California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

October 1953
Volume 7, Number 10

Research articles

Yellow dwarf disease: A new and damaging virus disease of cereals transmitted by aphids
by John W. Oswald, Byron R. Houston
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: First of two articles on a study of yellow dwarf of cereals in California
First of two articles on a study of yellow dwarf of cereals in California
California's wheat: Most of state's wheat of strains developed by backcross breeding
by Coit A. Suneson, Charles W. Schaller, Loren L. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A total of 15 improved backcrossed strains of popular wheat varieties were distributed in California between 1937 and 1950.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A total of 15 improved backcrossed strains of popular wheat varieties were distributed in California between 1937 and 1950.
Natural enemies of olive scale: Aggressive parasitic wasp promising as means of suppressing olive scale in California orchards
by R. L. Doutt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Reductions of 90% to 98.6% in olive scale populations in California orchards have been achieved by the use of natural enemies of the pest.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Reductions of 90% to 98.6% in olive scale populations in California orchards have been achieved by the use of natural enemies of the pest.
Stump grafting old citrus: Navel orange scions set fruit in fifth growing season following grafting to stumps old old seedling trees
by Ralph G. LaRue
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: After four growing seasons, thriving scions grafted into old seedling orange tree stumps demonstrated a way to rehabilitate orchards where the original variety is no longer profitable.
Not available – first paragraph follows: After four growing seasons, thriving scions grafted into old seedling orange tree stumps demonstrated a way to rehabilitate orchards where the original variety is no longer profitable.
Water spot on navel oranges: Only slight injury observed in orchards treated with parathion for California red scale control
by L. A. Riehl, G. E. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Water spot injury to navel oranges was less on trees treated with 25% parathion wettable powder than on trees sprayed with oil, in four observed orchards in Los Angeles County.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Water spot injury to navel oranges was less on trees treated with 25% parathion wettable powder than on trees sprayed with oil, in four observed orchards in Los Angeles County.
Lemon cuttings with fruit rooted: Means of prolonging useful life of lemon fruits developed at Riverside valuable aid in research
by Louis C. Erickson, Paul DeBach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Light green Eureka lemon fruits— with 1″ to 2″ stems—were rooted successfully in an experiment designed to develop a means of prolonging the useful life of lemon fruits for studies of a physiological, biochemical, and entomological nature.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Light green Eureka lemon fruits— with 1″ to 2″ stems—were rooted successfully in an experiment designed to develop a means of prolonging the useful life of lemon fruits for studies of a physiological, biochemical, and entomological nature.
Leaf drop in citrus: Excessive fall regardless of cause may lower soluble solids in fruit
by W. A. Rhoads, R. T. Wedding
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Excessive leaf drop of citrus—resulting from oil sprays, insect or mite damage, or physiological disorders—probably materially interferes with the total carbohydrate production of the tree, and may result in a lower level of total soluble solids in the fruit at harvest.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Excessive leaf drop of citrus—resulting from oil sprays, insect or mite damage, or physiological disorders—probably materially interferes with the total carbohydrate production of the tree, and may result in a lower level of total soluble solids in the fruit at harvest.
Systemic pesticides on walnut: Preliminary studies promising for control of European red mite and walnut aphid in southern California
by J. C. Ortega
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: European red mite and walnut aphid in the cool coastal regions of southern California may cause a premature dropping of walnut leaves, predisposing the nuts to sunburn injury and lowering the quality of the nut meats.
Not available – first paragraph follows: European red mite and walnut aphid in the cool coastal regions of southern California may cause a premature dropping of walnut leaves, predisposing the nuts to sunburn injury and lowering the quality of the nut meats.
Zutano avocado cuttincrs rooted: Leafy-twig cuttings of vigorous Mexican variety 'readily rooted without special procedures or hormone treatments
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Leafy-twig cuttings from the Zutano avocado—a vigorously growing Mexican variety—readily rooted, without special procedures or hormone treatment, in propagation trials at the Riverside Citrus Experiment Station.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Leafy-twig cuttings from the Zutano avocado—a vigorously growing Mexican variety—readily rooted, without special procedures or hormone treatment, in propagation trials at the Riverside Citrus Experiment Station.
Chlorosis in ornamentals: Control of lime-induced chlorosis by soil applications of chelated iron can be effective
by A. Wallace, C. P. North, A. M. Kofranek, O. R. Lunt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Thousands of chlorotic trees and shrubs—on lime soil in southern California—can be made to become green by soil applications of iron-containing chelates.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Thousands of chlorotic trees and shrubs—on lime soil in southern California—can be made to become green by soil applications of iron-containing chelates.
Rooting bed test: Soil conditioner in nursing bed eased chrysanthemum transplanting
by Edward J. Bowles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A synthetic soil conditioner, CRD-186—Krilium—was tested in rooting beds of commercially grown chrysanthemums for its influence on total root growth and the transplant operation.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A synthetic soil conditioner, CRD-186—Krilium—was tested in rooting beds of commercially grown chrysanthemums for its influence on total root growth and the transplant operation.
Harvesting sutter pink beans: Effects of field exposure on change of color may be reduced by early harvesting and threshing
by Francis L. Smith, John H. Lindt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Browning in the Suffer Pink bean—resulting in a lower selling price—can be reduced by early harvest and threshing but at the expense of bean size and yield.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Browning in the Suffer Pink bean—resulting in a lower selling price—can be reduced by early harvest and threshing but at the expense of bean size and yield.
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=7_10

