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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.6

Bacillus for control of alfalfa caterpillar
June 1951
Volume 5, Number 6

Research articles

Sugar beets and climate: Effects of night and day temperature and day length on beet growth and sugar production investigated
by Albert Ulrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The importance of climate on the raising of a bumper crop of sugar beets is being studied in controlled climate experiments in the laboratory.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The importance of climate on the raising of a bumper crop of sugar beets is being studied in controlled climate experiments in the laboratory.
Control of orangeworms: Cryolite, DDD, parathion found most effective against four main species of orangeworms in southern California
by E. Laurence Atkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Orangeworm is the term used for the larvae or caterpillars of several species of small moths damaging citrus in certain areas of southern California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Orangeworm is the term used for the larvae or caterpillars of several species of small moths damaging citrus in certain areas of southern California.
Pest control by bacteria: Alfalfa caterpillar in field reduced to sub-economic levels within two days by bacillus applied as spray
by Edward A. Steinhaus
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A spore-forming bacterium–Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner–successfully reduced populations of the alfalfa caterpillar to below the economic level in field tests near Dos Palos.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A spore-forming bacterium–Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner–successfully reduced populations of the alfalfa caterpillar to below the economic level in field tests near Dos Palos.
Nitrogen needs of citrus: Losses caused by leaching and volatilization can be reduced by management and irrigation practices
by H. D. Chapman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilizer bills for citrus in California can be reduced by application of frequent small doses of nitrogen to the irrigation water, use of low head sprinkler irrigation, noncultivation, and making neutral and alkaline soils slightly more acid.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilizer bills for citrus in California can be reduced by application of frequent small doses of nitrogen to the irrigation water, use of low head sprinkler irrigation, noncultivation, and making neutral and alkaline soils slightly more acid.
District pipe systems: Concrete irrigation systems compared in study of efficiency of open, closed, and semi-closed types
by Arthur F. Pillsbury
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Surging can' be minimized in future designs in the open system of concrete pipe irrigation but the closed and semi-closed types–where surging is no problem–have much to offer.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Surging can' be minimized in future designs in the open system of concrete pipe irrigation but the closed and semi-closed types–where surging is no problem–have much to offer.
Nitrogen on cantaloupes: Fertilization tends to increase fruit size and reduce culls but does not affect mosaic infection and yield
by F. W. Zink, G. N. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Heavy nitrogen fertilization of cantaloupes does not lessen the severity of infection caused by the mosaic virus, nor does it increase the yield of marketable fruit. It increases cantaloupe size and reduces the number of culled fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Heavy nitrogen fertilization of cantaloupes does not lessen the severity of infection caused by the mosaic virus, nor does it increase the yield of marketable fruit. It increases cantaloupe size and reduces the number of culled fruit.
Mastitis control: Proper management of herd most important in successful program
by O. W. Schalm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Mastitis in dairy herds can be significantly reduced by proper management.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Mastitis in dairy herds can be significantly reduced by proper management.
Deciduous character of pepper: Tiny fruited form is crossed with non-deciduous variety to get easy-to-pick pepper for commercial use
by Paul G. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deciduous ripe fruit character in peppers, which allows the fruit to be picked while the stem remains on the plant, was inherited in a cross of a tiny fruited Chili Piquin with large but non-deciduous varieties.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deciduous ripe fruit character in peppers, which allows the fruit to be picked while the stem remains on the plant, was inherited in a cross of a tiny fruited Chili Piquin with large but non-deciduous varieties.
Use of fire in land clearing: Proper ignition techniques important requirements for successful management of controlled burns
by Keith Arnold, L. T. Burcham, Ralph L. Fenner, R. F. Grah
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The fourth of five articles reporting the findings in investigations in the effectiveness, the safety and the cost of the use of controlled burning as a tool for land clearing.s No attempt is made to provide one formula for prescribed burning in California; each fire is an individual case to be planned on the ground.
The fourth of five articles reporting the findings in investigations in the effectiveness, the safety and the cost of the use of controlled burning as a tool for land clearing.s No attempt is made to provide one formula for prescribed burning in California; each fire is an individual case to be planned on the ground.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.6

