California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

May-June 1981
Volume 35, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Participation in federal farm commodity programs
by Randall A. Kramer, Rulon D. Pope, B. Delworth Gardner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Most California farmers consider the cost of lost income too high when compared with benefits of support programs involving acreage set-asides.Many California farmers have stayed out of federal price and income support programs for philosophical and economic reasons.
Are sierra lakes becoming acid?
by Gordon R. Bradford, Albert L. Page, Ian R. Straughan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tests show essentially no change in the acidity of Sierra lakes during the past 15 years.Samples taken in Sierra lakes in 1980 show essentially no change in acidity from those taken 15 years ago.
Resistance to sulfur in a vineyard spider mite predator
by Marjorie A. Hoy, Kathlyn A. Standow
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Colonies of a spider mite predator can survive sulfur applied to control powdery mildew.Sulfur resistance is inherited as a dominant gene, making predator strains with multiple resistance more easily obtained for use against spider mites in California vineyards.
Systemic nematicides tested as alternatives to DBCP
by Dewey J. Raski, Norman O. Jones, Saad L. Hafez, James J. Kissler, Donald A. Luvisi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
No replacement for DBCP in vineyards has been found, but several nonfumigant materials have shown promise in small-scale tests.
Sampling for nematodes
by Howard Ferris, Peter B. Goodell, Michael V. McKenry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A cost-efficient sampling process to reliably estimate nematode populations in the field.Efficient nematode control depends on reliable field-population sampling - a costly process being simplified by research.
A foliage blight of euonymus caused by Phytophthora
by Randolph Keim, Laura J. Klure, George A. Zentmyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fungicides help control a Phytophthora species that severely damages euonymus shrubs in southern California nurseries.
Stomatal response to soil oxygen
by Robert E. Sojka, Lewis H. Stolzy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New findings in stomatal response to oxygen could lead to changes in flood irrigation practices.Discovery that leaf pores (stomata) close when soil oxygen is low explains why plants wilt under flooding or high soil temperatures.
Simplified but scientific irrigation scheduling
by Elias Fereres, Patricia M. Kitlas, Richard E. Goldfien, William O. Pruitt, Robert M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Technically sound irrigation scheduling is made easier by precalculated programs that farmers can adjust to their own conditions.
Weeds may augment biological control of insects
by Miguel A. Altieri
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Outbreaks of some insect pests are more likely to occur in weed-free than in weed-diversified crops.Managing cropping systems and field borders to retain tolerable levels of weeds has reduced insect pests in many crops.

News and Opinion

An achilles heel for agricultural research
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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May-June 1981
Volume 35, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Participation in federal farm commodity programs
by Randall A. Kramer, Rulon D. Pope, B. Delworth Gardner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Most California farmers consider the cost of lost income too high when compared with benefits of support programs involving acreage set-asides.Many California farmers have stayed out of federal price and income support programs for philosophical and economic reasons.
Are sierra lakes becoming acid?
by Gordon R. Bradford, Albert L. Page, Ian R. Straughan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tests show essentially no change in the acidity of Sierra lakes during the past 15 years.Samples taken in Sierra lakes in 1980 show essentially no change in acidity from those taken 15 years ago.
Resistance to sulfur in a vineyard spider mite predator
by Marjorie A. Hoy, Kathlyn A. Standow
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Colonies of a spider mite predator can survive sulfur applied to control powdery mildew.Sulfur resistance is inherited as a dominant gene, making predator strains with multiple resistance more easily obtained for use against spider mites in California vineyards.
Systemic nematicides tested as alternatives to DBCP
by Dewey J. Raski, Norman O. Jones, Saad L. Hafez, James J. Kissler, Donald A. Luvisi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
No replacement for DBCP in vineyards has been found, but several nonfumigant materials have shown promise in small-scale tests.
Sampling for nematodes
by Howard Ferris, Peter B. Goodell, Michael V. McKenry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A cost-efficient sampling process to reliably estimate nematode populations in the field.Efficient nematode control depends on reliable field-population sampling - a costly process being simplified by research.
A foliage blight of euonymus caused by Phytophthora
by Randolph Keim, Laura J. Klure, George A. Zentmyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fungicides help control a Phytophthora species that severely damages euonymus shrubs in southern California nurseries.
Stomatal response to soil oxygen
by Robert E. Sojka, Lewis H. Stolzy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New findings in stomatal response to oxygen could lead to changes in flood irrigation practices.Discovery that leaf pores (stomata) close when soil oxygen is low explains why plants wilt under flooding or high soil temperatures.
Simplified but scientific irrigation scheduling
by Elias Fereres, Patricia M. Kitlas, Richard E. Goldfien, William O. Pruitt, Robert M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Technically sound irrigation scheduling is made easier by precalculated programs that farmers can adjust to their own conditions.
Weeds may augment biological control of insects
by Miguel A. Altieri
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Outbreaks of some insect pests are more likely to occur in weed-free than in weed-diversified crops.Managing cropping systems and field borders to retain tolerable levels of weeds has reduced insect pests in many crops.

News and Opinion

An achilles heel for agricultural research
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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