California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

May-June 1983
Volume 37, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Biological control of grape leafhopper
by Hiroshi Kido, Donald L. Flaherty, Daniel F. Bosch, Karen A. Valero
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Prune orchards discovered to be a good source of grape leafhopper parasite
Evaluating riprapping and other streambank stabilization techniques
by Joe R. McBride, Jan Strahan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stabilization of streambanks along creeks and rivers throughout California is an important means of protecting agricultural land from erosion. Riprapping, willow planting, and other methods of bank stabilization effective in curtailing erosion are often considered limiting to the establishment of native riparian woodlands. Recent research has suggested that retention of natural woodlands is an important means of preventing bank erosion. Therefore, stabilization techniques that do not prevent the establishment of riparian woodland species should provide additional streambank protection. The study reported here evaluates the influence of several streambank stabilization methods on the establishment of riparian woodlands and compares treated areas and native streamside woodlands with regard to species composition and density.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stabilization of streambanks along creeks and rivers throughout California is an important means of protecting agricultural land from erosion. Riprapping, willow planting, and other methods of bank stabilization effective in curtailing erosion are often considered limiting to the establishment of native riparian woodlands. Recent research has suggested that retention of natural woodlands is an important means of preventing bank erosion. Therefore, stabilization techniques that do not prevent the establishment of riparian woodland species should provide additional streambank protection. The study reported here evaluates the influence of several streambank stabilization methods on the establishment of riparian woodlands and compares treated areas and native streamside woodlands with regard to species composition and density.
Reducing bacterial canker damage in French prunes
by James E. DeVay, Harley English, Benjamin F. Lownsbery, Frank J. Schick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Backhoe-fumigation treatments were extremely effective. Peach rootstock also was beneficial.
Hard seed ensures rose clover survival on rangeland
by William N. Helphinstine, Victor W. Brown, R. Merton Love
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Rose clover seeds germinated for over a decade after passing through the digestive system of cattle.
Reasons for the decline in beef consumption
by Desmond A. Jolly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Health concerns played a part but price was most important
Phosphorus deficiency in California vineyards
by James A. Cook, William R. Ward, Alan S. Wicks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some higher elevation vineyards respond dramatically to phosphorus fertilizer
Initial insemination interval: One approach to improving turkey fertility
by Francine A. Bradley, Frank X. Ogasawara
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the past 30 years, there have been decided increases in the reproductive efficiency of turkeys. Refinements in artificial insemination techniques have eliminated problems associated with natural mating, such as injury to the hen, clumsiness of the male, and preferential mating. Specially formulated diluents have made it possible to extend the semen from superior toms and reduce costs associated with maintaining large numbers of males. However, the turkey breeder hen still does not produce fertile eggs at the same level or with the same persistency as the chicken breeder hen.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the past 30 years, there have been decided increases in the reproductive efficiency of turkeys. Refinements in artificial insemination techniques have eliminated problems associated with natural mating, such as injury to the hen, clumsiness of the male, and preferential mating. Specially formulated diluents have made it possible to extend the semen from superior toms and reduce costs associated with maintaining large numbers of males. However, the turkey breeder hen still does not produce fertile eggs at the same level or with the same persistency as the chicken breeder hen.
Propagating fast-growing eucalypts for energy crops
by Clifford B. Low, Gary H. Matson, Roy M. Sachs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
High rooting success has been achieved from seedling cuttings
Extruded soybeans for mid-lactation Holsteins milked 3X daily
by Thomas A. Shultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The dairy cow, like other ruminants, has four compartments in its stomach. The first compartment, the rumen, partially degrades feedstuffs by anaerobic microbial fermentation processes. The fourth compartment, or abomasum, corresponds to the single stomach of nonruminants, where final degradation of ingested material takes place.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The dairy cow, like other ruminants, has four compartments in its stomach. The first compartment, the rumen, partially degrades feedstuffs by anaerobic microbial fermentation processes. The fourth compartment, or abomasum, corresponds to the single stomach of nonruminants, where final degradation of ingested material takes place.
Monitoring aphids on Brussels sprouts
by Carolyn Pickel, Robert C. Mount, Frank G. Zalom, Lloyd T. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: California Brussels sprout growers, lacking adequate sampling techniques to determine economically significant damage by insects, historically have applied preventive sprays of pesticide combinations after each irrigation (approximately every 18 days). An average of 19 pounds (active ingredient) of insecticides per acre were applied by growers in 1981.
Not available – first paragraph follows: California Brussels sprout growers, lacking adequate sampling techniques to determine economically significant damage by insects, historically have applied preventive sprays of pesticide combinations after each irrigation (approximately every 18 days). An average of 19 pounds (active ingredient) of insecticides per acre were applied by growers in 1981.
California property tax shifts before Proposition 13
by Michael Arnold
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Local government spending wasn't “out of control” as commonly thought
Economic analysis of navel orangeworm control in almonds
by Joseph C. Headley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
There is enough money involved to justify detailed evaluation
Farmers' markets are good for downtown
by Jason Tyburczy, Robert Sommer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
They can help revitalize declining city center shopping areas

