California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

Archive

July-August 1984
Volume 38, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Economic implications of drip irrigation
by Margriet Caswell, David Zilberman, George E. Goldman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The profit potential is greatest on lower quality land
Agricultural land use policy: Implications for state and local government
by Philip Gardner, William W. Wood
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Protecting productive farmland depends on state government policies; local governments can protect amenity value
Apple maggot: A threat to California's apple industry
by Johannes L. Joos, William W. Allen, Robert A. Van Steenwyk
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Containment appears feasible, but chances for eradication are uncertain
The cause and control of prune brownline disease
by Jeff W. Hoy, John S. M. Mircetich, Richard S. Bethell, James E. DeTar, David M. Holmberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Prune brownline, a recently-recognized disease of prune trees, is widespread in northern California, causing considerable losses in Solano, Yolo, and El Dorado counties. The disease has also been found in Sutter, Tehama, Yuba, and Placer County orchards, but the extent of its occurrence in other California prune-growing areas has not been determined.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Prune brownline, a recently-recognized disease of prune trees, is widespread in northern California, causing considerable losses in Solano, Yolo, and El Dorado counties. The disease has also been found in Sutter, Tehama, Yuba, and Placer County orchards, but the extent of its occurrence in other California prune-growing areas has not been determined.
Responses of pomegranates to ethylene treatment and storage temperature
by Adel A. Kader, Alexander Chordas, Salaheddin Elyatem
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fully ripe fruit can be safely stored for long periods if not over-chilled
Deep cultivation and gypsum as potential solutions to slow water penetration
by Michael J. Singer, John R. Munn, William E. Wildman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 2.5 million acres of California farmland have some form of water penetration problem during the irrigation season, according to a recent survey by Cooperative Extension farm advisors. In some cases, simply increasing the length or frequency of irrigation may alleviate the problem and provide sufficient water to the crop. In other cases, the problem is more serious: crop yields are reduced and health and vigor of trees and vines are adversely affected, even with careful water management.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 2.5 million acres of California farmland have some form of water penetration problem during the irrigation season, according to a recent survey by Cooperative Extension farm advisors. In some cases, simply increasing the length or frequency of irrigation may alleviate the problem and provide sufficient water to the crop. In other cases, the problem is more serious: crop yields are reduced and health and vigor of trees and vines are adversely affected, even with careful water management.
Managing spider mites in almonds with pesticide-resistant predators
by Marjorie A. Hoy, William W. Barnett, Lonnie C. Hendricks, Darryl Castro, Daniel Cahn, Walter J. Bentley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the past three years, we have investigated the use of pesticide-resistant strains of spider mite predator released into almond orchards as components of an integrated management program. This predatory mite, Metaseiulus occidentalis (Nesbitt) provides effective biological control of the Pacific and two-spotted spider mites, Tetranychus pacificus McGregor and T. urticae Koch, respectively, as well as the European red mite, Panonychus ulmi (Koch).
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the past three years, we have investigated the use of pesticide-resistant strains of spider mite predator released into almond orchards as components of an integrated management program. This predatory mite, Metaseiulus occidentalis (Nesbitt) provides effective biological control of the Pacific and two-spotted spider mites, Tetranychus pacificus McGregor and T. urticae Koch, respectively, as well as the European red mite, Panonychus ulmi (Koch).
Purple spot and Stemphylium leaf spot of asparagus
by Peter G. Falloon, Linda M. Falloon, Raymond G. Grogan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: For several years, California asparagus growers have noticed purple spots that develop near the base of the spears before harvest. The condition is worse following cool, wet weather and was more severe during 1982 and 1983 than in previous years, resulting in higher rejection rates during cutting and packing.
Not available – first paragraph follows: For several years, California asparagus growers have noticed purple spots that develop near the base of the spears before harvest. The condition is worse following cool, wet weather and was more severe during 1982 and 1983 than in previous years, resulting in higher rejection rates during cutting and packing.
Combining gossyplure and insecticides in pink bollworm control
by C. A. Beasley, T. J. Henneberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Benefits have to be weighed against possible adverse effects on beneficial predators

