California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 6, No.7

Forage plants on California ranges
July 1952
Volume 6, Number 7

Research articles

California range plants: Key to improvement is knowledge and proper use of three easily distinguishable types of range plants
by Merton R. Love, Dorman C. Sumner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Range improvement means replacing undesirable plants with a more desirable type of forage.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Range improvement means replacing undesirable plants with a more desirable type of forage.
Dustywings on citrus: These natural enemies of mites and scales may be helped by miticides but are killed by insecticides
by C. A. Fleschner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Dustywings—natural enemies of citrus mites and scales—need their prey as well as honeydew-secreting insects to survive.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Dustywings—natural enemies of citrus mites and scales—need their prey as well as honeydew-secreting insects to survive.
Fumigation of walnuts: Southern California packing house tests show control of navel orangeworm and Mediterranean flour moth larvae
by Paul D. Gerhardt, David L. Lindgren, Walton B. Sinclair
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Methyl bromide fumigation applied to walnuts under packing-house conditions killed navel orangeworm and Mediterranean flour moth larvae without leaving harmful residues in the fumigated walnut meat.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Methyl bromide fumigation applied to walnuts under packing-house conditions killed navel orangeworm and Mediterranean flour moth larvae without leaving harmful residues in the fumigated walnut meat.
Packaging meat for lockers: Wrapping time cut 42% in pilot time-and-motion study of practices of frozen food locker operators
by Louis E. Davis, Richard A. Marks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following report is based upon a survey undertaken at the request of Division 01 Food Technology, University of California College of Agriculture.
The following report is based upon a survey undertaken at the request of Division 01 Food Technology, University of California College of Agriculture.
Efficiency in fruit marketing: Grading costs may be reduced about 25% for pears and over 50% for apples by applying operating standards
by R. G. Bressler, B. C. French
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part II of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packing-house equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs made co-operatively by the University of California Guanine Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act, Detailed reports in mimeograph form are available by addressing a request to Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4. Following reports in this series will compare house operations, methods, equipment, and arrangements. The comparisons may be used to establish standards for efficient operation. Kith minor modifications, the results of these studies can be applied to many of the problems of parking and processing other fruits and vegetables.
Part II of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packing-house equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs made co-operatively by the University of California Guanine Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act, Detailed reports in mimeograph form are available by addressing a request to Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4. Following reports in this series will compare house operations, methods, equipment, and arrangements. The comparisons may be used to establish standards for efficient operation. Kith minor modifications, the results of these studies can be applied to many of the problems of parking and processing other fruits and vegetables.
Avocado variety trials: Progress report describes tree and fruit characteristics of four most promising varieties in test at Riverside
by M. M. Winslow
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Four avocado varieties—in an experimental orchard of 36 varieties at Riverside—appear to be promising for commercial plantings.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Four avocado varieties—in an experimental orchard of 36 varieties at Riverside—appear to be promising for commercial plantings.
Stink bug on tomatoes: Injury and its prevention investigated in last season's outbreak in Yolo and Sacramento counties
by A. E. Michelbacher, W. W. Middlekauff, O. G. Bacon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Several tomato fields in California showed severe stink bug damage this past season.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Several tomato fields in California showed severe stink bug damage this past season.
Oriental fruitfly parasites: Biological control of damaging pest established in Hawaii diminishes threat to mainland's fruit production
by Robert Van Den Bosch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The oriental fruitfly threat to California's fruit industry has been reduced by the successful establishment in Hawaii of natural enemies of the pest.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The oriental fruitfly threat to California's fruit industry has been reduced by the successful establishment in Hawaii of natural enemies of the pest.
Organic wastes for mulch: Waste from packing houses processing organic materials studied for possible agricultural use
by E. L. Proebsting
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: End-product wastes of some industries which process different types of organic materials are desirable as mulching materials in agricultural practice.
Not available – first paragraph follows: End-product wastes of some industries which process different types of organic materials are desirable as mulching materials in agricultural practice.
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=6_7

