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California Agriculture, Vol. 3, No.11

Testing insecticidal resistant houseflies
November 1949
Volume 3, Number 11

Research articles

Insecticide resistant houseflies: Development of resistance to organic insecticides other than DDT by houseflies in southern California
by Ralph B. March, Robert L. Metcalf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Houseflies which have developed resistance to DDT residual sprays have also become resistant to other organic insecticides.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Houseflies which have developed resistance to DDT residual sprays have also become resistant to other organic insecticides.
Deer and antelope meat studies: Season of highest palatability and food value subject of investigation of California antelope and deer
by Bessie B. Cook, Agnes Fay Morgan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Bucks of the California mule deer and the black-tailed deer usually are in prime condition—with the antlers hard—in August and early September. On the basis of palatability and vitamin content the meat of the mule deer from Santa Barbara and Ventura counties was found to be desirable from June through August and the meat of the black-tailed deer from Marin County was most palatable from the middle of March through July. The vitamin content of black-tailed deer meat seemed to be highest in the winter months.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Bucks of the California mule deer and the black-tailed deer usually are in prime condition—with the antlers hard—in August and early September. On the basis of palatability and vitamin content the meat of the mule deer from Santa Barbara and Ventura counties was found to be desirable from June through August and the meat of the black-tailed deer from Marin County was most palatable from the middle of March through July. The vitamin content of black-tailed deer meat seemed to be highest in the winter months.
Hot weather effects on swine: Controlled air temperatures and relative humidity aid in study of weight gains and well being of hogs
by Hubert Heitman, E. H. Hughes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Environmental temperatures of approximately 75° F for hogs weighing 70 to 144 pounds and 60° F for hogs between 166 and 260 pounds were the temperatures under which experimental swine at Davis made the largest daily gain and required the least amount of feed to produce 100 pounds of gain when the temperature was kept constant.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Environmental temperatures of approximately 75° F for hogs weighing 70 to 144 pounds and 60° F for hogs between 166 and 260 pounds were the temperatures under which experimental swine at Davis made the largest daily gain and required the least amount of feed to produce 100 pounds of gain when the temperature was kept constant.
Sexing of poultry: Accurate identification at hatching possible by visible effects of heritable characters
by Lewis W. Taylor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This is the eighth article in a series of brief progress reports on the application of the science of genetics to commercial agriculture.
This is the eighth article in a series of brief progress reports on the application of the science of genetics to commercial agriculture.
Figs for dairy cows: Substandard figs in feed give orchard by-product new value
by Wm. H. Alison
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: By-products of one branch of agriculture can be utilized to great advantage by another group of farmers.
Not available – first paragraph follows: By-products of one branch of agriculture can be utilized to great advantage by another group of farmers.
Olive irrigation experiments: Indicate trees respond to readily available moisture with larger and heavier fruit
by A. H. Hendrickson, F. J. Veihmeyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Olive trees should be irrigated earlier in the spring and—in addition to the summer irrigations—later in the fall than is necessary with deciduous fruits.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Olive trees should be irrigated earlier in the spring and—in addition to the summer irrigations—later in the fall than is necessary with deciduous fruits.
Temperature and bud rest period: Effect of temperature and exposure on the rest period of deciduous plant leaf buds investigated
by J. P. Bennett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Breaking the rest period of leaf buds of deciduous plants is generally admitted to be brought about mainly by the low temperatures of late fall, winter and early spring.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Breaking the rest period of leaf buds of deciduous plants is generally admitted to be brought about mainly by the low temperatures of late fall, winter and early spring.
Citrus leaf analysis: Nutrient deficiencies, excesses and fertilizer requirements of soil indicated by diagnostic aid
by H. D. Chapman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Analysis of citrus leaves as an aid in the diagnosis of the nutritional status of orchard trees—with particular attention given to the potassium state of orange trees—has been under study for a number of years at the Riverside Experiment Station.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Analysis of citrus leaves as an aid in the diagnosis of the nutritional status of orchard trees—with particular attention given to the potassium state of orange trees—has been under study for a number of years at the Riverside Experiment Station.
Orange tortrix on apples: Effective control obtained by spray treatment in fall and spring tests on experimental plot
by Arthur D. Borden, Harold F. Madsen, Stanley Benedict
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The orangetortrix—Argyrotaenia citrana—has been a major insect problem in the apple orchards of California's coastal counties for the past two or three seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The orangetortrix—Argyrotaenia citrana—has been a major insect problem in the apple orchards of California's coastal counties for the past two or three seasons.
Phomopsis canker of fig: Fig tree canker caused by wound parasite can be controlled by proper treatment
by H. N. Hansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Control of fig canker can be effected by new pruning and cutting methods.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Control of fig canker can be effected by new pruning and cutting methods.
Cucumber seed: Effect of the number of fruit per plant on yield and quality
by Melvin P. Zobel, Glen N. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two varieties of cucumbers—Chicago Pickling and Cubit—were selected to test to what extent limiting the number of fruits which mature per plant would affect the yield and quality of the seed produced.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two varieties of cucumbers—Chicago Pickling and Cubit—were selected to test to what extent limiting the number of fruits which mature per plant would affect the yield and quality of the seed produced.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 3, No.11

