California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

May-June 1986
Volume 40, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Bird damage to pistachios
by Terrell P. Salmon, A. Charles Crabb, Rex E. Marsh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Crows are the primary culprits followed by ravens and jays
Propagating California wild grape
by James A. Robbins, David W. Burger
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Easy to start from cuttings, the vine is useful in landscape plantings
Solar heating and amendments control cabbage yellows
by José Ramirez Villapudua, Donald E. Munnecke
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the overall scheme of things in agriculture, cabbage yellows is not a particularly damaging disease. The pathogen, however — Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans, referred to as “Foe” — belongs to a group of troublesome, very damaging, and economically important fungi that cause the Fusarium wilt diseases. The main species, F. oxysporum, has varieties (called “forma species”) that lead to heavy losses in crop plants worldwide, including cotton, tomato, banana, cucurbits, crucifers, and many ornamental crops.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the overall scheme of things in agriculture, cabbage yellows is not a particularly damaging disease. The pathogen, however — Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans, referred to as “Foe” — belongs to a group of troublesome, very damaging, and economically important fungi that cause the Fusarium wilt diseases. The main species, F. oxysporum, has varieties (called “forma species”) that lead to heavy losses in crop plants worldwide, including cotton, tomato, banana, cucurbits, crucifers, and many ornamental crops.
Host range and life cycle of L. africanus
by Craig Kolodge, John D. Radewald, Fujio Shibuya
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Widespread in the Imperial Valley, this needle nematode can cause severe seedling disease at relatively low populations
Baler ammoniation of rice straw
by Don A. Toenjes, Monte Bell, Bryan Jenkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
One alternative to burning
Control of Phytophthora root rot in container-grown citrus
by Howard D. Ohr, Margaret K. Murphy, Gary Bender
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Diseased trees can be restored to health by either of two fungicides
Attitudes about pesticide safety
by Glenn R. Hawkes, Martha C. Stiles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Citizens and specialists differ in their views of risks and benefits
Comparison of fungicides for control of sweet corn rust
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Nelson, Harold W. Otto, Bernarr J. Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Common corn rust caused economic loss to sweet corn growers in San Diego County during 1978-80 and in Orange County in 1985. The disease, caused by the fungus Puccinia sorghi, is favored by cool temperatures and high relative humidity.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Common corn rust caused economic loss to sweet corn growers in San Diego County during 1978-80 and in Orange County in 1985. The disease, caused by the fungus Puccinia sorghi, is favored by cool temperatures and high relative humidity.
Evaluation of center-pivot sprinkler systems
by Blaine R. Hanson, Donald L. Lancaster
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some causes of nonuniformity are correctable
Tapping community opinions in 4-H program planning
by Marc T. Braverman, Ralph C. Gay, Jeannette L. George, Carl A. Schoner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Well aware of traditional 4-H activities, the public is less aware of other projects
Monitoring peach twig borer by standardized trapping methods
by Roger R. Youngman, Martin M. Barnes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The economic thresholds need reconsideration
Managing overwintered sugarbeets
by Robert L. Sailsbery, F. J. Hills
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Tehama County is California's northernmost area of sugarbeet production. Sugar-beets previously were planted in the early spring and harvested in the fall of the same year. In 1978, however, it was decided to overwinter the crop in this area for harvest the following spring. This decision was based on improving the efficiency of the nearby processing plant by increasing the length of its run and on the 10-mile isolation of the Tehama County beet-growing area from other beet-growing areas. This isolation was considered sufficient to prevent the transfer of aphid-borne viruses from the overwintered beets to the early-spring-planted beets to the south.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Tehama County is California's northernmost area of sugarbeet production. Sugar-beets previously were planted in the early spring and harvested in the fall of the same year. In 1978, however, it was decided to overwinter the crop in this area for harvest the following spring. This decision was based on improving the efficiency of the nearby processing plant by increasing the length of its run and on the 10-mile isolation of the Tehama County beet-growing area from other beet-growing areas. This isolation was considered sufficient to prevent the transfer of aphid-borne viruses from the overwintered beets to the early-spring-planted beets to the south.