News and Opinion

International trade research
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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July-August 1984
Volume 38, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Economic implications of drip irrigation
by Margriet Caswell, David Zilberman, George E. Goldman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The profit potential is greatest on lower quality land
Agricultural land use policy: Implications for state and local government
by Philip Gardner, William W. Wood
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Protecting productive farmland depends on state government policies; local governments can protect amenity value
Apple maggot: A threat to California's apple industry
by Johannes L. Joos, William W. Allen, Robert A. Van Steenwyk
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Containment appears feasible, but chances for eradication are uncertain
The cause and control of prune brownline disease
by Jeff W. Hoy, John S. M. Mircetich, Richard S. Bethell, James E. DeTar, David M. Holmberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Prune brownline, a recently-recognized disease of prune trees, is widespread in northern California, causing considerable losses in Solano, Yolo, and El Dorado counties. The disease has also been found in Sutter, Tehama, Yuba, and Placer County orchards, but the extent of its occurrence in other California prune-growing areas has not been determined.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Prune brownline, a recently-recognized disease of prune trees, is widespread in northern California, causing considerable losses in Solano, Yolo, and El Dorado counties. The disease has also been found in Sutter, Tehama, Yuba, and Placer County orchards, but the extent of its occurrence in other California prune-growing areas has not been determined.
Responses of pomegranates to ethylene treatment and storage temperature
by Adel A. Kader, Alexander Chordas, Salaheddin Elyatem
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fully ripe fruit can be safely stored for long periods if not over-chilled
Deep cultivation and gypsum as potential solutions to slow water penetration
by Michael J. Singer, John R. Munn, William E. Wildman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 2.5 million acres of California farmland have some form of water penetration problem during the irrigation season, according to a recent survey by Cooperative Extension farm advisors. In some cases, simply increasing the length or frequency of irrigation may alleviate the problem and provide sufficient water to the crop. In other cases, the problem is more serious: crop yields are reduced and health and vigor of trees and vines are adversely affected, even with careful water management.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 2.5 million acres of California farmland have some form of water penetration problem during the irrigation season, according to a recent survey by Cooperative Extension farm advisors. In some cases, simply increasing the length or frequency of irrigation may alleviate the problem and provide sufficient water to the crop. In other cases, the problem is more serious: crop yields are reduced and health and vigor of trees and vines are adversely affected, even with careful water management.
Managing spider mites in almonds with pesticide-resistant predators
by Marjorie A. Hoy, William W. Barnett, Lonnie C. Hendricks, Darryl Castro, Daniel Cahn, Walter J. Bentley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the past three years, we have investigated the use of pesticide-resistant strains of spider mite predator released into almond orchards as components of an integrated management program. This predatory mite, Metaseiulus occidentalis (Nesbitt) provides effective biological control of the Pacific and two-spotted spider mites, Tetranychus pacificus McGregor and T. urticae Koch, respectively, as well as the European red mite, Panonychus ulmi (Koch).
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the past three years, we have investigated the use of pesticide-resistant strains of spider mite predator released into almond orchards as components of an integrated management program. This predatory mite, Metaseiulus occidentalis (Nesbitt) provides effective biological control of the Pacific and two-spotted spider mites, Tetranychus pacificus McGregor and T. urticae Koch, respectively, as well as the European red mite, Panonychus ulmi (Koch).
Purple spot and Stemphylium leaf spot of asparagus
by Peter G. Falloon, Linda M. Falloon, Raymond G. Grogan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: For several years, California asparagus growers have noticed purple spots that develop near the base of the spears before harvest. The condition is worse following cool, wet weather and was more severe during 1982 and 1983 than in previous years, resulting in higher rejection rates during cutting and packing.
Not available – first paragraph follows: For several years, California asparagus growers have noticed purple spots that develop near the base of the spears before harvest. The condition is worse following cool, wet weather and was more severe during 1982 and 1983 than in previous years, resulting in higher rejection rates during cutting and packing.
Combining gossyplure and insecticides in pink bollworm control
by C. A. Beasley, T. J. Henneberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Benefits have to be weighed against possible adverse effects on beneficial predators

News and Opinion

International trade research
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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