California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.4

Citrus quick decline transmission studies
April 1951
Volume 5, Number 4

Research articles

Apricot harvest predictable: Method of reliable forecast five to ten weeks before harvest an aid in merchandising fruit at right time
by Reid M. Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The harvesting date of Blenheim or Royal apricots in Contra Costa County has been predicted within two days 50% of the time, and within four days every season in a 17-year experiment at Brent-wood. In two years the predicted and actual harvest date were the same.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The harvesting date of Blenheim or Royal apricots in Contra Costa County has been predicted within two days 50% of the time, and within four days every season in a 17-year experiment at Brent-wood. In two years the predicted and actual harvest date were the same.
Walnut pest studies, 1950: Conventional and air carrier sprayers compared in codling moth and aphid control for northern California
by A. E. Michelbacher, O. G. Bacon, Woodrow W. Middlekauff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Efficiency of the codling moth and aphid control program depends to some extent on the type of sprayer used.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Efficiency of the codling moth and aphid control program depends to some extent on the type of sprayer used.
Quick decline virus: Transmission tests indict the melon aphid as one vector of the disease
by R. C. Dickson, R. A. Flock, M. McD. Johnso
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The virus of citrus quick decline is transmitted by the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The virus of citrus quick decline is transmitted by the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover.
Current economic research: Agricultural economic studies cover farm management, conservation, marketing, commodity analyses
by Sidney Hoos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Current research projects in agricultural economics are planned to provide adequate bases for constructive decisions pertaining to agriculture.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Current research projects in agricultural economics are planned to provide adequate bases for constructive decisions pertaining to agriculture.
Use of fire in land clearing: Selection and preparation of the area to be cleared by planned application and confinement of fire important
by Keith Arnold, L. T. Burcham, Ralph L. Fenner, R. F. Grah
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The second of five articles reporting the findings in investigations in the effectiveness, the safety and the cost of the use of controlled burning as a tool for land clearing. No attempt is made to provide one formula for prescribed burning in California; each fire is an individual case to be planned at site of burn.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The second of five articles reporting the findings in investigations in the effectiveness, the safety and the cost of the use of controlled burning as a tool for land clearing. No attempt is made to provide one formula for prescribed burning in California; each fire is an individual case to be planned at site of burn.
Greenhouse roses: Control of powdery mildew and rust on certain varieties in bay area
by Neil Allan Maclean, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew and rust are common and serious diseases of certain varieties of greenhouse-grown roses in the Bay Area of California during the late spring and summer seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew and rust are common and serious diseases of certain varieties of greenhouse-grown roses in the Bay Area of California during the late spring and summer seasons.
Chrysanthemum pests: New chemicals promising against two-spotted spider mite and aphids
by A. Earl Pritchard, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The two-spotted spider mite is a constant threat to chrysanthemums–especially under cloth-house conditions in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties where nearly two millon dollars worth are grown annually.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The two-spotted spider mite is a constant threat to chrysanthemums–especially under cloth-house conditions in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties where nearly two millon dollars worth are grown annually.
Mites on cotton: Control of spider mites varies with species attacking the plants
by Gordon L. Smith, Douglas E. Bryan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites on cotton– the Atlantic mite, Tetranychus atlanticus McG.; the Pacific mite, T. pacificus McG.; the two-spotted mite, T. bimaculatus Harvey should be controlled by killing the mites in their overwintering stages on winter and spring host plants and on the ground.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites on cotton– the Atlantic mite, Tetranychus atlanticus McG.; the Pacific mite, T. pacificus McG.; the two-spotted mite, T. bimaculatus Harvey should be controlled by killing the mites in their overwintering stages on winter and spring host plants and on the ground.
Raisins for turkeys: Fed at will with no harmful effects on growth and quality
by F. H. Kratzer, D. E. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Raisins may replace 30% of the grain portion, or 16% of the entire ration for turkeys in the late growing periods without markedly affecting the gains in body weight, efficiency of gain or market grade of the birds.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Raisins may replace 30% of the grain portion, or 16% of the entire ration for turkeys in the late growing periods without markedly affecting the gains in body weight, efficiency of gain or market grade of the birds.
Correction
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.4

