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California Agriculture, Vol. 4, No.6

Return-stack orchard heater proved efficient
June 1950
Volume 4, Number 6

Research articles

Sugar beet growth research: All factors affecting growth of plants now subject to individual study in controlled environment laboratory
by Albert Ulrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The investigations reported in the following article are being conducted through the cooperation of the California Institute of Technology, the Beet Sugar Development Foundation and the University of California College of Agriculture.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The investigations reported in the following article are being conducted through the cooperation of the California Institute of Technology, the Beet Sugar Development Foundation and the University of California College of Agriculture.
Giant-berry grapes: Principles of genetics employed to propagate varieties producing berries of larger size
by H. P. Olmo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two new varieties of table grapes are being propagated for large sized berries and good fruitfulness.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two new varieties of table grapes are being propagated for large sized berries and good fruitfulness.
Washington navel orange juice: Quality and mineral composition affected by chemical fertilizers, manure and covercrops
by W. Jones Winston, E. R. Parker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The composition of Washington Navel orange juice is influenced by fertilizers, as shown in field experiments with Navels on sweet orange rootstock. Effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilizers—as well as manure and winter covercrops—were studied.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The composition of Washington Navel orange juice is influenced by fertilizers, as shown in field experiments with Navels on sweet orange rootstock. Effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilizers—as well as manure and winter covercrops—were studied.
Navel orange juice bitterness: Rootstock determines amount of bitterness in juice of Washington Navel oranges investigations reveal
by George L. Marsh, S. H. Cameron
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The striking effect that rootstock exerts on bitterness in extracted navel orange juice was apparent at the first sampling period in experiments conducted during the 1947-48 and 1948-49 Washington Navel seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The striking effect that rootstock exerts on bitterness in extracted navel orange juice was apparent at the first sampling period in experiments conducted during the 1947-48 and 1948-49 Washington Navel seasons.
Return-stack orchard heater: Virtually smokeless heating service unde for 180 hours without cleaning demented Heater
by A. S. Leonard, Robert A. Kepner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Return-Stack orchard heater is the only bowl-type heater available at the present time which has been proved by field tests to provide reliable operation over long periods of time without cleaning and without objectionable amounts of smoke, even in mass heating.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Return-Stack orchard heater is the only bowl-type heater available at the present time which has been proved by field tests to provide reliable operation over long periods of time without cleaning and without objectionable amounts of smoke, even in mass heating.
Wind machines: Operating costs in field trials less than heaters but protection is limited
by B. E. Yarick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Wind machines have permanent value to citrus fruit growers because of their low cost operation and freedom from smoke. This is especially true in the colder areas.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Wind machines have permanent value to citrus fruit growers because of their low cost operation and freedom from smoke. This is especially true in the colder areas.
Freeze injuries to citrus: Tests during 1949 reveal facts important to growers of Valencia oranges and Marsh grapefruit
by E. T. Bartholomew, W. B. Sinclair, R. P. Horspool
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Valencia oranges and Marsh grapefruit showed a remarkable recovery from the effects of the freezes of the winter of 1948-49.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Valencia oranges and Marsh grapefruit showed a remarkable recovery from the effects of the freezes of the winter of 1948-49.
Insect pests of alfalfa seed: Proper timing of control measures increases yield and quality of alfalfa seed
by Ray F. Smith, L. D. Anderson, H. T. Reynolds
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Maximum alfalfa seed yields can be obtained when harmful insects are controlled and pollinating insects are abundant.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Maximum alfalfa seed yields can be obtained when harmful insects are controlled and pollinating insects are abundant.
Melon aphid control: Effectiveness of insecticides influenced by weather, predator populations, and infestations in adjacent fields
by A. E. Michelbacher, W. W. Middlekauff, Charles Hanson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The melon aphid,Aphis gossypii Glov. was extremely abundant and widespread in California during the 1949 season. In some areas very large and destructive populations were encountered, and large quantities of aphicides were used to combat the pest. The seriousness of the infestation afforded ample opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of several insecticides in controlling the pest on many varieties of melons including cantaloupe, honeydew, Persian, crenshaw, casaba and watermelon.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The melon aphid,Aphis gossypii Glov. was extremely abundant and widespread in California during the 1949 season. In some areas very large and destructive populations were encountered, and large quantities of aphicides were used to combat the pest. The seriousness of the infestation afforded ample opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of several insecticides in controlling the pest on many varieties of melons including cantaloupe, honeydew, Persian, crenshaw, casaba and watermelon.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 4, No.6

