California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

March-April 1983
Volume 37, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Using “blowdown” water to irrigate crops
by William A. Jury, Lewis H. Stolzy, Carl A. Fox, Henry J. Vaux, Ian R. Straughan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Though not profitable, it could be less expensive than disposing of cooling water by evaporation
Foreign workers in selected California crops
by Richard Mines, Philip L. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some crops depend on a flow of illegal workers from Mexico
Side-whip grafting of grapevines to change over varieties
by Curtis J. Alley, Stephen F. Gallagher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Topworking vines earlier in the spring
Evaluating low-pressure sprinkler systems
by Blaine R. Hanson, Herbert Schulbach, Jewell L. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Use caution in modifying a system
Clipping chaparral as a brush-management technique
by Theodore E. Adams, Walter L. Graves
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
If done long enough, the technique might reduce total aboveground fuel load
Modifying weed sprayers for citrus thrips control
by Harold S. Elmer, O. L. Brawner, Joseph G. Morse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vertical booms attached to weed sprayers work well for citrus thrips control
Comparison of four crops for alcohol yield
by F. Jack Hills, Stanley S. Johnson, Shu Geng, Akbar Abshahi, Gary R. Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
One crop has no great advantage over others tested in this study
Fungicides for powdery mildew and rust in roses
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Nelson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew is undoubtedly the most widespread disease of roses. The casual fungus, Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae, appears as a white or gray powdery or mealy coating on the leaves, tender stems, and flowerbuds. It distorts and discolors those areas, causes defoliation, and reduces plant vigor.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew is undoubtedly the most widespread disease of roses. The casual fungus, Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae, appears as a white or gray powdery or mealy coating on the leaves, tender stems, and flowerbuds. It distorts and discolors those areas, causes defoliation, and reduces plant vigor.
California's low-income producer cooperatives
by Refugio I. Rochin, Steven Huffstutlar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
They're suited for some labor-intensive crops
Doubling potential of sweet cherry cultivars
by Warren C. Micke, James F. Doyle, James T. Yeager
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet cherry production in the Sacramento and southern San Joaquin valleys of California has historically been limited by excessive fruit doubling on the commonly grown cultivars. High summer temperatures at the time of flower bud differentiation are generally believed to cause double pistils to form, resulting in many double or spur (one side of the double aborted) fruit at harvest time the following year. Double and spur fruit are considered culls in commercial market channels, and they tend to be more prone to decay than normal cherries.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet cherry production in the Sacramento and southern San Joaquin valleys of California has historically been limited by excessive fruit doubling on the commonly grown cultivars. High summer temperatures at the time of flower bud differentiation are generally believed to cause double pistils to form, resulting in many double or spur (one side of the double aborted) fruit at harvest time the following year. Double and spur fruit are considered culls in commercial market channels, and they tend to be more prone to decay than normal cherries.
Monitoring lepidopterous pest damage to processing tomatoes
by Frank G. Zalom, Lloyd T. Wilson, Michael P. Hoffmann, W. Harry Lange, Craig V. Weakley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Few quantitative procedures exist for monitoring lepidopterous pests in processing tomatoes, yet reliable, cost-efficient sampling techniques are essential for the implementation of an integrated pest management program. These sampling techniques must be of such intensity as to predict the amount of damage with a given degree of reliability, yet sufficiently time-efficient to be useful to growers or crop consultants. Without such procedures, assessing a pest's status is subjective and may result in unnecessary control actions. Reliable control decision criteria are especially important in processing tomatoes, where thresholds for damage are set by government or industry standards, and exceeding damage thresholds can result in rejection of the crop.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Few quantitative procedures exist for monitoring lepidopterous pests in processing tomatoes, yet reliable, cost-efficient sampling techniques are essential for the implementation of an integrated pest management program. These sampling techniques must be of such intensity as to predict the amount of damage with a given degree of reliability, yet sufficiently time-efficient to be useful to growers or crop consultants. Without such procedures, assessing a pest's status is subjective and may result in unnecessary control actions. Reliable control decision criteria are especially important in processing tomatoes, where thresholds for damage are set by government or industry standards, and exceeding damage thresholds can result in rejection of the crop.
Fungus causes deterioration of dried prunes
by Peter L. Sholberg, Joseph M. Ogawa
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deterioration of dried French prunes is characterized by macerated, wet, sticky areas on the fruit surface and by skin that tends to slip with the slightest pressure. This condition is most often the result of fresh-fruit decay caused by the fungus Rhizopus stoioni/er. The mold is also known as “bread mold fungus” or the “whiskers disease” on fresh market stone fruits, strawberries, and almond hulls. Prune growers have called this type of deterioration of dried prunes “box rot” and have suspected it to be responsible for serious losses.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deterioration of dried French prunes is characterized by macerated, wet, sticky areas on the fruit surface and by skin that tends to slip with the slightest pressure. This condition is most often the result of fresh-fruit decay caused by the fungus Rhizopus stoioni/er. The mold is also known as “bread mold fungus” or the “whiskers disease” on fresh market stone fruits, strawberries, and almond hulls. Prune growers have called this type of deterioration of dried prunes “box rot” and have suspected it to be responsible for serious losses.
Incidental effects of agricultural water conservation
by David C. Davenport, Henry J. Vaux, Robert M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Conserving water can have both beneficial and adverse effects
Parasitic nematode controls western poplar clearwing moth
by Harry K. Kaya, James E. Lindegren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Borers were reduced by one treatment

