California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

Archive

JULY-AUGUST 1985
Volume 39, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Biological control of fiddleneck
by Dan James Pantone, Stephen M. Brown, Christopher Womersley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A nematode, a midge, and at least four fungi attack fiddleneck, a weed toxic to livestock.
Beneficials and insecticides in citrus thrips management
by Tom S. Bellows, Joseph G. Morse, Demetrious G. Hadjidemetriou, Yutaka Iwata, Carol Richardson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Varying residual effects of citrus thrips pesticides could be important in management programs using biological controls.
Planning ahead for leafminer control
by John T. Trumble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A combination of parasites and compatible insecticide applications can keep leafminers in check and delay the development of resistance.
Fuchsia gall mite management
by Carlton S. Koehler, William W. Allen, Laurence R. Costello
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fuchsias highly susceptible to the mite require both pruning and spraying, but growing mite-resistant fuchsias is an alternative.
Response to incentive pay among vineyard workers
by Gregory Encina Billikopf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vineyard workers consistently differed in pruning speed but didn't always respond to incentive pay.
Fungicides for control of powdery mildew of melons
by Albert O. Paulus, Faustino Munoz, Jerry Nelson, Wayne L. Schrader, Harold W. Otto
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two registered fungicides effectively controlled powdery mildew in cantaloupe and Crenshaw melons.
Environmental chemistry of selenium
by Richard G. Burau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The shallow ponds that make up the 1,200-acre Kesterson Reservoir near Los Banos, focal point of a critical water issue in California, are visible in the upper center of this aerial shot by Max Clover. At right is the San Luis Drain, which feeds Kesterson with brackish selenium-bearing wastewater from the San Joaquin Valley Westlands Irrigation District 80 miles to the south.
The drainage of agricultural wastewater from the rich San Joaquin Valley — a problem that has vexed farmers, scientists, and politicians for many years — reached a climax early this year, when a halt was ordered in the delivery of federal irrigation water to 42,000 acres of land in the Westlands area of the Valley. Behind this action was the detection of high levels of selenium in Kesterson Reservoir, terminus for the 80-mile-long San Luis Drain, which carries saline wastewater from the Westlands Irrigation District to Kesterson. Built in 1971, the 12 shallow evaporation ponds at Kesteron supported a variety of fish and wildlife. Mortalities and deformities attributed to accumulated selenium attracted national attention. In this article, Dr. Richard Burau, Professor of Soil Chemistry in the Department of Land, Air, and Water at UC Davis, reviews what is known about selenium and how it enters the food chain.
Seed extract shows promise in leafminer control
by Ursula Stein, Michael P. Parrella
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Neem, a natural insecticide from a tropical tree, may help control the leafminers in chrysanthemums.
Polyester covers protect vegetables from whiteflies and virus disease
by Eric T. Natwick, Alfonso Durazo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Spun-bonded polyester row covers kept whitefly from squash plants, protecting them from viruses.
The boll weevil may be spreading
by C. A. Beasley, T. J. Henneberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Potential spread of the weevil in lower desert areas may require stricter control measures.
Canola meal can replace cottonseed meal in dairy diets
by Edward J. DePeters, Donald L. Bath
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
High-producing cows in early lactation performed equally well with canola meal or cottonseed meal as the protein supplement.
Viruses cause heavy melon losses in desert valleys
by Stephen T. Nameth, Franklin F. Laemmlen, J. Allan Dodds
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three mosaic viruses decreased 1984 spring melon yields 40 to 50 percent in southern California.
Cabbage yield and nutrient uptake
by Norman C. Welch, Kent B. Tyler, David Ririe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Splitting nitrogen applications or adding a denitrification inhibitor improved cabbage yields.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Regenerative agriculture must be profitable
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Publications of interest
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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JULY-AUGUST 1985
Volume 39, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Biological control of fiddleneck
by Dan James Pantone, Stephen M. Brown, Christopher Womersley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A nematode, a midge, and at least four fungi attack fiddleneck, a weed toxic to livestock.
Beneficials and insecticides in citrus thrips management
by Tom S. Bellows, Joseph G. Morse, Demetrious G. Hadjidemetriou, Yutaka Iwata, Carol Richardson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Varying residual effects of citrus thrips pesticides could be important in management programs using biological controls.
Planning ahead for leafminer control
by John T. Trumble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A combination of parasites and compatible insecticide applications can keep leafminers in check and delay the development of resistance.
Fuchsia gall mite management
by Carlton S. Koehler, William W. Allen, Laurence R. Costello
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fuchsias highly susceptible to the mite require both pruning and spraying, but growing mite-resistant fuchsias is an alternative.
Response to incentive pay among vineyard workers
by Gregory Encina Billikopf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vineyard workers consistently differed in pruning speed but didn't always respond to incentive pay.
Fungicides for control of powdery mildew of melons
by Albert O. Paulus, Faustino Munoz, Jerry Nelson, Wayne L. Schrader, Harold W. Otto
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two registered fungicides effectively controlled powdery mildew in cantaloupe and Crenshaw melons.
Environmental chemistry of selenium
by Richard G. Burau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The shallow ponds that make up the 1,200-acre Kesterson Reservoir near Los Banos, focal point of a critical water issue in California, are visible in the upper center of this aerial shot by Max Clover. At right is the San Luis Drain, which feeds Kesterson with brackish selenium-bearing wastewater from the San Joaquin Valley Westlands Irrigation District 80 miles to the south.
The drainage of agricultural wastewater from the rich San Joaquin Valley — a problem that has vexed farmers, scientists, and politicians for many years — reached a climax early this year, when a halt was ordered in the delivery of federal irrigation water to 42,000 acres of land in the Westlands area of the Valley. Behind this action was the detection of high levels of selenium in Kesterson Reservoir, terminus for the 80-mile-long San Luis Drain, which carries saline wastewater from the Westlands Irrigation District to Kesterson. Built in 1971, the 12 shallow evaporation ponds at Kesteron supported a variety of fish and wildlife. Mortalities and deformities attributed to accumulated selenium attracted national attention. In this article, Dr. Richard Burau, Professor of Soil Chemistry in the Department of Land, Air, and Water at UC Davis, reviews what is known about selenium and how it enters the food chain.
Seed extract shows promise in leafminer control
by Ursula Stein, Michael P. Parrella
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Neem, a natural insecticide from a tropical tree, may help control the leafminers in chrysanthemums.
Polyester covers protect vegetables from whiteflies and virus disease
by Eric T. Natwick, Alfonso Durazo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Spun-bonded polyester row covers kept whitefly from squash plants, protecting them from viruses.
The boll weevil may be spreading
by C. A. Beasley, T. J. Henneberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Potential spread of the weevil in lower desert areas may require stricter control measures.
Canola meal can replace cottonseed meal in dairy diets
by Edward J. DePeters, Donald L. Bath
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
High-producing cows in early lactation performed equally well with canola meal or cottonseed meal as the protein supplement.
Viruses cause heavy melon losses in desert valleys
by Stephen T. Nameth, Franklin F. Laemmlen, J. Allan Dodds
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three mosaic viruses decreased 1984 spring melon yields 40 to 50 percent in southern California.
Cabbage yield and nutrient uptake
by Norman C. Welch, Kent B. Tyler, David Ririe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Splitting nitrogen applications or adding a denitrification inhibitor improved cabbage yields.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Regenerative agriculture must be profitable
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Publications of interest
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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