October 1953
Volume 7, Number 10

Research articles

Yellow dwarf disease: A new and damaging virus disease of cereals transmitted by aphids
by John W. Oswald, Byron R. Houston
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: First of two articles on a study of yellow dwarf of cereals in California
First of two articles on a study of yellow dwarf of cereals in California
California's wheat: Most of state's wheat of strains developed by backcross breeding
by Coit A. Suneson, Charles W. Schaller, Loren L. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A total of 15 improved backcrossed strains of popular wheat varieties were distributed in California between 1937 and 1950.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A total of 15 improved backcrossed strains of popular wheat varieties were distributed in California between 1937 and 1950.
Natural enemies of olive scale: Aggressive parasitic wasp promising as means of suppressing olive scale in California orchards
by R. L. Doutt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Reductions of 90% to 98.6% in olive scale populations in California orchards have been achieved by the use of natural enemies of the pest.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Reductions of 90% to 98.6% in olive scale populations in California orchards have been achieved by the use of natural enemies of the pest.
Stump grafting old citrus: Navel orange scions set fruit in fifth growing season following grafting to stumps old old seedling trees
by Ralph G. LaRue
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: After four growing seasons, thriving scions grafted into old seedling orange tree stumps demonstrated a way to rehabilitate orchards where the original variety is no longer profitable.
Not available – first paragraph follows: After four growing seasons, thriving scions grafted into old seedling orange tree stumps demonstrated a way to rehabilitate orchards where the original variety is no longer profitable.
Water spot on navel oranges: Only slight injury observed in orchards treated with parathion for California red scale control
by L. A. Riehl, G. E. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Water spot injury to navel oranges was less on trees treated with 25% parathion wettable powder than on trees sprayed with oil, in four observed orchards in Los Angeles County.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Water spot injury to navel oranges was less on trees treated with 25% parathion wettable powder than on trees sprayed with oil, in four observed orchards in Los Angeles County.
Lemon cuttings with fruit rooted: Means of prolonging useful life of lemon fruits developed at Riverside valuable aid in research
by Louis C. Erickson, Paul DeBach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Light green Eureka lemon fruits— with 1″ to 2″ stems—were rooted successfully in an experiment designed to develop a means of prolonging the useful life of lemon fruits for studies of a physiological, biochemical, and entomological nature.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Light green Eureka lemon fruits— with 1″ to 2″ stems—were rooted successfully in an experiment designed to develop a means of prolonging the useful life of lemon fruits for studies of a physiological, biochemical, and entomological nature.
Leaf drop in citrus: Excessive fall regardless of cause may lower soluble solids in fruit
by W. A. Rhoads, R. T. Wedding
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Excessive leaf drop of citrus—resulting from oil sprays, insect or mite damage, or physiological disorders—probably materially interferes with the total carbohydrate production of the tree, and may result in a lower level of total soluble solids in the fruit at harvest.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Excessive leaf drop of citrus—resulting from oil sprays, insect or mite damage, or physiological disorders—probably materially interferes with the total carbohydrate production of the tree, and may result in a lower level of total soluble solids in the fruit at harvest.
Systemic pesticides on walnut: Preliminary studies promising for control of European red mite and walnut aphid in southern California
by J. C. Ortega
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: European red mite and walnut aphid in the cool coastal regions of southern California may cause a premature dropping of walnut leaves, predisposing the nuts to sunburn injury and lowering the quality of the nut meats.
Not available – first paragraph follows: European red mite and walnut aphid in the cool coastal regions of southern California may cause a premature dropping of walnut leaves, predisposing the nuts to sunburn injury and lowering the quality of the nut meats.
Zutano avocado cuttincrs rooted: Leafy-twig cuttings of vigorous Mexican variety 'readily rooted without special procedures or hormone treatments
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Leafy-twig cuttings from the Zutano avocado—a vigorously growing Mexican variety—readily rooted, without special procedures or hormone treatment, in propagation trials at the Riverside Citrus Experiment Station.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Leafy-twig cuttings from the Zutano avocado—a vigorously growing Mexican variety—readily rooted, without special procedures or hormone treatment, in propagation trials at the Riverside Citrus Experiment Station.
Chlorosis in ornamentals: Control of lime-induced chlorosis by soil applications of chelated iron can be effective
by A. Wallace, C. P. North, A. M. Kofranek, O. R. Lunt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Thousands of chlorotic trees and shrubs—on lime soil in southern California—can be made to become green by soil applications of iron-containing chelates.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Thousands of chlorotic trees and shrubs—on lime soil in southern California—can be made to become green by soil applications of iron-containing chelates.
Rooting bed test: Soil conditioner in nursing bed eased chrysanthemum transplanting
by Edward J. Bowles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A synthetic soil conditioner, CRD-186—Krilium—was tested in rooting beds of commercially grown chrysanthemums for its influence on total root growth and the transplant operation.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A synthetic soil conditioner, CRD-186—Krilium—was tested in rooting beds of commercially grown chrysanthemums for its influence on total root growth and the transplant operation.
Harvesting sutter pink beans: Effects of field exposure on change of color may be reduced by early harvesting and threshing
by Francis L. Smith, John H. Lindt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Browning in the Suffer Pink bean—resulting in a lower selling price—can be reduced by early harvest and threshing but at the expense of bean size and yield.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Browning in the Suffer Pink bean—resulting in a lower selling price—can be reduced by early harvest and threshing but at the expense of bean size and yield.

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/