California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 50, No.6

Celebrating 50 Years: 1946-1996
Cover:  A sampling of California Agriculture covers. Photo by Suzanne Paisley.
November-December 1996
Volume 50, Number 6

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Crew workers split between hourly and piece-rate pay
by Gregory Encina Billikopf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Crew workers can enhance their wages with piece-rate pay, but many prefer hourly pay.
When properly managed, piece-rate pay can result in enhanced wages for crew workers and increased productivity for growers. Despite the benefits of piece rate, crew workers were evenly divided between those who favor hourly pay and those who prefer piece-rate pay. Crew worker concern about how piece rates are determined played a key role in the unexpectedly low preference for piece rate. Suggestions are offered for establishing piece rates as pay incentives.
Vegetables, fruits and nuts account for 95% of organic sales in California
by Karen Klonsky, Laura Tourte
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Organic farming is conservatively estimated to be a $75 million industry in California, producing more than 70 commodities.
A total of 1,159 organic farmers sold over 70 individual commodities, grossing $75.4 million from 45,493 producing (physical) acres in 1992–93. All but 5% of the growers raised some fruit, nut or vegetable crop. Organic production in California is highly concentrated: The largest 7% of organic farms claimed three-fourths of the total gross sales, while half of the farms were smaller than 5 acres with annual sales of under $7,500.
Radio is effective in teaching nutrition to Latino families
by Joan Wright, Eunice Romero-Gwynn, Anne Cotter, Carol Powell, Constance Garrett, Myriam Grajales-Hall, Saundra Parnell, Gwendolyn Stanford, Barbara Turner, Norma Wightman, Eunice Williamson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Latino-Americans showed improved nutrition knowledge and food-buying and preparation practices after listening to nutrition lessons on Spanish-language radio.
A series of five nutrition education lessons was broadcast over Spanish-language radio in a major metropolitan and a semirural area of southern California. Pre- and postbroadcast interviews with a random sample of enrollees were used to examine differences in nutrition-related knowledge, practices, and frequency of eating selected foods. In both broadcast locations, knowledge and practice gains were significant, but reported food-frequency patterns did not reflect change. Listeners liked the lessons and home-study guides, and identified specific ways they had applied the information. Spanish-language radio appears to be an effective medium to deliver nutrition education to Latinos.
“Resistance-breaking” nematodes identified in California tomatoes
by Isgouhi Kaloshian, Valerie M. Williamson, Gene Miyao, Dennis A. Lawn, Becky B. Westerdahl
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New strains of root-knot nematodes have been attacking tomato plants containing the Mi gene, which were once resistant to the pest.
Resistance to root-knot nematodes in tomato is conferred by the gene Mi. We have identified two field populations of Meloidogyne incognita that parasitize tomato plants containing the Mi gene. This necessitates the use of planned crop rotation practices and the incorporation of other resistance genes into cultivated tomato.
50 Years: California Agriculture
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Division changes with the needs of Californians
by W.R. Gomes
Full text HTML  | PDF  
UCB Library to preserve ag literature
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Letter
by Kimberly A. Crum, Karen Watts
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 50, No.6

Celebrating 50 Years: 1946-1996
Cover:  A sampling of California Agriculture covers. Photo by Suzanne Paisley.
November-December 1996
Volume 50, Number 6

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Crew workers split between hourly and piece-rate pay
by Gregory Encina Billikopf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Crew workers can enhance their wages with piece-rate pay, but many prefer hourly pay.
When properly managed, piece-rate pay can result in enhanced wages for crew workers and increased productivity for growers. Despite the benefits of piece rate, crew workers were evenly divided between those who favor hourly pay and those who prefer piece-rate pay. Crew worker concern about how piece rates are determined played a key role in the unexpectedly low preference for piece rate. Suggestions are offered for establishing piece rates as pay incentives.
Vegetables, fruits and nuts account for 95% of organic sales in California
by Karen Klonsky, Laura Tourte
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Organic farming is conservatively estimated to be a $75 million industry in California, producing more than 70 commodities.
A total of 1,159 organic farmers sold over 70 individual commodities, grossing $75.4 million from 45,493 producing (physical) acres in 1992–93. All but 5% of the growers raised some fruit, nut or vegetable crop. Organic production in California is highly concentrated: The largest 7% of organic farms claimed three-fourths of the total gross sales, while half of the farms were smaller than 5 acres with annual sales of under $7,500.
Radio is effective in teaching nutrition to Latino families
by Joan Wright, Eunice Romero-Gwynn, Anne Cotter, Carol Powell, Constance Garrett, Myriam Grajales-Hall, Saundra Parnell, Gwendolyn Stanford, Barbara Turner, Norma Wightman, Eunice Williamson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Latino-Americans showed improved nutrition knowledge and food-buying and preparation practices after listening to nutrition lessons on Spanish-language radio.
A series of five nutrition education lessons was broadcast over Spanish-language radio in a major metropolitan and a semirural area of southern California. Pre- and postbroadcast interviews with a random sample of enrollees were used to examine differences in nutrition-related knowledge, practices, and frequency of eating selected foods. In both broadcast locations, knowledge and practice gains were significant, but reported food-frequency patterns did not reflect change. Listeners liked the lessons and home-study guides, and identified specific ways they had applied the information. Spanish-language radio appears to be an effective medium to deliver nutrition education to Latinos.
“Resistance-breaking” nematodes identified in California tomatoes
by Isgouhi Kaloshian, Valerie M. Williamson, Gene Miyao, Dennis A. Lawn, Becky B. Westerdahl
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New strains of root-knot nematodes have been attacking tomato plants containing the Mi gene, which were once resistant to the pest.
Resistance to root-knot nematodes in tomato is conferred by the gene Mi. We have identified two field populations of Meloidogyne incognita that parasitize tomato plants containing the Mi gene. This necessitates the use of planned crop rotation practices and the incorporation of other resistance genes into cultivated tomato.
50 Years: California Agriculture
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Division changes with the needs of Californians
by W.R. Gomes
Full text HTML  | PDF  
UCB Library to preserve ag literature
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Letter
by Kimberly A. Crum, Karen Watts
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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