California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

July-August 1986
Volume 40, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Beetle from Australia threatens eucalyptus
by Glenn T. Scriven, Eldon L. Reeves, Robert F. Luck
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Long free of major pests, southern California eucalyptus is now being attacked by eucalyptus longhorn borer.
Spreading rapidly in southern California
Fungicidal control of tomato blackmold under rainy conditions
by Eugene M. Miyao, Dennis H. Hall, Prudence Somerville, Nancy Blaker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three fungicides were effective in preventive treatments.
Fungicides as preventive sprays significantly reduced incidence of blackmold
Determining crop yield losses from air pollutants
by Patrick M. McCool, Robert C. Musselman, Roberto R. Teso, Ronald J. Oshima
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Yield-loss data produced by tests in field chambers show effects of various ozone levels on specific crops.
Measurements in field chambers reveal losses to pollution
Farmworker unions: Status and wage impacts
by Philip L. Martin, Suzanne Vaupel, Daniel Egan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Seven unions representing 14 percent of California farmworkers have had significant but varied effects on wages.
Effects on wages have been significant but limited
Molecular studies of fruit ripening
by Roger Romani, Betty Hess
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fruit cells in liquid culture undergo some ripening changes much as whole fruit do and are easier to manipulate.
Cultured pear fruit cells growing in a liquid suspension provide a useful model
Fungicides for control of powdery mildew in cucurbit…
by Albert O. Paulus, Curtis E. Engle, Faustino Munoz, Jerry Nelson, Harold W. Otto, Aziz Baameur
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several fungicides gave good control, although Bayleton seemed less effective in 1984 and 85 than in 82 tests.
Several new materials show promise
Fungicides for control of powdery mildew in tomato
by Albert O. Paulus, Robert W. Scheuerman, Faustino Munoz, Philip Osterli, Wayne L. Schrader, Harold W. Otto
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several fungicides tested controlled the disease, but growers should also look for tolerant tomato cultivars.
Managing powdery mildew and rust on sunflower
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two fungicides controlled powdery mildew and one controlled rust in a field test on sunflower.
Turfgrass performance under reduced irrigation
by Jewell L. Meyer, Victor A. Gibeault
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Potential water savings are greater with warm- than cool-season grasses.
Verticillium wilt of pistachio
by Lee J. Ashworth, David P. Morgan, Earl Surber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Phosphorus- or potassium-deficient pistachio trees are very susceptible to low levels of Verticilliumin soil.
Proper nutrition reduces infection in low-inoculum soils and improves yields
Root-knot nematode resistance in processing tomatoes
by Philip A. Roberts, Donald May, William C. Matthews
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several tomato cultivars show good tolerance of root-knot infection and might be useful in nematode management.
Cultivars with the Mi gene for resistance showed excellent tolerance of root-knot nematode injury
Evaluation of low-flow sprinklers
by Steven E. C. Post, Donald E. Peck, Robert A. Brendler, Nicholas J. Sakovich, Lee Waddle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tests with catch cans indicated the geometric arrangement and method analysis closest to “true” uniformity.
The variegated leafhopper, an increasing pest of grapes
by William H. Settle, Lloyd T. Wilson, Donald L. Flaherty, Greg M. English-Loeb
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This leafhopper escapes control by the parasitic wasp Anagrus epos largely because of its egg-laying behavior.
More serious than the grape leafhopper

News and Opinion

Plant science research
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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July-August 1986
Volume 40, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Beetle from Australia threatens eucalyptus
by Glenn T. Scriven, Eldon L. Reeves, Robert F. Luck
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Long free of major pests, southern California eucalyptus is now being attacked by eucalyptus longhorn borer.
Spreading rapidly in southern California
Fungicidal control of tomato blackmold under rainy conditions
by Eugene M. Miyao, Dennis H. Hall, Prudence Somerville, Nancy Blaker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three fungicides were effective in preventive treatments.
Fungicides as preventive sprays significantly reduced incidence of blackmold
Determining crop yield losses from air pollutants
by Patrick M. McCool, Robert C. Musselman, Roberto R. Teso, Ronald J. Oshima
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Yield-loss data produced by tests in field chambers show effects of various ozone levels on specific crops.
Measurements in field chambers reveal losses to pollution
Farmworker unions: Status and wage impacts
by Philip L. Martin, Suzanne Vaupel, Daniel Egan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Seven unions representing 14 percent of California farmworkers have had significant but varied effects on wages.
Effects on wages have been significant but limited
Molecular studies of fruit ripening
by Roger Romani, Betty Hess
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fruit cells in liquid culture undergo some ripening changes much as whole fruit do and are easier to manipulate.
Cultured pear fruit cells growing in a liquid suspension provide a useful model
Fungicides for control of powdery mildew in cucurbit…
by Albert O. Paulus, Curtis E. Engle, Faustino Munoz, Jerry Nelson, Harold W. Otto, Aziz Baameur
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several fungicides gave good control, although Bayleton seemed less effective in 1984 and 85 than in 82 tests.
Several new materials show promise
Fungicides for control of powdery mildew in tomato
by Albert O. Paulus, Robert W. Scheuerman, Faustino Munoz, Philip Osterli, Wayne L. Schrader, Harold W. Otto
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several fungicides tested controlled the disease, but growers should also look for tolerant tomato cultivars.
Managing powdery mildew and rust on sunflower
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two fungicides controlled powdery mildew and one controlled rust in a field test on sunflower.
Turfgrass performance under reduced irrigation
by Jewell L. Meyer, Victor A. Gibeault
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Potential water savings are greater with warm- than cool-season grasses.
Verticillium wilt of pistachio
by Lee J. Ashworth, David P. Morgan, Earl Surber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Phosphorus- or potassium-deficient pistachio trees are very susceptible to low levels of Verticilliumin soil.
Proper nutrition reduces infection in low-inoculum soils and improves yields
Root-knot nematode resistance in processing tomatoes
by Philip A. Roberts, Donald May, William C. Matthews
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several tomato cultivars show good tolerance of root-knot infection and might be useful in nematode management.
Cultivars with the Mi gene for resistance showed excellent tolerance of root-knot nematode injury
Evaluation of low-flow sprinklers
by Steven E. C. Post, Donald E. Peck, Robert A. Brendler, Nicholas J. Sakovich, Lee Waddle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tests with catch cans indicated the geometric arrangement and method analysis closest to “true” uniformity.
The variegated leafhopper, an increasing pest of grapes
by William H. Settle, Lloyd T. Wilson, Donald L. Flaherty, Greg M. English-Loeb
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This leafhopper escapes control by the parasitic wasp Anagrus epos largely because of its egg-laying behavior.
More serious than the grape leafhopper

News and Opinion

Plant science research
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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