California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

September 1979
Volume 33, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

The commercial potential of dwarf fruit trees
by Paul E. Hansche, Claron O. Hesse, James Beutel, William Beres, James Doyle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Dwarfed peach and nectarine varieties, tests indicate, are more productive-for their size-than standard varieties. What remains in store for researchers: improvement of fruit quality.
The investment in agricultural research: A success story
by Carole Frank Nuckton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Does agricultural research pay off economically and who benefits if it does? The writer says (a) it does and (b) consumers benefit the most. Some of the social costs, however, should be studied and their problems solved.
Americans enjoy variety, quality, and abundance of food and fiber, thanks to ‘seed money’ investments.
Testing soybeans for resistance to spider mites
by Elmer C. Carlson, Benjamin H. Beard, Ronald Tarailo, Robert L. Witt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Breeding host-plant resistance to two spider mites would constitute a major development in the growing of soybeans in California. Some progress is indicated; more is necessary.
The search is on to find a way to reduce chemical control of two major soybean pests.
Nitrogen stabilization in the Pajaro Valley in lettuce, celery, and strawberries
by Norman C. Welch, Kent B. Tyler, David Ririe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tests with nitrification inhibitors show that they work: They prevent the leaching of nitrates beyond the reach of roots and thereby reduce the need of additional expensive applications of fertilizer.
If nitrapyrin becomes available, considerable savings in costs for fertilizing may be realized.
Chip-budding of mature grapevines
by Curtis J. Alley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Experiments conducted at Davis indicate that chip-budding of grapevines offers “take” results equal to that of T-budding without requiring much skill or the use of grafting compounds.

News and Opinion

Observations of China's agriculture
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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September 1979
Volume 33, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

The commercial potential of dwarf fruit trees
by Paul E. Hansche, Claron O. Hesse, James Beutel, William Beres, James Doyle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Dwarfed peach and nectarine varieties, tests indicate, are more productive-for their size-than standard varieties. What remains in store for researchers: improvement of fruit quality.
The investment in agricultural research: A success story
by Carole Frank Nuckton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Does agricultural research pay off economically and who benefits if it does? The writer says (a) it does and (b) consumers benefit the most. Some of the social costs, however, should be studied and their problems solved.
Americans enjoy variety, quality, and abundance of food and fiber, thanks to ‘seed money’ investments.
Testing soybeans for resistance to spider mites
by Elmer C. Carlson, Benjamin H. Beard, Ronald Tarailo, Robert L. Witt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Breeding host-plant resistance to two spider mites would constitute a major development in the growing of soybeans in California. Some progress is indicated; more is necessary.
The search is on to find a way to reduce chemical control of two major soybean pests.
Nitrogen stabilization in the Pajaro Valley in lettuce, celery, and strawberries
by Norman C. Welch, Kent B. Tyler, David Ririe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tests with nitrification inhibitors show that they work: They prevent the leaching of nitrates beyond the reach of roots and thereby reduce the need of additional expensive applications of fertilizer.
If nitrapyrin becomes available, considerable savings in costs for fertilizing may be realized.
Chip-budding of mature grapevines
by Curtis J. Alley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Experiments conducted at Davis indicate that chip-budding of grapevines offers “take” results equal to that of T-budding without requiring much skill or the use of grafting compounds.

News and Opinion

Observations of China's agriculture
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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