California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

September-October 1987
Volume 41, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Oak trees have varied effect on land values
by Nancy K. Diamond, Richard B. Standiford, Peter C. Passof, John LeBlanc
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
It's economically sound to keep at least some trees on rural subdivision land.
On rangelands suitable for future rural subdivision, leaving some oaks may increase property values. The most favorable density in this study was 40 trees per acre.
Water use in California's ornamental nurseries
by David W. Burger, Janet S. Hartin, Donald R. Hodel, Tim A. Lukaszewski, Steven A. Tjosvold, Sally A. Wagner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Container plant water use has been calculated to help nurseries improve water management.
Little is known about how much water container-grown plants require for maximum growth and value. This study answered some fundamental questions on the subject.
Tall fescue gaining popularity as a turfgrass
by M. Ali Harivandi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New cultivars could increase tall fescue's popularity in central coastal California climates.
Tall fescue's poor reputation as a lawn grass may be overcome by newly developed cultivars that produce a denser, dark green turf.
Low temperature decreases CUF 101 alfalfa resistance to blue alfalfa aphid
by Charles G. Summers, Albert S. Newton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
At 59°F, CUF 101 alfalfa lost its resistance to blue alfalfa aphid in laboratory experiments.
The loss of resistance to blue alfalfa aphid could require additional pesticide treatments in unusually CooI spring weather.
Asparagus aphid is spreading fast
by Steven J. Castle, Thomas M. Perring, Charles A. Farrar, Al N. Kishaba
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Rapid buildup and dispersal of the aphid are cause for concern by growers.
The asparagus aphid has been shown to tepre due and disperse rapidly in the warmer regions of the state. It could become a serious pest.
Berseem clover is getting a second chance
by David M. Calderon, Melvin R. George, Walter L. Graves, James L. Sullins, Victor A. Wegrzyn, William A. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Multicut berseem clover outyielded ryegrass and had a high nitrogen-fixing ability in four years of field trials.
The high yield, protein content, and nitrogen-fixing ability of new varieties make berseem an excellent candidate for forage in some areas of the state. Foundation seed will be available this fall.
A systems approach to drainage reduction
by Blaine R. Hanson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Subsurface drainage problems in farming areas historically have been dealt with by installing systems to collect and convey drainage water to a disposal site. While these systems remove drainage water as it is generated, no source reduction is considered. The saline and toxic nature of drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley, however, precludes this traditional disposal method.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Subsurface drainage problems in farming areas historically have been dealt with by installing systems to collect and convey drainage water to a disposal site. While these systems remove drainage water as it is generated, no source reduction is considered. The saline and toxic nature of drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley, however, precludes this traditional disposal method.
Saline drainage water reuse in a cotton rotation system
by D. William Rains, Sham Goyal, Reina Weyrauch, André Lauchli
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Saline drainage water had little effect on cotton yield in the first and second years of these trials.
Use of drainage water for irrigation of melons and tomatoes
by Stephen R. Grattan, Carol Shennan, Donald M. May, Jeffery P. Mitchell, Richard G. Burau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Reuse of saline dminage water to irrigate melons and tomatoes caused no loss of yield and no health hazards.
Surge vs. continuous-flow irrigation
by David A. Goldhamer, Mohammad H. Alemi, Rebecca C. Phene
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A primary goal of good irrigation management is to minimize deep percolation of water (infiltration exceeding the irrigation requirement) while replenishing soil water in the plant root zone along the entire length of the field. Deep percolation losses depend directly on irrigation system performance, which, in turn, depends mainly on how evenly water infiltrates across the field. Furrow and border irrigation, the primary methods used in the drainage problem area of the San Joaquin Valley's West Side, usually have relatively low uniformities because of (1) unequal infiltration opportunity times for water across the field, and (2) spatial variability in soil water transport properties. Properly designed and managed sprinkler and drip irrigation systems, on the other hand, commonly achieve a better uniformity, since the amounts infiltrated depend primarily on application rates and system design rather than on soil infiltration properties.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A primary goal of good irrigation management is to minimize deep percolation of water (infiltration exceeding the irrigation requirement) while replenishing soil water in the plant root zone along the entire length of the field. Deep percolation losses depend directly on irrigation system performance, which, in turn, depends mainly on how evenly water infiltrates across the field. Furrow and border irrigation, the primary methods used in the drainage problem area of the San Joaquin Valley's West Side, usually have relatively low uniformities because of (1) unequal infiltration opportunity times for water across the field, and (2) spatial variability in soil water transport properties. Properly designed and managed sprinkler and drip irrigation systems, on the other hand, commonly achieve a better uniformity, since the amounts infiltrated depend primarily on application rates and system design rather than on soil infiltration properties.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Agricultural research and environmental quality
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Irrigation drainage reduction
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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September-October 1987
Volume 41, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Oak trees have varied effect on land values
by Nancy K. Diamond, Richard B. Standiford, Peter C. Passof, John LeBlanc
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
It's economically sound to keep at least some trees on rural subdivision land.
