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California Agriculture, Vol. 3, No.9

Forage grass seed in crop rotation system
September 1949
Volume 3, Number 9

Research articles

Orange sizes and irrigation: Tests in Riverside County indicate irrigation practices may have influence on fruit size
by C. P. Teague
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most important single factor that an orange grower can control and utilize to improve fruit sizes is the application of irrigation water.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most important single factor that an orange grower can control and utilize to improve fruit sizes is the application of irrigation water.
Grass seed production: Potentially profitable crop suitable for place in crop rotation system
by D. C. Sumner, Milton D. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following article is an abstract from a forthcoming Agricultural Extension Circular on Grass Seed Production now in preparation by the same authors.
The following article is an abstract from a forthcoming Agricultural Extension Circular on Grass Seed Production now in preparation by the same authors.
Three-part program: Improvement of dairy herds demonstrated by owner association
by F. W. Dorman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: High production of milk and butter-fat—by itself—is an inadequate index of successful dairy herd management. It also must be economical.
Not available – first paragraph follows: High production of milk and butter-fat—by itself—is an inadequate index of successful dairy herd management. It also must be economical.
Better polled cattle: Practical plan for gradual change-over from horned to polled herd offered established breeders
by P. W. Gregory
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This is the sixth article in a series of brief progress reports on the application of the science of genetics to commercial agriculture.
This is the sixth article in a series of brief progress reports on the application of the science of genetics to commercial agriculture.
Dairy cows in hot weather: Temperatures above 80° F reflected in both lowered production and the solids-not-fat content of the milk
by W. M. Regan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The producing dairy cow seems poorly equipped to stand hot weather—especially when in full production.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The producing dairy cow seems poorly equipped to stand hot weather—especially when in full production.
Sheep production experiments: Effectiveness of hormone injections studied in breeding program for spring lamb market
by Robert F. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: To market lambs in April in California, it is desirable to breed ewes so they will lamb in November and December.
Not available – first paragraph follows: To market lambs in April in California, it is desirable to breed ewes so they will lamb in November and December.
Parathion tested on fig pests: Insecticide studied as control spray for scale and Pacific mites on figs
by E. M. Stafford, D. F. Barnes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Control of fig scale by parathion was first tested on a single tree on March 31, 1947.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Control of fig scale by parathion was first tested on a single tree on March 31, 1947.
Estrogens for fattening poultry: Treatment of chickens on increase but is not recommended for turkeys
by F. W. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The use of estrogens for fattening chickens is now an established procedure in some segments of the meat-bird industry.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The use of estrogens for fattening chickens is now an established procedure in some segments of the meat-bird industry.
Celery production expensive: Costs higher than for any other field-grown vegetable in southern California
by H. W. Schwalm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Total costs for producing, harvesting, and packing the 1948 southern California celery crop averaged $2,072.00 per acre.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Total costs for producing, harvesting, and packing the 1948 southern California celery crop averaged $2,072.00 per acre.
White potatoes: Effect of irrigation on production studied through three seasons
by John H. MacGillivray
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Potatoes—a shallow-rooted crop—give pronounced increased yields from irrigation in arid areas.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Potatoes—a shallow-rooted crop—give pronounced increased yields from irrigation in arid areas.
Sweet potatoes: Care required during storage between harvest and market
by P. A. Minges, L. L. Morris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet potato harvesting in California occurs mainly during October and early November. Much of the crop is marketed immediately resulting in relatively low prices during this period. During the winter and spring months, California becomes a deficit area and sweet potatoes are shipped in from other states. With good storage practices, sweet potatoes can be held for six months. Increased storage could permit larger California production and a more stable price structure.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet potato harvesting in California occurs mainly during October and early November. Much of the crop is marketed immediately resulting in relatively low prices during this period. During the winter and spring months, California becomes a deficit area and sweet potatoes are shipped in from other states. With good storage practices, sweet potatoes can be held for six months. Increased storage could permit larger California production and a more stable price structure.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 3, No.9

