California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

Archive

May-June 1984
Volume 38, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Range fertilization in the Sierra Nevada foothills
by Charles A. Raguse, John L. Hull, Milton B. Jones, James G. Morris, Melvin R. George, Kent D. Olson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Following a year of preliminary experiments, a long-term, field-scale foothill range fertilization study began in 1982 with a series of precise applications to 385 acres of foothill rangeland comprising 12 fields on Forbes Hill at the University of California Sierra Foothill Range Field Station, Browns Valley. Because deficiencies of three major elements — nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur — limit production on soils of the region, we established the study to compare nitrogen alone, phosphorus plus sulfur, and combinations of the three elements. Since results from these treatments could be expected to differ from each other over time (irrespective of level of nutrient applied) it was essential to initiate treatments simultaneously, so that comparisons could be made within the same weather years.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Following a year of preliminary experiments, a long-term, field-scale foothill range fertilization study began in 1982 with a series of precise applications to 385 acres of foothill rangeland comprising 12 fields on Forbes Hill at the University of California Sierra Foothill Range Field Station, Browns Valley. Because deficiencies of three major elements — nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur — limit production on soils of the region, we established the study to compare nitrogen alone, phosphorus plus sulfur, and combinations of the three elements. Since results from these treatments could be expected to differ from each other over time (irrespective of level of nutrient applied) it was essential to initiate treatments simultaneously, so that comparisons could be made within the same weather years.
Prune leaves of summer-planted strawberries sparingly
by Norman C. Welch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Severe pruning reduces yields
Soil fumigation controls sudden wilt of melon
by Donald E. Munnecke, Franklin F. Laemmlen, James Bricker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fumigants control Pythium fungus infections and appreciably increase melon yields
Evapotranspiration losses of tomatoes under drip and furrow irrigation
by William O. Pruitt, Elias Fereres, Delbert W. Henderson, Robert M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Drip irrigation is frequently cited as a technique that can drastically reduce the irrigation water requirements of the principal crops in California. Compared with sprinkler or furrow irrigation, the drip method can result in great water saving during the years trees or vines are becoming established (see article on drip irrigation of almond trees, California Agriculture, September-October 1982). However, the potential water saving brought about by drip-irrigating row crops is uncertain.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Drip irrigation is frequently cited as a technique that can drastically reduce the irrigation water requirements of the principal crops in California. Compared with sprinkler or furrow irrigation, the drip method can result in great water saving during the years trees or vines are becoming established (see article on drip irrigation of almond trees, California Agriculture, September-October 1982). However, the potential water saving brought about by drip-irrigating row crops is uncertain.
Climate and dormancy data reduce need for many regional alfalfa trials
by Larry R. Teuber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Analysis of climatic and geographic data identified eight distinct alfalfa-growing regions
Economics of pest control alternatives for Imperial Valley cotton
by Thomas M. Burrows, Vahram Sevacherian, L. Joe Moffitt, John L. Baritelle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Despite yield variability risk, early termination appears most profitable practice
Sampling Tetranychus spider mites in almonds
by Frank G. Zalom, Lloyd T. Wilson, Marjorie A. Hoy, William W. Barnett, Janet M. Smilanick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Six species of spider mites are associated with almond trees in California's Central Valley. The lack of economical and reliable sampling techniques has hampered not only research on these mites but also the grower's ability to estimate control status or population density in a minimum amount of time. Three of the six spider mite (tetrany-chid) species — the European red mite, brown almond mite, and citrus red mite — are occasionally abundant enough to require chemical treatment. European red mite and brown almond mite are most often found in the northern and central Valley, and the citrus red mite, in citrus-producing areas of the southeastern Valley.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Six species of spider mites are associated with almond trees in California's Central Valley. The lack of economical and reliable sampling techniques has hampered not only research on these mites but also the grower's ability to estimate control status or population density in a minimum amount of time. Three of the six spider mite (tetrany-chid) species — the European red mite, brown almond mite, and citrus red mite — are occasionally abundant enough to require chemical treatment. European red mite and brown almond mite are most often found in the northern and central Valley, and the citrus red mite, in citrus-producing areas of the southeastern Valley.
Blue gum plantations analyzed for economic return
by James A. Rinehart, Richard B. Standiford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Under projected interest rates, plantations wouldn't be profitable on low-quality sites
New data on the grape bud beetle
by Vernon M. Stern, Judy A. Johnson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Effective controls are available, but suppression may require two years

