California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

MAY-JUNE 1985
Volume 39, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Verdelli summer lemons: A new option for California growers
by Joseph Maranto, Kater D. Hake
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Normally lemons ripen and are ready for market in winter, when demand is lowest and competition is greatest. Using the Verdelli process, growers can stress their trees and produce a second crop in the summer, when demand is a t its peak. (Max Clover took the cover photo in a citrus grove near Bakersfield.)
Alternative greenhouse heating systems
by Bryan M. Jenkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biomass and cogeneration systems offer substantial potential for reducing heating costs.
Computer simulation of CRS populations
by Joseph G. Morse, Michael J. Arbaugh, Daniel S. Moreno
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A computer model of CRS development will help in population forecasting.
California red scale is one of the three major arthropodpests of citrus in California, causing an annual economic crop loss of approximately $1 5 million. CRS infestations can lower the market grade of fruit as well as cause reduced tree vigor and twig and branch dieback. Management of California red scale. Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell), in the southern part of the state relies heavily on biological control with several beneficial insect parasites. Red scale is still under eradication in most southern California desert production areas. In San Joaquin Valley citrus growing areas, parasites are much less effective than in southern California and chemical control is the standard management practice. A major concern in the Valley is the potential development of pesticide resistance in California red scale, such as has been observed in Israel and South Africa. Recent research has been aimed at developing new control strategies for CRS, and at evaluating pheromone monitoring devices as a way to improve control timing and reduce the use of pesticides. The following articles report on some aspects of research funded by the Citrus Research Board, the US. Department of Agriculture, and the University of California Integra ted Pest Management Project.
Predicting CRS infestations by trapping males
by Daniel S. Moreno, Charles E. Kennett, Harold S. Forster, Richard W. Hoffmann, Donald L. Flaherty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The second male flight (June-July) was the best predictor of year-end fruit infestation.
Nitrogen uptake by cauliflower
by Norman C. Welch, Kent B. Tyler, David Ririe, Francis E. Broadbent
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A denitrification inhibitor improves nitrogen uptake and crop yield.
Thermochemical properties of biomass fuels
by Bryan M. Jenkins, James M. Ebeling
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sixty-two biomass fuels were analyzed for heat value and chemical composition.
A profile of California farmworkers
by Philip Martin, Richard Mines, Angela Diaz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Most workers surveyed were settled Mexican immigrants receiving high hourly but low annual wages.
Rice bran in swine rations
by Chris Calvert, Kent Parker, Jacquelyn Parker, Robert N. Sayre, Robin M. Saunders
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Bran is high in protein and carbohydrates, but too much in swine diets can have negative results.
Women on commercial farms
by Orville E. Thompson, Douglas Gwynn, Charlotte Sharp
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Yolo County farm women surveyed played an active role in farming, and most enjoyed the life.
Whole cottonseed increases milk fat, decreases milk protein
by Edward DePeters, Scott Taylor, Arthur Aguirre
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In diets of milking cows, whole cottonseed produced more fat and solids but less total protein.

News and opinion

Who's responsible for environmental research?
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Publications of interest
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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MAY-JUNE 1985
Volume 39, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Verdelli summer lemons: A new option for California growers
by Joseph Maranto, Kater D. Hake
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Normally lemons ripen and are ready for market in winter, when demand is lowest and competition is greatest. Using the Verdelli process, growers can stress their trees and produce a second crop in the summer, when demand is a t its peak. (Max Clover took the cover photo in a citrus grove near Bakersfield.)
Alternative greenhouse heating systems
by Bryan M. Jenkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biomass and cogeneration systems offer substantial potential for reducing heating costs.
Computer simulation of CRS populations
by Joseph G. Morse, Michael J. Arbaugh, Daniel S. Moreno
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A computer model of CRS development will help in population forecasting.
California red scale is one of the three major arthropodpests of citrus in California, causing an annual economic crop loss of approximately $1 5 million. CRS infestations can lower the market grade of fruit as well as cause reduced tree vigor and twig and branch dieback. Management of California red scale. Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell), in the southern part of the state relies heavily on biological control with several beneficial insect parasites. Red scale is still under eradication in most southern California desert production areas. In San Joaquin Valley citrus growing areas, parasites are much less effective than in southern California and chemical control is the standard management practice. A major concern in the Valley is the potential development of pesticide resistance in California red scale, such as has been observed in Israel and South Africa. Recent research has been aimed at developing new control strategies for CRS, and at evaluating pheromone monitoring devices as a way to improve control timing and reduce the use of pesticides. The following articles report on some aspects of research funded by the Citrus Research Board, the US. Department of Agriculture, and the University of California Integra ted Pest Management Project.
Predicting CRS infestations by trapping males
by Daniel S. Moreno, Charles E. Kennett, Harold S. Forster, Richard W. Hoffmann, Donald L. Flaherty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The second male flight (June-July) was the best predictor of year-end fruit infestation.
Nitrogen uptake by cauliflower
by Norman C. Welch, Kent B. Tyler, David Ririe, Francis E. Broadbent
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A denitrification inhibitor improves nitrogen uptake and crop yield.
Thermochemical properties of biomass fuels
by Bryan M. Jenkins, James M. Ebeling
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sixty-two biomass fuels were analyzed for heat value and chemical composition.
A profile of California farmworkers
by Philip Martin, Richard Mines, Angela Diaz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Most workers surveyed were settled Mexican immigrants receiving high hourly but low annual wages.
Rice bran in swine rations
by Chris Calvert, Kent Parker, Jacquelyn Parker, Robert N. Sayre, Robin M. Saunders
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Bran is high in protein and carbohydrates, but too much in swine diets can have negative results.
Women on commercial farms
by Orville E. Thompson, Douglas Gwynn, Charlotte Sharp
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Yolo County farm women surveyed played an active role in farming, and most enjoyed the life.
Whole cottonseed increases milk fat, decreases milk protein
by Edward DePeters, Scott Taylor, Arthur Aguirre
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In diets of milking cows, whole cottonseed produced more fat and solids but less total protein.

News and opinion

Who's responsible for environmental research?
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Publications of interest
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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