California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

November-December 1987
Volume 41, Number 11

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Income tax reform and California farmers: Who wins and who loses?
by Hoy F. Carman, Robert Innes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The answer depends on the individual case, but agriculture as a whole is expected to benefit in the long run. Vineyard developers are among those who will be affected both directly and indirectly by several provisions of the new law. (Cover photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
By placing restrictions on tax incentives, the new law may discourage tax shelter investments in agriculture. Investment decisions will be based more on economics and less on possible tax losses.
Hardseeded Spanish subclover finds a place in southern California
by Walter L. Graves, Burgess L. Kay, William H. Weitkamp, Melvin R. George
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Four strains tested showed good adaptability to highly variable, dry, southern California conditions.
The impressive showing of Spanish sub clovers may lead to wider use here for range and pasture in areas with low and variable rainfall.
The potential of gypsy moth as a pest of fruit and nut crops
by Jeffrey C. Miller, Paul E. Hanson, Robert V. Dowell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Laboratory studies showed larvae could develop on foliage of several California fruit and nut crops.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The gypsy moth is a well-known pest of deciduous forests and landscape trees in northeastern United States. Most of the studies and available information on the feeding habits of larvae are therefore based on the flora of that region. However, as the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), is introduced into new areas such as California, different plants become available as potential hosts (California Agriculture, March 1977, July 1982, and March-April 1984).
Chemical control of powdery mildew on Kentucky bluegrass
by Howard D. Ohr, Margaret K. Murphy, Emmylou M. Krausman, John Van Dam, Robert M. Endo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The disease, which may occur during cool weather, can be controlled with fungicidal drenches.
Several products effectively control this relatively minor disorder.
Biologically derived insecticides for use against beet armyworm
by William J. Moar, John T. Trumble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Microbial insecticides with novel modes of action may prove effective for use in tomato and celery IPM programs.
New microbial insecticides are good prospects for use in tomato and celery IPM programs.
The importance of soil fumigation for nematode control
by John D. Radewald, Michael V. McKenry, Philip A. Roberts, Becky B. Westerdahl
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The most effective and economical of the limited control options available is usually soil fumigation with 1,3-D.
Preplant fumigation is the only acceptable way to control nematodes in some crops. 1,3–D is one of the few products available to do the job.
California farm employment and wages in 1984
by Philip L. Martin, John Mainer, Bert Mason, Charlsey Cartwright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
State unemployment insurance reports provide useful but incomplete data.
Labor is the greatest cost input for California growers, but reliable information on the subject is scarce.
Split nitrogen applications best for cauliflower
by Norman C. Welch, Kent B. Tyler, David Ririe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Applying no more than half of the total nitrogen at seeding appears to be the most effective for growth.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cauliflower is a cool-season crop that is exacting in its climatic and cultural requirements. For highest quality curd (edible portion), this crop needs an average monthly temperature of 60 to 70F. Extreme heat, poor cultural practices, or both can interrupt growth and result in poor quality curd, rendering the product worthless to the processor and fresh vegetable market.
Pitch canker threatens California pines
by Arthur H. McCain, Carlton S. Koehler, Steven A. Tjosvold
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The disease killed hundreds of Monterey pines in Santa Cruz County in 1986. Other pine species are also susceptible.
Although it primarily affects Monterey pines, pitch canker is also a potential threat to other pines in the urban landscape as well as to commercial pine forests and recreation areas.
Mixing broccoli cuItivars reduces cabbage aphid numbers
by Miguel A. Altieri, Linda L. Schmidt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Mixing cultivars and manipulating the time of planting decreased cabbage aphid populations in test plots.
The reason isn't clear, but physical differences between cultivars may play a part.
New pecans for California
by G. Steven Sibbett, Tommy E. Thompson, Nick Troiani
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several pecan clones tested showed promising early production and nut quality under California conditions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pecan is develouine as a crou of economic importance in California. A major portion of the state's approximately 2,550 acres of pecans is planted in the southern San Joaquin Valley (Fresno, Tulare, and Kern counties), where the summer is hot and dry and the fall normally rainless, facilitating late harvest of the crop. Smaller acreages occur in adjoining counties, and additional acreage is being planted in northern California. Several pecan shelling and processing facilities now exist in California, and the industry includes an Association of Pecan Growers.