Forage grass seed in crop rotation system
September 1949
Volume 3, Number 9

Research articles

Orange sizes and irrigation: Tests in Riverside County indicate irrigation practices may have influence on fruit size
by C. P. Teague
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most important single factor that an orange grower can control and utilize to improve fruit sizes is the application of irrigation water.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most important single factor that an orange grower can control and utilize to improve fruit sizes is the application of irrigation water.
Grass seed production: Potentially profitable crop suitable for place in crop rotation system
by D. C. Sumner, Milton D. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following article is an abstract from a forthcoming Agricultural Extension Circular on Grass Seed Production now in preparation by the same authors.
The following article is an abstract from a forthcoming Agricultural Extension Circular on Grass Seed Production now in preparation by the same authors.
Three-part program: Improvement of dairy herds demonstrated by owner association
by F. W. Dorman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: High production of milk and butter-fat—by itself—is an inadequate index of successful dairy herd management. It also must be economical.
Not available – first paragraph follows: High production of milk and butter-fat—by itself—is an inadequate index of successful dairy herd management. It also must be economical.
Better polled cattle: Practical plan for gradual change-over from horned to polled herd offered established breeders
by P. W. Gregory
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This is the sixth article in a series of brief progress reports on the application of the science of genetics to commercial agriculture.
This is the sixth article in a series of brief progress reports on the application of the science of genetics to commercial agriculture.
Dairy cows in hot weather: Temperatures above 80° F reflected in both lowered production and the solids-not-fat content of the milk
by W. M. Regan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The producing dairy cow seems poorly equipped to stand hot weather—especially when in full production.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The producing dairy cow seems poorly equipped to stand hot weather—especially when in full production.
Sheep production experiments: Effectiveness of hormone injections studied in breeding program for spring lamb market
by Robert F. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: To market lambs in April in California, it is desirable to breed ewes so they will lamb in November and December.
Not available – first paragraph follows: To market lambs in April in California, it is desirable to breed ewes so they will lamb in November and December.
Parathion tested on fig pests: Insecticide studied as control spray for scale and Pacific mites on figs
by E. M. Stafford, D. F. Barnes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Control of fig scale by parathion was first tested on a single tree on March 31, 1947.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Control of fig scale by parathion was first tested on a single tree on March 31, 1947.
Estrogens for fattening poultry: Treatment of chickens on increase but is not recommended for turkeys
by F. W. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The use of estrogens for fattening chickens is now an established procedure in some segments of the meat-bird industry.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The use of estrogens for fattening chickens is now an established procedure in some segments of the meat-bird industry.
Celery production expensive: Costs higher than for any other field-grown vegetable in southern California
by H. W. Schwalm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Total costs for producing, harvesting, and packing the 1948 southern California celery crop averaged $2,072.00 per acre.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Total costs for producing, harvesting, and packing the 1948 southern California celery crop averaged $2,072.00 per acre.
White potatoes: Effect of irrigation on production studied through three seasons
by John H. MacGillivray
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Potatoes—a shallow-rooted crop—give pronounced increased yields from irrigation in arid areas.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Potatoes—a shallow-rooted crop—give pronounced increased yields from irrigation in arid areas.
Sweet potatoes: Care required during storage between harvest and market
by P. A. Minges, L. L. Morris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet potato harvesting in California occurs mainly during October and early November. Much of the crop is marketed immediately resulting in relatively low prices during this period. During the winter and spring months, California becomes a deficit area and sweet potatoes are shipped in from other states. With good storage practices, sweet potatoes can be held for six months. Increased storage could permit larger California production and a more stable price structure.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet potato harvesting in California occurs mainly during October and early November. Much of the crop is marketed immediately resulting in relatively low prices during this period. During the winter and spring months, California becomes a deficit area and sweet potatoes are shipped in from other states. With good storage practices, sweet potatoes can be held for six months. Increased storage could permit larger California production and a more stable price structure.

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