On rangelands suitable for future rural subdivision, leaving some oaks may increase property values. The most favorable density in this study was 40 trees per acre.
Water use in California's ornamental nurseries
by David W. Burger, Janet S. Hartin, Donald R. Hodel, Tim A. Lukaszewski, Steven A. Tjosvold, Sally A. Wagner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Container plant water use has been calculated to help nurseries improve water management.
Little is known about how much water container-grown plants require for maximum growth and value. This study answered some fundamental questions on the subject.
Tall fescue gaining popularity as a turfgrass
by M. Ali Harivandi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New cultivars could increase tall fescue's popularity in central coastal California climates.
Tall fescue's poor reputation as a lawn grass may be overcome by newly developed cultivars that produce a denser, dark green turf.
Low temperature decreases CUF 101 alfalfa resistance to blue alfalfa aphid
by Charles G. Summers, Albert S. Newton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
At 59°F, CUF 101 alfalfa lost its resistance to blue alfalfa aphid in laboratory experiments.
The loss of resistance to blue alfalfa aphid could require additional pesticide treatments in unusually CooI spring weather.
Asparagus aphid is spreading fast
by Steven J. Castle, Thomas M. Perring, Charles A. Farrar, Al N. Kishaba
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Rapid buildup and dispersal of the aphid are cause for concern by growers.
The asparagus aphid has been shown to tepre due and disperse rapidly in the warmer regions of the state. It could become a serious pest.
Berseem clover is getting a second chance
by David M. Calderon, Melvin R. George, Walter L. Graves, James L. Sullins, Victor A. Wegrzyn, William A. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Multicut berseem clover outyielded ryegrass and had a high nitrogen-fixing ability in four years of field trials.
The high yield, protein content, and nitrogen-fixing ability of new varieties make berseem an excellent candidate for forage in some areas of the state. Foundation seed will be available this fall.
A systems approach to drainage reduction
by Blaine R. Hanson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Subsurface drainage problems in farming areas historically have been dealt with by installing systems to collect and convey drainage water to a disposal site. While these systems remove drainage water as it is generated, no source reduction is considered. The saline and toxic nature of drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley, however, precludes this traditional disposal method.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Subsurface drainage problems in farming areas historically have been dealt with by installing systems to collect and convey drainage water to a disposal site. While these systems remove drainage water as it is generated, no source reduction is considered. The saline and toxic nature of drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley, however, precludes this traditional disposal method.
Saline drainage water reuse in a cotton rotation system
by D. William Rains, Sham Goyal, Reina Weyrauch, André Lauchli
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Saline drainage water had little effect on cotton yield in the first and second years of these trials.
Use of drainage water for irrigation of melons and tomatoes
by Stephen R. Grattan, Carol Shennan, Donald M. May, Jeffery P. Mitchell, Richard G. Burau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Reuse of saline dminage water to irrigate melons and tomatoes caused no loss of yield and no health hazards.
Surge vs. continuous-flow irrigation
by David A. Goldhamer, Mohammad H. Alemi, Rebecca C. Phene
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A primary goal of good irrigation management is to minimize deep percolation of water (infiltration exceeding the irrigation requirement) while replenishing soil water in the plant root zone along the entire length of the field. Deep percolation losses depend directly on irrigation system performance, which, in turn, depends mainly on how evenly water infiltrates across the field. Furrow and border irrigation, the primary methods used in the drainage problem area of the San Joaquin Valley's West Side, usually have relatively low uniformities because of (1) unequal infiltration opportunity times for water across the field, and (2) spatial variability in soil water transport properties. Properly designed and managed sprinkler and drip irrigation systems, on the other hand, commonly achieve a better uniformity, since the amounts infiltrated depend primarily on application rates and system design rather than on soil infiltration properties.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A primary goal of good irrigation management is to minimize deep percolation of water (infiltration exceeding the irrigation requirement) while replenishing soil water in the plant root zone along the entire length of the field. Deep percolation losses depend directly on irrigation system performance, which, in turn, depends mainly on how evenly water infiltrates across the field. Furrow and border irrigation, the primary methods used in the drainage problem area of the San Joaquin Valley's West Side, usually have relatively low uniformities because of (1) unequal infiltration opportunity times for water across the field, and (2) spatial variability in soil water transport properties. Properly designed and managed sprinkler and drip irrigation systems, on the other hand, commonly achieve a better uniformity, since the amounts infiltrated depend primarily on application rates and system design rather than on soil infiltration properties.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Agricultural research and environmental quality
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Irrigation drainage reduction
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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