California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

March-April 1982
Volume 36, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Grapevines show seasonal differences in susceptibility to eutypa
by Curtis H. Petzoldt, William J. Moller, Mary Ann Sall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Produced in masses of these dark fruiting bodies on old, dead wood, Eutypa spores are the source of grapevine dieback disease. Rain causes the fruiting bodies to disgorge thespores, which drift onto new pruning wounds in vineyards. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
Early-winter pruning results in the highest probability of infection; March pruning, the least.
Chemical control of phomopsis grapevine cane and leaf spot disease
by Jim D. Cucuzza, Mary Ann Sall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Dormant and properly timed foliar chemical treatments reduced severity of phomopsis disease in a two-year vineyard study.
Dormant or spring chemical applications controlled phomopsis
Vineyard cultural practices may help reduce botrytis bunch rot
by Steven D. Savage, Mary Ann Sall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The two-wire trellis, midseason hedging, and a bloom-time fungicide spray each was associated with reduced bunch rot in vineyard tests.
Two-wire trellising and midseason hedging help minimize botrytis bunch rot, possibly by influencing the vine's microclimate.
Observations on Bodmin Nu-Pulse milking system
by Thomas A. Shultz, Richard N. Eide, Larry S. Collar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Bodmin self-adjusting vacuum pulsation unit performed satisfactorily, provided cleaning procedures were followed carefully.
Trunk injection corrects iron deficiency in plum trees
by Frank T. Yoshikawa, Wilbur O. Reil, Leslie K. Stromberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Injecting a ferrous sulfate solution into trunks of three-year-old plum trees corrected iron deficiency symptoms for two years.
Injections of ferrous sulfate appear to alleviate iron deficiency for about two years at a cost of 3 per tree.
Celery yields and uniformity are affected by pre-transplant practices
by Norman C. Welch, John W. Inman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Eliminating weak and very vigorous celery plants before transplanting and keeping roots moist improved yield and uniformity.
Growers can select for easy-to-handle transplants without significantly reducing yield or increasing stalk size variation.
Two insects offer potential biological control of common purslane
by Stephen L. Clement, Robert F. Norris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The purslane sawfly and portulaca leafmining weevil feed on the weed, apparently reducing its competitiveness and seed production.
They stress the weeds, reducing their vigor and seed production.
Mites: A primary food source for two predators in San Joaquin Valley cotton
by D. Gonzlez, Bonnie Ruth Patterson, Thomas F. Leigh, L. Theodore Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cotton field trials suggest that economic thresholds should take into account the value of secondary pests as food for predators.

News and opinion

The collaborative role of research and extension
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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March-April 1982
Volume 36, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Grapevines show seasonal differences in susceptibility to eutypa
by Curtis H. Petzoldt, William J. Moller, Mary Ann Sall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Produced in masses of these dark fruiting bodies on old, dead wood, Eutypa spores are the source of grapevine dieback disease. Rain causes the fruiting bodies to disgorge thespores, which drift onto new pruning wounds in vineyards. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
Early-winter pruning results in the highest probability of infection; March pruning, the least.
Chemical control of phomopsis grapevine cane and leaf spot disease
by Jim D. Cucuzza, Mary Ann Sall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Dormant and properly timed foliar chemical treatments reduced severity of phomopsis disease in a two-year vineyard study.
Dormant or spring chemical applications controlled phomopsis
Vineyard cultural practices may help reduce botrytis bunch rot
by Steven D. Savage, Mary Ann Sall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The two-wire trellis, midseason hedging, and a bloom-time fungicide spray each was associated with reduced bunch rot in vineyard tests.
Two-wire trellising and midseason hedging help minimize botrytis bunch rot, possibly by influencing the vine's microclimate.
Observations on Bodmin Nu-Pulse milking system
by Thomas A. Shultz, Richard N. Eide, Larry S. Collar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Bodmin self-adjusting vacuum pulsation unit performed satisfactorily, provided cleaning procedures were followed carefully.
Trunk injection corrects iron deficiency in plum trees
by Frank T. Yoshikawa, Wilbur O. Reil, Leslie K. Stromberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Injecting a ferrous sulfate solution into trunks of three-year-old plum trees corrected iron deficiency symptoms for two years.
Injections of ferrous sulfate appear to alleviate iron deficiency for about two years at a cost of 3 per tree.
Celery yields and uniformity are affected by pre-transplant practices
by Norman C. Welch, John W. Inman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Eliminating weak and very vigorous celery plants before transplanting and keeping roots moist improved yield and uniformity.
Growers can select for easy-to-handle transplants without significantly reducing yield or increasing stalk size variation.
Two insects offer potential biological control of common purslane
by Stephen L. Clement, Robert F. Norris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The purslane sawfly and portulaca leafmining weevil feed on the weed, apparently reducing its competitiveness and seed production.
They stress the weeds, reducing their vigor and seed production.
Mites: A primary food source for two predators in San Joaquin Valley cotton
by D. Gonzlez, Bonnie Ruth Patterson, Thomas F. Leigh, L. Theodore Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cotton field trials suggest that economic thresholds should take into account the value of secondary pests as food for predators.

News and opinion

The collaborative role of research and extension
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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