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California Agriculture, Vol. 4, No.4

Peach varieties developed for warm climates
April 1950
Volume 4, Number 4

Research articles

Peaches for warm climates: New varieties are solving problem of insufficient winter chilling in southern California orchards
by M. M. Winslow
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: New peach varieties requiring little winter chilling to break dormancy are solving the problem of delayed foliation in orchards in the lower elevations of southern California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: New peach varieties requiring little winter chilling to break dormancy are solving the problem of delayed foliation in orchards in the lower elevations of southern California.
Increasing olive fruit sizes: Thinning important in lifting fruit from substandard grade into canning quality
by H. T. Hartmann, Karl W. Opitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Olives of canning fruit size are of particular interest to California olive growers due to the probable 50% cut in the tariff on olive oil.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Olives of canning fruit size are of particular interest to California olive growers due to the probable 50% cut in the tariff on olive oil.
2,4-D and citrus fruit sizes: Increase of citrus fruit size primarily due to accelerated growth rate from spray treatment
by Wm. S. Stewart, H. Z. Hield
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: For the sixth successive year the grower of Valencia oranges apparently is faced with small-sized fruit in 1950— even though the size is larger than in 1949.
Not available – first paragraph follows: For the sixth successive year the grower of Valencia oranges apparently is faced with small-sized fruit in 1950— even though the size is larger than in 1949.
Male-sterile tomatoes: Unfruitful mutants offer several advantages for the production of hybrid seed
by Charles M. Rick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Male-sterile tomatoes offer advantages in the production of hybrid seed— from which substantially higher yields than those of parent varieties have been reported.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Male-sterile tomatoes offer advantages in the production of hybrid seed— from which substantially higher yields than those of parent varieties have been reported.
The redwoods of California: Conservation of Sequoias possible through seedling maintenance and proper cutting practices
by Emanuel Fritz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The redwoods of California are the only living species of Sequoia.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The redwoods of California are the only living species of Sequoia.
Oak pit scales: Control possible with emulsion-type foliage oil and toxaphene spray
by A. Earl Pritchard, Robert E. Beer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Oak pit scales are serious pests of oak trees in California. Terminal growth, branches, and smaller trees are often killed as a result of the feeding scales, and large trees may be weakened seriously. Experimental work indicates that oak pit scales may be controlled.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Oak pit scales are serious pests of oak trees in California. Terminal growth, branches, and smaller trees are often killed as a result of the feeding scales, and large trees may be weakened seriously. Experimental work indicates that oak pit scales may be controlled.
Ripe fruit rot in tomatoes: Early maturity of fruit and harvest before fall rains are factors in reducing loss
by R. G. Grogan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Fruit rot in the California canning tomato crop is an important problem because state standardization laws require that fruit having 5% or more rot at the time of inspection be rejected as unfit for processing.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Fruit rot in the California canning tomato crop is an important problem because state standardization laws require that fruit having 5% or more rot at the time of inspection be rejected as unfit for processing.
Potato scab control: Applications of sulfur to increase soil acidity effective in reducing disease in experiments in Kern County
by John W. Oswald, David N. Wright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most promising approach in the prevention of potato scab development has been to increase the acidity of the soil by the addition of sulfur.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most promising approach in the prevention of potato scab development has been to increase the acidity of the soil by the addition of sulfur.
Sweet corn: Growth and yield affected by irrigation in semiarid areas
by John H. MacGillivray
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Growth of sweet corn is greatly affected by insufficient soil moisture, as measured by yield of marketable ears, size of plant, and dry matter produced.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Growth of sweet corn is greatly affected by insufficient soil moisture, as measured by yield of marketable ears, size of plant, and dry matter produced.
Egg washing field trials: Studies indicate clean unwashed eggs are most suitable for satisfactory storage
by F. W. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Washing eggs before storage is a risky business. The only safe eggs to store are clean eggs produced clean and unwashed.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Washing eggs before storage is a risky business. The only safe eggs to store are clean eggs produced clean and unwashed.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 4, No.4

