California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

September-October 1981
Volume 35, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Fuel alcohol from Jerusalem artichoke
by Roy M. Sachs, Clifford B. Low, Amit Vasavada, Michael J. Sully, Lynn A. Williams, George C. Ziobro
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tubers of this fast-growing plant could yield 25 to 30 gallons of alcohol per ton of fresh weight.It has nothing to do with Jerusalem, and it isn't an artichoke, but the plant may yield 600 gallons of ethanol per acre.
Problems with chemical control of pear psylla
by Helmut Riedl, Peter H. Westigard, Richard S. Bethell, James E. DeTar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The relatively new pyrethroid insecticides are effective against pear psylla, but intensive use can hasten resistance development.
Ethephon is of doubtful value on Thompson Seedless table grapes
by Harry L. Andris, Frederik L. Jensen, Robert H. Beede
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
An adverse color change outweighed the reduction in total acidity.
Bacterial blight on Persian walnuts
by Edward N. Mulrean, Milton N. Schroth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Researchers have shown that the walnut blight bacterium survives the winter in buds and catkins, complicating control strategies.
Wheat response to drought
by Robert E. Sojka, Lewis H. Stolzy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Measurement of drought sensitivity helps evaluate wheat cultivars for bad as well as good conditions.Although wheat cultivars tested responded similarly to full irrigation, some showed more stress than others in drought conditions.
Women in the agricultural labor market
by Juanita B. Wood, David H. Dupre, Orville E. Thompson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A survey of graduates of agricultural colleges indicates women have not yet broken the job barriers in agriculture.More women are entering the agricultural job market, but they still meet barriers in employment, salaries, and status.
Monitoring peach twig borer in almonds with sex pheromone traps
by Wilbur O. Reil, Toynette W. Johnson, Joseph C. Profita, Clarence S. Davis, Lonnie C. Hendricks, Donald Rough
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A total first-flight trap catch of 155 moths is suggested as the economic threshold of nut damage at harvest.Trap catches of first-flight PTB moths in spring can help predict nut damage at harvest and aid in making control decisions.
New monitoring methods for the walnut husk fly
by Helmut Riedl, Robert G. Hislop, William W. Barnett, William W. Coates, Larry B. Fitch, Johannes L. Joos, William H. Olson, Joseph C. Profita, Wallace R. Schreader
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Yellow rectangle baited with ammonium carbonate was more attractive to husk flies than Pherocon AM trap (center) or green sphere.Yellow ammonium-carbonate-baited rectangles caught the most husk flies, but the green spheres were better indicators of egg-laying.
Control of the walnut husk fly with pyrethroids and bait
by Robert G. Hislop, Helmut Riedl, Johannes L. Joos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Bait spray applied to part of the tree canopy attracted husk flies and provided control for the entire tree.Fenvalerate and permethrin controlled husk flies only when applied with bait. Both compounds caused late-season spider mite buildup.
Fertilizing summer-planted strawberries in California's Central Coast
by Norman C. Welch, James Quick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Nitrogen applied in slow-release form increased yields of summer- planted Tioga and Aiko strawberries in two years of production
Leafminer species causes California mum growers new problems
by Michael P. Parrella, William W. Allen, Pat Morishita
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Relatively new to California, Liriomyza trifolii has seriously damaged commercial mum crops. It seems resistant to most pesticides.
Liriomyza trifolii could become a problem on celery
by John T. Trumble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A Ieafminer new to California celery could cause serious damage if populations were to build up as they did in 1980.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Research, politics, and the public good
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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September-October 1981
Volume 35, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Fuel alcohol from Jerusalem artichoke
by Roy M. Sachs, Clifford B. Low, Amit Vasavada, Michael J. Sully, Lynn A. Williams, George C. Ziobro
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tubers of this fast-growing plant could yield 25 to 30 gallons of alcohol per ton of fresh weight.It has nothing to do with Jerusalem, and it isn't an artichoke, but the plant may yield 600 gallons of ethanol per acre.
Problems with chemical control of pear psylla
by Helmut Riedl, Peter H. Westigard, Richard S. Bethell, James E. DeTar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The relatively new pyrethroid insecticides are effective against pear psylla, but intensive use can hasten resistance development.
Ethephon is of doubtful value on Thompson Seedless table grapes
by Harry L. Andris, Frederik L. Jensen, Robert H. Beede
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
An adverse color change outweighed the reduction in total acidity.
Bacterial blight on Persian walnuts
by Edward N. Mulrean, Milton N. Schroth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Researchers have shown that the walnut blight bacterium survives the winter in buds and catkins, complicating control strategies.
Wheat response to drought
by Robert E. Sojka, Lewis H. Stolzy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Measurement of drought sensitivity helps evaluate wheat cultivars for bad as well as good conditions.Although wheat cultivars tested responded similarly to full irrigation, some showed more stress than others in drought conditions.
Women in the agricultural labor market
by Juanita B. Wood, David H. Dupre, Orville E. Thompson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A survey of graduates of agricultural colleges indicates women have not yet broken the job barriers in agriculture.More women are entering the agricultural job market, but they still meet barriers in employment, salaries, and status.
Monitoring peach twig borer in almonds with sex pheromone traps
by Wilbur O. Reil, Toynette W. Johnson, Joseph C. Profita, Clarence S. Davis, Lonnie C. Hendricks, Donald Rough
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A total first-flight trap catch of 155 moths is suggested as the economic threshold of nut damage at harvest.Trap catches of first-flight PTB moths in spring can help predict nut damage at harvest and aid in making control decisions.
New monitoring methods for the walnut husk fly
by Helmut Riedl, Robert G. Hislop, William W. Barnett, William W. Coates, Larry B. Fitch, Johannes L. Joos, William H. Olson, Joseph C. Profita, Wallace R. Schreader
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Yellow rectangle baited with ammonium carbonate was more attractive to husk flies than Pherocon AM trap (center) or green sphere.Yellow ammonium-carbonate-baited rectangles caught the most husk flies, but the green spheres were better indicators of egg-laying.
Control of the walnut husk fly with pyrethroids and bait
by Robert G. Hislop, Helmut Riedl, Johannes L. Joos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Bait spray applied to part of the tree canopy attracted husk flies and provided control for the entire tree.Fenvalerate and permethrin controlled husk flies only when applied with bait. Both compounds caused late-season spider mite buildup.
Fertilizing summer-planted strawberries in California's Central Coast
by Norman C. Welch, James Quick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Nitrogen applied in slow-release form increased yields of summer- planted Tioga and Aiko strawberries in two years of production
Leafminer species causes California mum growers new problems
by Michael P. Parrella, William W. Allen, Pat Morishita
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Relatively new to California, Liriomyza trifolii has seriously damaged commercial mum crops. It seems resistant to most pesticides.
Liriomyza trifolii could become a problem on celery
by John T. Trumble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A Ieafminer new to California celery could cause serious damage if populations were to build up as they did in 1980.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Research, politics, and the public good
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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