Testing insecticidal resistant houseflies
November 1949
Volume 3, Number 11

Research articles

Insecticide resistant houseflies: Development of resistance to organic insecticides other than DDT by houseflies in southern California
by Ralph B. March, Robert L. Metcalf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Houseflies which have developed resistance to DDT residual sprays have also become resistant to other organic insecticides.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Houseflies which have developed resistance to DDT residual sprays have also become resistant to other organic insecticides.
Deer and antelope meat studies: Season of highest palatability and food value subject of investigation of California antelope and deer
by Bessie B. Cook, Agnes Fay Morgan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Bucks of the California mule deer and the black-tailed deer usually are in prime condition—with the antlers hard—in August and early September. On the basis of palatability and vitamin content the meat of the mule deer from Santa Barbara and Ventura counties was found to be desirable from June through August and the meat of the black-tailed deer from Marin County was most palatable from the middle of March through July. The vitamin content of black-tailed deer meat seemed to be highest in the winter months.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Bucks of the California mule deer and the black-tailed deer usually are in prime condition—with the antlers hard—in August and early September. On the basis of palatability and vitamin content the meat of the mule deer from Santa Barbara and Ventura counties was found to be desirable from June through August and the meat of the black-tailed deer from Marin County was most palatable from the middle of March through July. The vitamin content of black-tailed deer meat seemed to be highest in the winter months.
Hot weather effects on swine: Controlled air temperatures and relative humidity aid in study of weight gains and well being of hogs
by Hubert Heitman, E. H. Hughes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Environmental temperatures of approximately 75° F for hogs weighing 70 to 144 pounds and 60° F for hogs between 166 and 260 pounds were the temperatures under which experimental swine at Davis made the largest daily gain and required the least amount of feed to produce 100 pounds of gain when the temperature was kept constant.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Environmental temperatures of approximately 75° F for hogs weighing 70 to 144 pounds and 60° F for hogs between 166 and 260 pounds were the temperatures under which experimental swine at Davis made the largest daily gain and required the least amount of feed to produce 100 pounds of gain when the temperature was kept constant.
Sexing of poultry: Accurate identification at hatching possible by visible effects of heritable characters
by Lewis W. Taylor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This is the eighth article in a series of brief progress reports on the application of the science of genetics to commercial agriculture.
This is the eighth article in a series of brief progress reports on the application of the science of genetics to commercial agriculture.
Figs for dairy cows: Substandard figs in feed give orchard by-product new value
by Wm. H. Alison
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: By-products of one branch of agriculture can be utilized to great advantage by another group of farmers.
Not available – first paragraph follows: By-products of one branch of agriculture can be utilized to great advantage by another group of farmers.
Olive irrigation experiments: Indicate trees respond to readily available moisture with larger and heavier fruit
by A. H. Hendrickson, F. J. Veihmeyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Olive trees should be irrigated earlier in the spring and—in addition to the summer irrigations—later in the fall than is necessary with deciduous fruits.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Olive trees should be irrigated earlier in the spring and—in addition to the summer irrigations—later in the fall than is necessary with deciduous fruits.
Temperature and bud rest period: Effect of temperature and exposure on the rest period of deciduous plant leaf buds investigated
by J. P. Bennett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Breaking the rest period of leaf buds of deciduous plants is generally admitted to be brought about mainly by the low temperatures of late fall, winter and early spring.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Breaking the rest period of leaf buds of deciduous plants is generally admitted to be brought about mainly by the low temperatures of late fall, winter and early spring.
Citrus leaf analysis: Nutrient deficiencies, excesses and fertilizer requirements of soil indicated by diagnostic aid
by H. D. Chapman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Analysis of citrus leaves as an aid in the diagnosis of the nutritional status of orchard trees—with particular attention given to the potassium state of orange trees—has been under study for a number of years at the Riverside Experiment Station.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Analysis of citrus leaves as an aid in the diagnosis of the nutritional status of orchard trees—with particular attention given to the potassium state of orange trees—has been under study for a number of years at the Riverside Experiment Station.
Orange tortrix on apples: Effective control obtained by spray treatment in fall and spring tests on experimental plot
by Arthur D. Borden, Harold F. Madsen, Stanley Benedict
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The orangetortrix—Argyrotaenia citrana—has been a major insect problem in the apple orchards of California's coastal counties for the past two or three seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The orangetortrix—Argyrotaenia citrana—has been a major insect problem in the apple orchards of California's coastal counties for the past two or three seasons.
Phomopsis canker of fig: Fig tree canker caused by wound parasite can be controlled by proper treatment
by H. N. Hansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Control of fig canker can be effected by new pruning and cutting methods.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Control of fig canker can be effected by new pruning and cutting methods.
Cucumber seed: Effect of the number of fruit per plant on yield and quality
by Melvin P. Zobel, Glen N. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two varieties of cucumbers—Chicago Pickling and Cubit—were selected to test to what extent limiting the number of fruits which mature per plant would affect the yield and quality of the seed produced.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two varieties of cucumbers—Chicago Pickling and Cubit—were selected to test to what extent limiting the number of fruits which mature per plant would affect the yield and quality of the seed produced.

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