Peach varieties developed for warm climates
April 1950
Volume 4, Number 4

Research articles

Peaches for warm climates: New varieties are solving problem of insufficient winter chilling in southern California orchards
by M. M. Winslow
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: New peach varieties requiring little winter chilling to break dormancy are solving the problem of delayed foliation in orchards in the lower elevations of southern California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: New peach varieties requiring little winter chilling to break dormancy are solving the problem of delayed foliation in orchards in the lower elevations of southern California.
Increasing olive fruit sizes: Thinning important in lifting fruit from substandard grade into canning quality
by H. T. Hartmann, Karl W. Opitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Olives of canning fruit size are of particular interest to California olive growers due to the probable 50% cut in the tariff on olive oil.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Olives of canning fruit size are of particular interest to California olive growers due to the probable 50% cut in the tariff on olive oil.
2,4-D and citrus fruit sizes: Increase of citrus fruit size primarily due to accelerated growth rate from spray treatment
by Wm. S. Stewart, H. Z. Hield
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: For the sixth successive year the grower of Valencia oranges apparently is faced with small-sized fruit in 1950— even though the size is larger than in 1949.
Not available – first paragraph follows: For the sixth successive year the grower of Valencia oranges apparently is faced with small-sized fruit in 1950— even though the size is larger than in 1949.
Male-sterile tomatoes: Unfruitful mutants offer several advantages for the production of hybrid seed
by Charles M. Rick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Male-sterile tomatoes offer advantages in the production of hybrid seed— from which substantially higher yields than those of parent varieties have been reported.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Male-sterile tomatoes offer advantages in the production of hybrid seed— from which substantially higher yields than those of parent varieties have been reported.
The redwoods of California: Conservation of Sequoias possible through seedling maintenance and proper cutting practices
by Emanuel Fritz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The redwoods of California are the only living species of Sequoia.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The redwoods of California are the only living species of Sequoia.
Oak pit scales: Control possible with emulsion-type foliage oil and toxaphene spray
by A. Earl Pritchard, Robert E. Beer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Oak pit scales are serious pests of oak trees in California. Terminal growth, branches, and smaller trees are often killed as a result of the feeding scales, and large trees may be weakened seriously. Experimental work indicates that oak pit scales may be controlled.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Oak pit scales are serious pests of oak trees in California. Terminal growth, branches, and smaller trees are often killed as a result of the feeding scales, and large trees may be weakened seriously. Experimental work indicates that oak pit scales may be controlled.
Ripe fruit rot in tomatoes: Early maturity of fruit and harvest before fall rains are factors in reducing loss
by R. G. Grogan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Fruit rot in the California canning tomato crop is an important problem because state standardization laws require that fruit having 5% or more rot at the time of inspection be rejected as unfit for processing.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Fruit rot in the California canning tomato crop is an important problem because state standardization laws require that fruit having 5% or more rot at the time of inspection be rejected as unfit for processing.
Potato scab control: Applications of sulfur to increase soil acidity effective in reducing disease in experiments in Kern County
by John W. Oswald, David N. Wright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most promising approach in the prevention of potato scab development has been to increase the acidity of the soil by the addition of sulfur.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most promising approach in the prevention of potato scab development has been to increase the acidity of the soil by the addition of sulfur.
Sweet corn: Growth and yield affected by irrigation in semiarid areas
by John H. MacGillivray
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Growth of sweet corn is greatly affected by insufficient soil moisture, as measured by yield of marketable ears, size of plant, and dry matter produced.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Growth of sweet corn is greatly affected by insufficient soil moisture, as measured by yield of marketable ears, size of plant, and dry matter produced.
Egg washing field trials: Studies indicate clean unwashed eggs are most suitable for satisfactory storage
by F. W. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Washing eggs before storage is a risky business. The only safe eggs to store are clean eggs produced clean and unwashed.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Washing eggs before storage is a risky business. The only safe eggs to store are clean eggs produced clean and unwashed.

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