith, Herbert F. Miller, T. F. Leigh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A good underleaf spray coverage with contact acaricide achieved good control of spider mites on cotton in tests in the San Joaquín Valley.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A good underleaf spray coverage with contact acaricide achieved good control of spider mites on cotton in tests in the San Joaquín Valley.
Pest control by seed treatment: Wireworms and seed-corn maggots can be controlled by treating seed with lindane prior to planting
by W. H. Lange, E. C. Carlson, L. D. Leach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Seed treatment with lindane has proved to be an effective, economical and relatively safe method for the control of wireworms and the seed-corn maggot affecting germinating seeds of a number of vegetable and field crops.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Seed treatment with lindane has proved to be an effective, economical and relatively safe method for the control of wireworms and the seed-corn maggot affecting germinating seeds of a number of vegetable and field crops.
Grape leaf skeletonizer: Two parasites of the western skeletonizer colonized in successful search for natural enemies of pest
by Owen J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A small gregarious wasp—Apanteles, sp. “A”—and a tachinid fly—Sturmia harrisinae Coq.—which are natural enemies of the western grape leaf skeletonizer—Harrisina brillians B. & McD.— are firmly established in San Diego County.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A small gregarious wasp—Apanteles, sp. “A”—and a tachinid fly—Sturmia harrisinae Coq.—which are natural enemies of the western grape leaf skeletonizer—Harrisina brillians B. & McD.— are firmly established in San Diego County.
Thinning tokay grapes: Results of a study on the relationship of thinning practices to lugs shipped, total yield and net income
by Gordon F. Mitchell, Burt B. Burlinaame
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Results of a study during the 1952 season—with 103 vineyards, representing 3,333 acres, co-operating—show it pays to thin Tokay grapes.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Results of a study during the 1952 season—with 103 vineyards, representing 3,333 acres, co-operating—show it pays to thin Tokay grapes.
Landscaping for summer shade: Good planning uses cooling influence of plants to reduce summer temperatures in living areas
by R. B. Deering, F. A. Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 40% of the sun's heat can enter uninsulated houses through the roof but as a shadow—from overhead foliage or cover—moves over an area, the speed of cooling makes the newly shaded area immediately useful.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 40% of the sun's heat can enter uninsulated houses through the roof but as a shadow—from overhead foliage or cover—moves over an area, the speed of cooling makes the newly shaded area immediately useful.
Cracked stem of celery: Boric acid sprays reduced incidence of disorder in field trials with nitrogen and potash fertilization
by M. Yamaguchi, F. W. Zink, A. R. Spurr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Boric acid sprays can control the occurrence of cracked stem in certain varieties of celery which follows excessive applications of nitrogen and potash fertilizers—or potash alone, when the soil fertility is optimal.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Boric acid sprays can control the occurrence of cracked stem in certain varieties of celery which follows excessive applications of nitrogen and potash fertilizers—or potash alone, when the soil fertility is optimal.
Pre-packaged and bulk spinach: Survey of Berkeley housewives reveals buying practices and opinions on price and quality of spinach at retail
by Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nearly one half of the housewives— 47.5%—of the approximately one thousand interviewed in nine grocery stores in Berkeley in the summer of 1952 made a practice of buying fresh spinach at least once a month.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nearly one half of the housewives— 47.5%—of the approximately one thousand interviewed in nine grocery stores in Berkeley in the summer of 1952 made a practice of buying fresh spinach at least once a month.
Studies in pigeon nutrition: Addition of vitamin supplements to commercial pigeon ration investigated for effect on squab production
by Fred T. Shultr, C. R. Grau, Phyllis Zweigart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Production of marketable squabs increased after certain vitamins—important for reproduction by fowl—were added to a basal ration similar to commercial pigeon feed mixtures.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Production of marketable squabs increased after certain vitamins—important for reproduction by fowl—were added to a basal ration similar to commercial pigeon feed mixtures.
Sugar beet by-product tested: Alternate for molasses palatable to cows when mixed with concentrates and does not affect milk quality
by S. W. Mead, Albert Weber, Walter L. Dunkley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: No off-flavors were imparted to milk through feeding trials with a condensed beet solubles product—MC-47.
Not available – first paragraph follows: No off-flavors were imparted to milk through feeding trials with a condensed beet solubles product—MC-47.

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