News and opinion

Reflections and projections
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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May-June 1986
Volume 40, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Bird damage to pistachios
by Terrell P. Salmon, A. Charles Crabb, Rex E. Marsh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Crows are the primary culprits followed by ravens and jays
Propagating California wild grape
by James A. Robbins, David W. Burger
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Easy to start from cuttings, the vine is useful in landscape plantings
Solar heating and amendments control cabbage yellows
by José Ramirez Villapudua, Donald E. Munnecke
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the overall scheme of things in agriculture, cabbage yellows is not a particularly damaging disease. The pathogen, however — Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans, referred to as “Foe” — belongs to a group of troublesome, very damaging, and economically important fungi that cause the Fusarium wilt diseases. The main species, F. oxysporum, has varieties (called “forma species”) that lead to heavy losses in crop plants worldwide, including cotton, tomato, banana, cucurbits, crucifers, and many ornamental crops.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the overall scheme of things in agriculture, cabbage yellows is not a particularly damaging disease. The pathogen, however — Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans, referred to as “Foe” — belongs to a group of troublesome, very damaging, and economically important fungi that cause the Fusarium wilt diseases. The main species, F. oxysporum, has varieties (called “forma species”) that lead to heavy losses in crop plants worldwide, including cotton, tomato, banana, cucurbits, crucifers, and many ornamental crops.
Host range and life cycle of L. africanus
by Craig Kolodge, John D. Radewald, Fujio Shibuya
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Widespread in the Imperial Valley, this needle nematode can cause severe seedling disease at relatively low populations
Baler ammoniation of rice straw
by Don A. Toenjes, Monte Bell, Bryan Jenkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
One alternative to burning
Control of Phytophthora root rot in container-grown citrus
by Howard D. Ohr, Margaret K. Murphy, Gary Bender
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Diseased trees can be restored to health by either of two fungicides
Attitudes about pesticide safety
by Glenn R. Hawkes, Martha C. Stiles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Citizens and specialists differ in their views of risks and benefits
Comparison of fungicides for control of sweet corn rust
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Nelson, Harold W. Otto, Bernarr J. Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Common corn rust caused economic loss to sweet corn growers in San Diego County during 1978-80 and in Orange County in 1985. The disease, caused by the fungus Puccinia sorghi, is favored by cool temperatures and high relative humidity.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Common corn rust caused economic loss to sweet corn growers in San Diego County during 1978-80 and in Orange County in 1985. The disease, caused by the fungus Puccinia sorghi, is favored by cool temperatures and high relative humidity.
Evaluation of center-pivot sprinkler systems
by Blaine R. Hanson, Donald L. Lancaster
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some causes of nonuniformity are correctable
Tapping community opinions in 4-H program planning
by Marc T. Braverman, Ralph C. Gay, Jeannette L. George, Carl A. Schoner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Well aware of traditional 4-H activities, the public is less aware of other projects
Monitoring peach twig borer by standardized trapping methods
by Roger R. Youngman, Martin M. Barnes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The economic thresholds need reconsideration
Managing overwintered sugarbeets
by Robert L. Sailsbery, F. J. Hills
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Tehama County is California's northernmost area of sugarbeet production. Sugar-beets previously were planted in the early spring and harvested in the fall of the same year. In 1978, however, it was decided to overwinter the crop in this area for harvest the following spring. This decision was based on improving the efficiency of the nearby processing plant by increasing the length of its run and on the 10-mile isolation of the Tehama County beet-growing area from other beet-growing areas. This isolation was considered sufficient to prevent the transfer of aphid-borne viruses from the overwintered beets to the early-spring-planted beets to the south.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Tehama County is California's northernmost area of sugarbeet production. Sugar-beets previously were planted in the early spring and harvested in the fall of the same year. In 1978, however, it was decided to overwinter the crop in this area for harvest the following spring. This decision was based on improving the efficiency of the nearby processing plant by increasing the length of its run and on the 10-mile isolation of the Tehama County beet-growing area from other beet-growing areas. This isolation was considered sufficient to prevent the transfer of aphid-borne viruses from the overwintered beets to the early-spring-planted beets to the south.

News and opinion

Reflections and projections
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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