Return-stack orchard heater proved efficient
June 1950
Volume 4, Number 6

Research articles

Sugar beet growth research: All factors affecting growth of plants now subject to individual study in controlled environment laboratory
by Albert Ulrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The investigations reported in the following article are being conducted through the cooperation of the California Institute of Technology, the Beet Sugar Development Foundation and the University of California College of Agriculture.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The investigations reported in the following article are being conducted through the cooperation of the California Institute of Technology, the Beet Sugar Development Foundation and the University of California College of Agriculture.
Giant-berry grapes: Principles of genetics employed to propagate varieties producing berries of larger size
by H. P. Olmo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two new varieties of table grapes are being propagated for large sized berries and good fruitfulness.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two new varieties of table grapes are being propagated for large sized berries and good fruitfulness.
Washington navel orange juice: Quality and mineral composition affected by chemical fertilizers, manure and covercrops
by W. Jones Winston, E. R. Parker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The composition of Washington Navel orange juice is influenced by fertilizers, as shown in field experiments with Navels on sweet orange rootstock. Effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilizers—as well as manure and winter covercrops—were studied.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The composition of Washington Navel orange juice is influenced by fertilizers, as shown in field experiments with Navels on sweet orange rootstock. Effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilizers—as well as manure and winter covercrops—were studied.
Navel orange juice bitterness: Rootstock determines amount of bitterness in juice of Washington Navel oranges investigations reveal
by George L. Marsh, S. H. Cameron
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The striking effect that rootstock exerts on bitterness in extracted navel orange juice was apparent at the first sampling period in experiments conducted during the 1947-48 and 1948-49 Washington Navel seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The striking effect that rootstock exerts on bitterness in extracted navel orange juice was apparent at the first sampling period in experiments conducted during the 1947-48 and 1948-49 Washington Navel seasons.
Return-stack orchard heater: Virtually smokeless heating service unde for 180 hours without cleaning demented Heater
by A. S. Leonard, Robert A. Kepner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Return-Stack orchard heater is the only bowl-type heater available at the present time which has been proved by field tests to provide reliable operation over long periods of time without cleaning and without objectionable amounts of smoke, even in mass heating.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Return-Stack orchard heater is the only bowl-type heater available at the present time which has been proved by field tests to provide reliable operation over long periods of time without cleaning and without objectionable amounts of smoke, even in mass heating.
Wind machines: Operating costs in field trials less than heaters but protection is limited
by B. E. Yarick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Wind machines have permanent value to citrus fruit growers because of their low cost operation and freedom from smoke. This is especially true in the colder areas.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Wind machines have permanent value to citrus fruit growers because of their low cost operation and freedom from smoke. This is especially true in the colder areas.
Freeze injuries to citrus: Tests during 1949 reveal facts important to growers of Valencia oranges and Marsh grapefruit
by E. T. Bartholomew, W. B. Sinclair, R. P. Horspool
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Valencia oranges and Marsh grapefruit showed a remarkable recovery from the effects of the freezes of the winter of 1948-49.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Valencia oranges and Marsh grapefruit showed a remarkable recovery from the effects of the freezes of the winter of 1948-49.
Insect pests of alfalfa seed: Proper timing of control measures increases yield and quality of alfalfa seed
by Ray F. Smith, L. D. Anderson, H. T. Reynolds
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Maximum alfalfa seed yields can be obtained when harmful insects are controlled and pollinating insects are abundant.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Maximum alfalfa seed yields can be obtained when harmful insects are controlled and pollinating insects are abundant.
Melon aphid control: Effectiveness of insecticides influenced by weather, predator populations, and infestations in adjacent fields
by A. E. Michelbacher, W. W. Middlekauff, Charles Hanson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The melon aphid,Aphis gossypii Glov. was extremely abundant and widespread in California during the 1949 season. In some areas very large and destructive populations were encountered, and large quantities of aphicides were used to combat the pest. The seriousness of the infestation afforded ample opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of several insecticides in controlling the pest on many varieties of melons including cantaloupe, honeydew, Persian, crenshaw, casaba and watermelon.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The melon aphid,Aphis gossypii Glov. was extremely abundant and widespread in California during the 1949 season. In some areas very large and destructive populations were encountered, and large quantities of aphicides were used to combat the pest. The seriousness of the infestation afforded ample opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of several insecticides in controlling the pest on many varieties of melons including cantaloupe, honeydew, Persian, crenshaw, casaba and watermelon.

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