Citrus quick decline transmission studies
April 1951
Volume 5, Number 4

Research articles

Apricot harvest predictable: Method of reliable forecast five to ten weeks before harvest an aid in merchandising fruit at right time
by Reid M. Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The harvesting date of Blenheim or Royal apricots in Contra Costa County has been predicted within two days 50% of the time, and within four days every season in a 17-year experiment at Brent-wood. In two years the predicted and actual harvest date were the same.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The harvesting date of Blenheim or Royal apricots in Contra Costa County has been predicted within two days 50% of the time, and within four days every season in a 17-year experiment at Brent-wood. In two years the predicted and actual harvest date were the same.
Walnut pest studies, 1950: Conventional and air carrier sprayers compared in codling moth and aphid control for northern California
by A. E. Michelbacher, O. G. Bacon, Woodrow W. Middlekauff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Efficiency of the codling moth and aphid control program depends to some extent on the type of sprayer used.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Efficiency of the codling moth and aphid control program depends to some extent on the type of sprayer used.
Quick decline virus: Transmission tests indict the melon aphid as one vector of the disease
by R. C. Dickson, R. A. Flock, M. McD. Johnso
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The virus of citrus quick decline is transmitted by the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The virus of citrus quick decline is transmitted by the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover.
Current economic research: Agricultural economic studies cover farm management, conservation, marketing, commodity analyses
by Sidney Hoos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Current research projects in agricultural economics are planned to provide adequate bases for constructive decisions pertaining to agriculture.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Current research projects in agricultural economics are planned to provide adequate bases for constructive decisions pertaining to agriculture.
Use of fire in land clearing: Selection and preparation of the area to be cleared by planned application and confinement of fire important
by Keith Arnold, L. T. Burcham, Ralph L. Fenner, R. F. Grah
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The second of five articles reporting the findings in investigations in the effectiveness, the safety and the cost of the use of controlled burning as a tool for land clearing. No attempt is made to provide one formula for prescribed burning in California; each fire is an individual case to be planned at site of burn.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The second of five articles reporting the findings in investigations in the effectiveness, the safety and the cost of the use of controlled burning as a tool for land clearing. No attempt is made to provide one formula for prescribed burning in California; each fire is an individual case to be planned at site of burn.
Greenhouse roses: Control of powdery mildew and rust on certain varieties in bay area
by Neil Allan Maclean, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew and rust are common and serious diseases of certain varieties of greenhouse-grown roses in the Bay Area of California during the late spring and summer seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew and rust are common and serious diseases of certain varieties of greenhouse-grown roses in the Bay Area of California during the late spring and summer seasons.
Chrysanthemum pests: New chemicals promising against two-spotted spider mite and aphids
by A. Earl Pritchard, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The two-spotted spider mite is a constant threat to chrysanthemums–especially under cloth-house conditions in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties where nearly two millon dollars worth are grown annually.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The two-spotted spider mite is a constant threat to chrysanthemums–especially under cloth-house conditions in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties where nearly two millon dollars worth are grown annually.
Mites on cotton: Control of spider mites varies with species attacking the plants
by Gordon L. Smith, Douglas E. Bryan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites on cotton– the Atlantic mite, Tetranychus atlanticus McG.; the Pacific mite, T. pacificus McG.; the two-spotted mite, T. bimaculatus Harvey should be controlled by killing the mites in their overwintering stages on winter and spring host plants and on the ground.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites on cotton– the Atlantic mite, Tetranychus atlanticus McG.; the Pacific mite, T. pacificus McG.; the two-spotted mite, T. bimaculatus Harvey should be controlled by killing the mites in their overwintering stages on winter and spring host plants and on the ground.
Raisins for turkeys: Fed at will with no harmful effects on growth and quality
by F. H. Kratzer, D. E. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Raisins may replace 30% of the grain portion, or 16% of the entire ration for turkeys in the late growing periods without markedly affecting the gains in body weight, efficiency of gain or market grade of the birds.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Raisins may replace 30% of the grain portion, or 16% of the entire ration for turkeys in the late growing periods without markedly affecting the gains in body weight, efficiency of gain or market grade of the birds.
Correction
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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