News and opinion

The winrock report
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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March-April 1983
Volume 37, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Using “blowdown” water to irrigate crops
by William A. Jury, Lewis H. Stolzy, Carl A. Fox, Henry J. Vaux, Ian R. Straughan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Though not profitable, it could be less expensive than disposing of cooling water by evaporation
Foreign workers in selected California crops
by Richard Mines, Philip L. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some crops depend on a flow of illegal workers from Mexico
Side-whip grafting of grapevines to change over varieties
by Curtis J. Alley, Stephen F. Gallagher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Topworking vines earlier in the spring
Evaluating low-pressure sprinkler systems
by Blaine R. Hanson, Herbert Schulbach, Jewell L. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Use caution in modifying a system
Clipping chaparral as a brush-management technique
by Theodore E. Adams, Walter L. Graves
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
If done long enough, the technique might reduce total aboveground fuel load
Modifying weed sprayers for citrus thrips control
by Harold S. Elmer, O. L. Brawner, Joseph G. Morse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vertical booms attached to weed sprayers work well for citrus thrips control
Comparison of four crops for alcohol yield
by F. Jack Hills, Stanley S. Johnson, Shu Geng, Akbar Abshahi, Gary R. Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
One crop has no great advantage over others tested in this study
Fungicides for powdery mildew and rust in roses
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Nelson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew is undoubtedly the most widespread disease of roses. The casual fungus, Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae, appears as a white or gray powdery or mealy coating on the leaves, tender stems, and flowerbuds. It distorts and discolors those areas, causes defoliation, and reduces plant vigor.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew is undoubtedly the most widespread disease of roses. The casual fungus, Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae, appears as a white or gray powdery or mealy coating on the leaves, tender stems, and flowerbuds. It distorts and discolors those areas, causes defoliation, and reduces plant vigor.
California's low-income producer cooperatives
by Refugio I. Rochin, Steven Huffstutlar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
They're suited for some labor-intensive crops
Doubling potential of sweet cherry cultivars
by Warren C. Micke, James F. Doyle, James T. Yeager
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet cherry production in the Sacramento and southern San Joaquin valleys of California has historically been limited by excessive fruit doubling on the commonly grown cultivars. High summer temperatures at the time of flower bud differentiation are generally believed to cause double pistils to form, resulting in many double or spur (one side of the double aborted) fruit at harvest time the following year. Double and spur fruit are considered culls in commercial market channels, and they tend to be more prone to decay than normal cherries.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet cherry production in the Sacramento and southern San Joaquin valleys of California has historically been limited by excessive fruit doubling on the commonly grown cultivars. High summer temperatures at the time of flower bud differentiation are generally believed to cause double pistils to form, resulting in many double or spur (one side of the double aborted) fruit at harvest time the following year. Double and spur fruit are considered culls in commercial market channels, and they tend to be more prone to decay than normal cherries.
Monitoring lepidopterous pest damage to processing tomatoes
by Frank G. Zalom, Lloyd T. Wilson, Michael P. Hoffmann, W. Harry Lange, Craig V. Weakley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Few quantitative procedures exist for monitoring lepidopterous pests in processing tomatoes, yet reliable, cost-efficient sampling techniques are essential for the implementation of an integrated pest management program. These sampling techniques must be of such intensity as to predict the amount of damage with a given degree of reliability, yet sufficiently time-efficient to be useful to growers or crop consultants. Without such procedures, assessing a pest's status is subjective and may result in unnecessary control actions. Reliable control decision criteria are especially important in processing tomatoes, where thresholds for damage are set by government or industry standards, and exceeding damage thresholds can result in rejection of the crop.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Few quantitative procedures exist for monitoring lepidopterous pests in processing tomatoes, yet reliable, cost-efficient sampling techniques are essential for the implementation of an integrated pest management program. These sampling techniques must be of such intensity as to predict the amount of damage with a given degree of reliability, yet sufficiently time-efficient to be useful to growers or crop consultants. Without such procedures, assessing a pest's status is subjective and may result in unnecessary control actions. Reliable control decision criteria are especially important in processing tomatoes, where thresholds for damage are set by government or industry standards, and exceeding damage thresholds can result in rejection of the crop.
Fungus causes deterioration of dried prunes
by Peter L. Sholberg, Joseph M. Ogawa
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deterioration of dried French prunes is characterized by macerated, wet, sticky areas on the fruit surface and by skin that tends to slip with the slightest pressure. This condition is most often the result of fresh-fruit decay caused by the fungus Rhizopus stoioni/er. The mold is also known as “bread mold fungus” or the “whiskers disease” on fresh market stone fruits, strawberries, and almond hulls. Prune growers have called this type of deterioration of dried prunes “box rot” and have suspected it to be responsible for serious losses.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deterioration of dried French prunes is characterized by macerated, wet, sticky areas on the fruit surface and by skin that tends to slip with the slightest pressure. This condition is most often the result of fresh-fruit decay caused by the fungus Rhizopus stoioni/er. The mold is also known as “bread mold fungus” or the “whiskers disease” on fresh market stone fruits, strawberries, and almond hulls. Prune growers have called this type of deterioration of dried prunes “box rot” and have suspected it to be responsible for serious losses.
Incidental effects of agricultural water conservation
by David C. Davenport, Henry J. Vaux, Robert M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Conserving water can have both beneficial and adverse effects
Parasitic nematode controls western poplar clearwing moth
by Harry K. Kaya, James E. Lindegren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Borers were reduced by one treatment

News and opinion

The winrock report
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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