News and opinion

The price of freedom
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=37_5

May-June 1983
Volume 37, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Biological control of grape leafhopper
by Hiroshi Kido, Donald L. Flaherty, Daniel F. Bosch, Karen A. Valero
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Prune orchards discovered to be a good source of grape leafhopper parasite
Evaluating riprapping and other streambank stabilization techniques
by Joe R. McBride, Jan Strahan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stabilization of streambanks along creeks and rivers throughout California is an important means of protecting agricultural land from erosion. Riprapping, willow planting, and other methods of bank stabilization effective in curtailing erosion are often considered limiting to the establishment of native riparian woodlands. Recent research has suggested that retention of natural woodlands is an important means of preventing bank erosion. Therefore, stabilization techniques that do not prevent the establishment of riparian woodland species should provide additional streambank protection. The study reported here evaluates the influence of several streambank stabilization methods on the establishment of riparian woodlands and compares treated areas and native streamside woodlands with regard to species composition and density.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stabilization of streambanks along creeks and rivers throughout California is an important means of protecting agricultural land from erosion. Riprapping, willow planting, and other methods of bank stabilization effective in curtailing erosion are often considered limiting to the establishment of native riparian woodlands. Recent research has suggested that retention of natural woodlands is an important means of preventing bank erosion. Therefore, stabilization techniques that do not prevent the establishment of riparian woodland species should provide additional streambank protection. The study reported here evaluates the influence of several streambank stabilization methods on the establishment of riparian woodlands and compares treated areas and native streamside woodlands with regard to species composition and density.
Reducing bacterial canker damage in French prunes
by James E. DeVay, Harley English, Benjamin F. Lownsbery, Frank J. Schick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Backhoe-fumigation treatments were extremely effective. Peach rootstock also was beneficial.
Hard seed ensures rose clover survival on rangeland
by William N. Helphinstine, Victor W. Brown, R. Merton Love
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Rose clover seeds germinated for over a decade after passing through the digestive system of cattle.
Reasons for the decline in beef consumption
by Desmond A. Jolly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Health concerns played a part but price was most important
Phosphorus deficiency in California vineyards
by James A. Cook, William R. Ward, Alan S. Wicks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some higher elevation vineyards respond dramatically to phosphorus fertilizer
Initial insemination interval: One approach to improving turkey fertility
by Francine A. Bradley, Frank X. Ogasawara
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the past 30 years, there have been decided increases in the reproductive efficiency of turkeys. Refinements in artificial insemination techniques have eliminated problems associated with natural mating, such as injury to the hen, clumsiness of the male, and preferential mating. Specially formulated diluents have made it possible to extend the semen from superior toms and reduce costs associated with maintaining large numbers of males. However, the turkey breeder hen still does not produce fertile eggs at the same level or with the same persistency as the chicken breeder hen.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the past 30 years, there have been decided increases in the reproductive efficiency of turkeys. Refinements in artificial insemination techniques have eliminated problems associated with natural mating, such as injury to the hen, clumsiness of the male, and preferential mating. Specially formulated diluents have made it possible to extend the semen from superior toms and reduce costs associated with maintaining large numbers of males. However, the turkey breeder hen still does not produce fertile eggs at the same level or with the same persistency as the chicken breeder hen.
Propagating fast-growing eucalypts for energy crops
by Clifford B. Low, Gary H. Matson, Roy M. Sachs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
High rooting success has been achieved from seedling cuttings
Extruded soybeans for mid-lactation Holsteins milked 3X daily
by Thomas A. Shultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The dairy cow, like other ruminants, has four compartments in its stomach. The first compartment, the rumen, partially degrades feedstuffs by anaerobic microbial fermentation processes. The fourth compartment, or abomasum, corresponds to the single stomach of nonruminants, where final degradation of ingested material takes place.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The dairy cow, like other ruminants, has four compartments in its stomach. The first compartment, the rumen, partially degrades feedstuffs by anaerobic microbial fermentation processes. The fourth compartment, or abomasum, corresponds to the single stomach of nonruminants, where final degradation of ingested material takes place.
Monitoring aphids on Brussels sprouts
by Carolyn Pickel, Robert C. Mount, Frank G. Zalom, Lloyd T. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: California Brussels sprout growers, lacking adequate sampling techniques to determine economically significant damage by insects, historically have applied preventive sprays of pesticide combinations after each irrigation (approximately every 18 days). An average of 19 pounds (active ingredient) of insecticides per acre were applied by growers in 1981.
Not available – first paragraph follows: California Brussels sprout growers, lacking adequate sampling techniques to determine economically significant damage by insects, historically have applied preventive sprays of pesticide combinations after each irrigation (approximately every 18 days). An average of 19 pounds (active ingredient) of insecticides per acre were applied by growers in 1981.
California property tax shifts before Proposition 13
by Michael Arnold
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Local government spending wasn't “out of control” as commonly thought
Economic analysis of navel orangeworm control in almonds
by Joseph C. Headley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
There is enough money involved to justify detailed evaluation
Farmers' markets are good for downtown
by Jason Tyburczy, Robert Sommer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
They can help revitalize declining city center shopping areas

News and opinion

The price of freedom
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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