California Agriculture, Vol. 6, No.7

Forage plants on California ranges
July 1952
Volume 6, Number 7

Research articles

California range plants: Key to improvement is knowledge and proper use of three easily distinguishable types of range plants
by Merton R. Love, Dorman C. Sumner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Range improvement means replacing undesirable plants with a more desirable type of forage.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Range improvement means replacing undesirable plants with a more desirable type of forage.
Dustywings on citrus: These natural enemies of mites and scales may be helped by miticides but are killed by insecticides
by C. A. Fleschner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Dustywings—natural enemies of citrus mites and scales—need their prey as well as honeydew-secreting insects to survive.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Dustywings—natural enemies of citrus mites and scales—need their prey as well as honeydew-secreting insects to survive.
Fumigation of walnuts: Southern California packing house tests show control of navel orangeworm and Mediterranean flour moth larvae
by Paul D. Gerhardt, David L. Lindgren, Walton B. Sinclair
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Methyl bromide fumigation applied to walnuts under packing-house conditions killed navel orangeworm and Mediterranean flour moth larvae without leaving harmful residues in the fumigated walnut meat.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Methyl bromide fumigation applied to walnuts under packing-house conditions killed navel orangeworm and Mediterranean flour moth larvae without leaving harmful residues in the fumigated walnut meat.
Packaging meat for lockers: Wrapping time cut 42% in pilot time-and-motion study of practices of frozen food locker operators
by Louis E. Davis, Richard A. Marks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following report is based upon a survey undertaken at the request of Division 01 Food Technology, University of California College of Agriculture.
The following report is based upon a survey undertaken at the request of Division 01 Food Technology, University of California College of Agriculture.
Efficiency in fruit marketing: Grading costs may be reduced about 25% for pears and over 50% for apples by applying operating standards
by R. G. Bressler, B. C. French
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part II of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packing-house equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs made co-operatively by the University of California Guanine Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act, Detailed reports in mimeograph form are available by addressing a request to Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4. Following reports in this series will compare house operations, methods, equipment, and arrangements. The comparisons may be used to establish standards for efficient operation. Kith minor modifications, the results of these studies can be applied to many of the problems of parking and processing other fruits and vegetables.
Part II of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packing-house equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs made co-operatively by the University of California Guanine Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act, Detailed reports in mimeograph form are available by addressing a request to Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4. Following reports in this series will compare house operations, methods, equipment, and arrangements. The comparisons may be used to establish standards for efficient operation. Kith minor modifications, the results of these studies can be applied to many of the problems of parking and processing other fruits and vegetables.
Avocado variety trials: Progress report describes tree and fruit characteristics of four most promising varieties in test at Riverside
by M. M. Winslow
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Four avocado varieties—in an experimental orchard of 36 varieties at Riverside—appear to be promising for commercial plantings.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Four avocado varieties—in an experimental orchard of 36 varieties at Riverside—appear to be promising for commercial plantings.
Stink bug on tomatoes: Injury and its prevention investigated in last season's outbreak in Yolo and Sacramento counties
by A. E. Michelbacher, W. W. Middlekauff, O. G. Bacon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Several tomato fields in California showed severe stink bug damage this past season.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Several tomato fields in California showed severe stink bug damage this past season.
Oriental fruitfly parasites: Biological control of damaging pest established in Hawaii diminishes threat to mainland's fruit production
by Robert Van Den Bosch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The oriental fruitfly threat to California's fruit industry has been reduced by the successful establishment in Hawaii of natural enemies of the pest.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The oriental fruitfly threat to California's fruit industry has been reduced by the successful establishment in Hawaii of natural enemies of the pest.
Organic wastes for mulch: Waste from packing houses processing organic materials studied for possible agricultural use
by E. L. Proebsting
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: End-product wastes of some industries which process different types of organic materials are desirable as mulching materials in agricultural practice.
Not available – first paragraph follows: End-product wastes of some industries which process different types of organic materials are desirable as mulching materials in agricultural practice.

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/