News and Opinion

Communicating biotechnology
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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November-December 1987
Volume 41, Number 11

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Income tax reform and California farmers: Who wins and who loses?
by Hoy F. Carman, Robert Innes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The answer depends on the individual case, but agriculture as a whole is expected to benefit in the long run. Vineyard developers are among those who will be affected both directly and indirectly by several provisions of the new law. (Cover photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
By placing restrictions on tax incentives, the new law may discourage tax shelter investments in agriculture. Investment decisions will be based more on economics and less on possible tax losses.
Hardseeded Spanish subclover finds a place in southern California
by Walter L. Graves, Burgess L. Kay, William H. Weitkamp, Melvin R. George
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Four strains tested showed good adaptability to highly variable, dry, southern California conditions.
The impressive showing of Spanish sub clovers may lead to wider use here for range and pasture in areas with low and variable rainfall.
The potential of gypsy moth as a pest of fruit and nut crops
by Jeffrey C. Miller, Paul E. Hanson, Robert V. Dowell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Laboratory studies showed larvae could develop on foliage of several California fruit and nut crops.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The gypsy moth is a well-known pest of deciduous forests and landscape trees in northeastern United States. Most of the studies and available information on the feeding habits of larvae are therefore based on the flora of that region. However, as the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), is introduced into new areas such as California, different plants become available as potential hosts (California Agriculture, March 1977, July 1982, and March-April 1984).
Chemical control of powdery mildew on Kentucky bluegrass
by Howard D. Ohr, Margaret K. Murphy, Emmylou M. Krausman, John Van Dam, Robert M. Endo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The disease, which may occur during cool weather, can be controlled with fungicidal drenches.
Several products effectively control this relatively minor disorder.
Biologically derived insecticides for use against beet armyworm
by William J. Moar, John T. Trumble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Microbial insecticides with novel modes of action may prove effective for use in tomato and celery IPM programs.
New microbial insecticides are good prospects for use in tomato and celery IPM programs.
The importance of soil fumigation for nematode control
by John D. Radewald, Michael V. McKenry, Philip A. Roberts, Becky B. Westerdahl
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The most effective and economical of the limited control options available is usually soil fumigation with 1,3-D.
Preplant fumigation is the only acceptable way to control nematodes in some crops. 1,3–D is one of the few products available to do the job.
California farm employment and wages in 1984
by Philip L. Martin, John Mainer, Bert Mason, Charlsey Cartwright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
State unemployment insurance reports provide useful but incomplete data.
Labor is the greatest cost input for California growers, but reliable information on the subject is scarce.
Split nitrogen applications best for cauliflower
by Norman C. Welch, Kent B. Tyler, David Ririe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Applying no more than half of the total nitrogen at seeding appears to be the most effective for growth.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cauliflower is a cool-season crop that is exacting in its climatic and cultural requirements. For highest quality curd (edible portion), this crop needs an average monthly temperature of 60 to 70F. Extreme heat, poor cultural practices, or both can interrupt growth and result in poor quality curd, rendering the product worthless to the processor and fresh vegetable market.
Pitch canker threatens California pines
by Arthur H. McCain, Carlton S. Koehler, Steven A. Tjosvold
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The disease killed hundreds of Monterey pines in Santa Cruz County in 1986. Other pine species are also susceptible.
Although it primarily affects Monterey pines, pitch canker is also a potential threat to other pines in the urban landscape as well as to commercial pine forests and recreation areas.
Mixing broccoli cuItivars reduces cabbage aphid numbers
by Miguel A. Altieri, Linda L. Schmidt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Mixing cultivars and manipulating the time of planting decreased cabbage aphid populations in test plots.
The reason isn't clear, but physical differences between cultivars may play a part.
New pecans for California
by G. Steven Sibbett, Tommy E. Thompson, Nick Troiani
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several pecan clones tested showed promising early production and nut quality under California conditions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pecan is develouine as a crou of economic importance in California. A major portion of the state's approximately 2,550 acres of pecans is planted in the southern San Joaquin Valley (Fresno, Tulare, and Kern counties), where the summer is hot and dry and the fall normally rainless, facilitating late harvest of the crop. Smaller acreages occur in adjoining counties, and additional acreage is being planted in northern California. Several pecan shelling and processing facilities now exist in California, and the industry includes an Association of Pecan Growers.

News and Opinion

Communicating biotechnology
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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