Bacillus for control of alfalfa caterpillar
June 1951
Volume 5, Number 6

Research articles

Sugar beets and climate: Effects of night and day temperature and day length on beet growth and sugar production investigated
by Albert Ulrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The importance of climate on the raising of a bumper crop of sugar beets is being studied in controlled climate experiments in the laboratory.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The importance of climate on the raising of a bumper crop of sugar beets is being studied in controlled climate experiments in the laboratory.
Control of orangeworms: Cryolite, DDD, parathion found most effective against four main species of orangeworms in southern California
by E. Laurence Atkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Orangeworm is the term used for the larvae or caterpillars of several species of small moths damaging citrus in certain areas of southern California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Orangeworm is the term used for the larvae or caterpillars of several species of small moths damaging citrus in certain areas of southern California.
Pest control by bacteria: Alfalfa caterpillar in field reduced to sub-economic levels within two days by bacillus applied as spray
by Edward A. Steinhaus
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A spore-forming bacterium–Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner–successfully reduced populations of the alfalfa caterpillar to below the economic level in field tests near Dos Palos.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A spore-forming bacterium–Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner–successfully reduced populations of the alfalfa caterpillar to below the economic level in field tests near Dos Palos.
Nitrogen needs of citrus: Losses caused by leaching and volatilization can be reduced by management and irrigation practices
by H. D. Chapman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilizer bills for citrus in California can be reduced by application of frequent small doses of nitrogen to the irrigation water, use of low head sprinkler irrigation, noncultivation, and making neutral and alkaline soils slightly more acid.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilizer bills for citrus in California can be reduced by application of frequent small doses of nitrogen to the irrigation water, use of low head sprinkler irrigation, noncultivation, and making neutral and alkaline soils slightly more acid.
District pipe systems: Concrete irrigation systems compared in study of efficiency of open, closed, and semi-closed types
by Arthur F. Pillsbury
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Surging can' be minimized in future designs in the open system of concrete pipe irrigation but the closed and semi-closed types–where surging is no problem–have much to offer.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Surging can' be minimized in future designs in the open system of concrete pipe irrigation but the closed and semi-closed types–where surging is no problem–have much to offer.
Nitrogen on cantaloupes: Fertilization tends to increase fruit size and reduce culls but does not affect mosaic infection and yield
by F. W. Zink, G. N. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Heavy nitrogen fertilization of cantaloupes does not lessen the severity of infection caused by the mosaic virus, nor does it increase the yield of marketable fruit. It increases cantaloupe size and reduces the number of culled fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Heavy nitrogen fertilization of cantaloupes does not lessen the severity of infection caused by the mosaic virus, nor does it increase the yield of marketable fruit. It increases cantaloupe size and reduces the number of culled fruit.
Mastitis control: Proper management of herd most important in successful program
by O. W. Schalm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Mastitis in dairy herds can be significantly reduced by proper management.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Mastitis in dairy herds can be significantly reduced by proper management.
Deciduous character of pepper: Tiny fruited form is crossed with non-deciduous variety to get easy-to-pick pepper for commercial use
by Paul G. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deciduous ripe fruit character in peppers, which allows the fruit to be picked while the stem remains on the plant, was inherited in a cross of a tiny fruited Chili Piquin with large but non-deciduous varieties.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deciduous ripe fruit character in peppers, which allows the fruit to be picked while the stem remains on the plant, was inherited in a cross of a tiny fruited Chili Piquin with large but non-deciduous varieties.
Use of fire in land clearing: Proper ignition techniques important requirements for successful management of controlled burns
by Keith Arnold, L. T. Burcham, Ralph L. Fenner, R. F. Grah
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The fourth of five articles reporting the findings in investigations in the effectiveness, the safety and the cost of the use of controlled burning as a tool for land clearing.s No attempt is made to provide one formula for prescribed burning in California; each fire is an individual case to be planned on the ground.
The fourth of five articles reporting the findings in investigations in the effectiveness, the safety and the cost of the use of controlled burning as a tool for land clearing.s No attempt is made to provide one formula for prescribed burning in California; each fire is an individual case to be planned on the ground.

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