California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

MARCH-APRIL 1985
Volume 39, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Understanding coyote behavior
by Walter E. Howard, Roy Teranishi, Rex E. Marsh, Jerry H. Scrivner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The coyote, Canis latrans, originally found only in the western United States, has followed man and his live-stock south to Costa Rica, east to the Atlantic, and north into Alaska. It is the principal predator of sheep in California. (Cover photo by Barbara Butler)
Newsletters effective in training 4-H leaders
by Norma Wightman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In a 4-H pilot study, in-service training by newsletter increased nutrition knowledge and teaching.
Citrus flower model may aid in timing pest controls
by Thomas S. Bellows, Joseph G. Morse, Neil V. O'Connell, Donald L. Flaherty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A computer predictive model of flower development might harmonize the needs of beekeepers and citrus pest control managers.
Charcoal root rot limits potential of chickpea in the Central Valley
by Andrew C. Magyarosy, Richard M. Hoover, Joseph G. Hancock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Since high soil temperatures favor the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, caution is recommended before planting chickpeas in the Central Valley.
Controlling tadpole shrimp
by Albert A. Grigarick, Joseph H. Lynch, Michael O. Way
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Efforts to rid California rice fields of this pest have resulted in classic problems.
Almond hulls produce unexpected results in hog trials
by Chris Calvert, Kent Parker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
At levels of up to 15 percent of the diet, hulls provided enough energy to maintain maximum growth.
Managing powdery mildew on begonia
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three fungicides tested controlled powdery mildew on begonia plants for extended periods.
Pruning time affects development of Chenin blanc vines
by Amand N. Kasimatis, Edward P. Vilas
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Pruning late (March) instead of early (December) delayed shoot and grape development, but it might still be preferable if it reduced Eutypa dieback.
Sodium bicarbonate in dairy rations
by Edward J. DePeters, Alan H. Fredeen, Donald L. Bath
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When dairy cow rations include alfalfa hay, there's little need to add sodium bicarbonate.
Air pollution causes moderate damage to tomatoes
by Patrick J. Temple, Kris A. Surano, Randall G. Mutters, Gail E. Bingham, Joseph H. Shinn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In California's Central Valley, where most processing tomatoes are grown, ozone caused slight damage in one year, none in the next.
The economic effects of air pollution on annual crops
by Richard E. Howitt, Thomas W. Gossard, Richard M. Adams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Growers bear the brunt, but consumers are also affected through changes in prices.

News and opinion

Agricultural policy center — friend or foe?
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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MARCH-APRIL 1985
Volume 39, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Understanding coyote behavior
by Walter E. Howard, Roy Teranishi, Rex E. Marsh, Jerry H. Scrivner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The coyote, Canis latrans, originally found only in the western United States, has followed man and his live-stock south to Costa Rica, east to the Atlantic, and north into Alaska. It is the principal predator of sheep in California. (Cover photo by Barbara Butler)
Newsletters effective in training 4-H leaders
by Norma Wightman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In a 4-H pilot study, in-service training by newsletter increased nutrition knowledge and teaching.
Citrus flower model may aid in timing pest controls
by Thomas S. Bellows, Joseph G. Morse, Neil V. O'Connell, Donald L. Flaherty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A computer predictive model of flower development might harmonize the needs of beekeepers and citrus pest control managers.
Charcoal root rot limits potential of chickpea in the Central Valley
by Andrew C. Magyarosy, Richard M. Hoover, Joseph G. Hancock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Since high soil temperatures favor the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, caution is recommended before planting chickpeas in the Central Valley.
Controlling tadpole shrimp
by Albert A. Grigarick, Joseph H. Lynch, Michael O. Way
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Efforts to rid California rice fields of this pest have resulted in classic problems.
Almond hulls produce unexpected results in hog trials
by Chris Calvert, Kent Parker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
At levels of up to 15 percent of the diet, hulls provided enough energy to maintain maximum growth.
Managing powdery mildew on begonia
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three fungicides tested controlled powdery mildew on begonia plants for extended periods.
Pruning time affects development of Chenin blanc vines
by Amand N. Kasimatis, Edward P. Vilas
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Pruning late (March) instead of early (December) delayed shoot and grape development, but it might still be preferable if it reduced Eutypa dieback.
Sodium bicarbonate in dairy rations
by Edward J. DePeters, Alan H. Fredeen, Donald L. Bath
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When dairy cow rations include alfalfa hay, there's little need to add sodium bicarbonate.
Air pollution causes moderate damage to tomatoes
by Patrick J. Temple, Kris A. Surano, Randall G. Mutters, Gail E. Bingham, Joseph H. Shinn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In California's Central Valley, where most processing tomatoes are grown, ozone caused slight damage in one year, none in the next.
The economic effects of air pollution on annual crops
by Richard E. Howitt, Thomas W. Gossard, Richard M. Adams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Growers bear the brunt, but consumers are also affected through changes in prices.

News and opinion

Agricultural policy center — friend or foe?
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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