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Agricultural research is on trial
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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May-June 1984
Volume 38, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Range fertilization in the Sierra Nevada foothills
by Charles A. Raguse, John L. Hull, Milton B. Jones, James G. Morris, Melvin R. George, Kent D. Olson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Following a year of preliminary experiments, a long-term, field-scale foothill range fertilization study began in 1982 with a series of precise applications to 385 acres of foothill rangeland comprising 12 fields on Forbes Hill at the University of California Sierra Foothill Range Field Station, Browns Valley. Because deficiencies of three major elements — nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur — limit production on soils of the region, we established the study to compare nitrogen alone, phosphorus plus sulfur, and combinations of the three elements. Since results from these treatments could be expected to differ from each other over time (irrespective of level of nutrient applied) it was essential to initiate treatments simultaneously, so that comparisons could be made within the same weather years.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Following a year of preliminary experiments, a long-term, field-scale foothill range fertilization study began in 1982 with a series of precise applications to 385 acres of foothill rangeland comprising 12 fields on Forbes Hill at the University of California Sierra Foothill Range Field Station, Browns Valley. Because deficiencies of three major elements — nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur — limit production on soils of the region, we established the study to compare nitrogen alone, phosphorus plus sulfur, and combinations of the three elements. Since results from these treatments could be expected to differ from each other over time (irrespective of level of nutrient applied) it was essential to initiate treatments simultaneously, so that comparisons could be made within the same weather years.
Prune leaves of summer-planted strawberries sparingly
by Norman C. Welch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Severe pruning reduces yields
Soil fumigation controls sudden wilt of melon
by Donald E. Munnecke, Franklin F. Laemmlen, James Bricker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fumigants control Pythium fungus infections and appreciably increase melon yields
Evapotranspiration losses of tomatoes under drip and furrow irrigation
by William O. Pruitt, Elias Fereres, Delbert W. Henderson, Robert M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Drip irrigation is frequently cited as a technique that can drastically reduce the irrigation water requirements of the principal crops in California. Compared with sprinkler or furrow irrigation, the drip method can result in great water saving during the years trees or vines are becoming established (see article on drip irrigation of almond trees, California Agriculture, September-October 1982). However, the potential water saving brought about by drip-irrigating row crops is uncertain.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Drip irrigation is frequently cited as a technique that can drastically reduce the irrigation water requirements of the principal crops in California. Compared with sprinkler or furrow irrigation, the drip method can result in great water saving during the years trees or vines are becoming established (see article on drip irrigation of almond trees, California Agriculture, September-October 1982). However, the potential water saving brought about by drip-irrigating row crops is uncertain.
Climate and dormancy data reduce need for many regional alfalfa trials
by Larry R. Teuber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Analysis of climatic and geographic data identified eight distinct alfalfa-growing regions
Economics of pest control alternatives for Imperial Valley cotton
by Thomas M. Burrows, Vahram Sevacherian, L. Joe Moffitt, John L. Baritelle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Despite yield variability risk, early termination appears most profitable practice
Sampling Tetranychus spider mites in almonds
by Frank G. Zalom, Lloyd T. Wilson, Marjorie A. Hoy, William W. Barnett, Janet M. Smilanick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Six species of spider mites are associated with almond trees in California's Central Valley. The lack of economical and reliable sampling techniques has hampered not only research on these mites but also the grower's ability to estimate control status or population density in a minimum amount of time. Three of the six spider mite (tetrany-chid) species — the European red mite, brown almond mite, and citrus red mite — are occasionally abundant enough to require chemical treatment. European red mite and brown almond mite are most often found in the northern and central Valley, and the citrus red mite, in citrus-producing areas of the southeastern Valley.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Six species of spider mites are associated with almond trees in California's Central Valley. The lack of economical and reliable sampling techniques has hampered not only research on these mites but also the grower's ability to estimate control status or population density in a minimum amount of time. Three of the six spider mite (tetrany-chid) species — the European red mite, brown almond mite, and citrus red mite — are occasionally abundant enough to require chemical treatment. European red mite and brown almond mite are most often found in the northern and central Valley, and the citrus red mite, in citrus-producing areas of the southeastern Valley.
Blue gum plantations analyzed for economic return
by James A. Rinehart, Richard B. Standiford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Under projected interest rates, plantations wouldn't be profitable on low-quality sites
New data on the grape bud beetle
by Vernon M. Stern, Judy A. Johnson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Effective controls are available, but suppression may require two years

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Agricultural research is on trial
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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