California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

July-August 1979
Volume 33, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Jojoba-a crop whose time has come
by Demetrios M. Yermanos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
As the world's fossil fuel reserves decline, the oil-bearing seeds of the California native, jojoba, are gaining new attention, and major efforts to domesticate it are underway.
‘Its prospects of developing into a profitable, energy-related, renewable resource appear to be excellent.’
Bacterial rot of sugarbeet: Problem and solution
by Milton N. Schroth, Elvin D. Whitney, Sherman V. Thomson, Robert T. Lewellen, F. Jackson Hills
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Bacterial rot has become a major problem in sugarbeets with widespread use of the new virus yellows-resistant varieties, US H9, and US H10. Now, researchers have come up with a new line that is not only yellows-resistant but also resistant to the bacterium, Erwinia betavasulorum.
Windbreak protection for wintering calves
by Stanton R. Morrison, Cecil Pierce, John Dunbar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Reduced performance in wintering cattle can be caused by cold stress. Windbreaks can prevent such stress and are inexpensive to construct.
High fructose corn syrup: An important new sugar substitute
by Peter K. Thor, Hoy F. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Growth of HFCS' use has had important economic implications to beet and cane sugar growers and processors since its commercial introduction in 1967.
Wine imports and policy issues
by Kirby S. Moulton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Foreign wines are gaining a larger share of the table wine market in the U.S., causing some decline in consumption of domestic wines and demands by American growers and vintners for import restrictions and other trade policy changes.
Stepped-up imports of wines into the U.S. are causing concern among domestic growers and vintners.
Reflective mulches foil insects
by Nick C. Toscano, Jeff Wyman, Ken Kido, Hunter Johnson, Keith Mayberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Use of reflective mulches (aluminum-coated paper and white polyethylene plastic) has been successful in deceiving aphids that would transmit watermelon mosaic virus to summer squash. Mineral oil sprays applied to foliage also prevent aphids from inoculating plants with virus.
Wilt and dieback of Canary Island palm in California
by Tolbert V. Feather, Howard D. Ohr, Donald E. Munnecke
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Canary Island palms in southern California have been destroyed in recent years by two fungi, operating singly and in combination: Gliocladium vermoeseni and Fusarium oxysporum. Study is in progress on control.
Response of durum and bread wheats to nitrogen fertilizer
by Kenneth G. Baghott, Yesh Paul Puri
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fertilization with nitrogen at different rates had a variety of effects on the growth and yield of two durum and two bread wheats studied in the Tulelake Basin. For example, Leeds durum responded to rates at 80 pounds or less per acre, while yield actually decreased at rates above 160 pounds.
Yields of four wheats tested increased when nitrogen was applied up to 80 pounds per acre.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Career opportunities in agriculture for minorities
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

The whirligig
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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July-August 1979
Volume 33, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Jojoba-a crop whose time has come
by Demetrios M. Yermanos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
As the world's fossil fuel reserves decline, the oil-bearing seeds of the California native, jojoba, are gaining new attention, and major efforts to domesticate it are underway.
‘Its prospects of developing into a profitable, energy-related, renewable resource appear to be excellent.’
Bacterial rot of sugarbeet: Problem and solution
by Milton N. Schroth, Elvin D. Whitney, Sherman V. Thomson, Robert T. Lewellen, F. Jackson Hills
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Bacterial rot has become a major problem in sugarbeets with widespread use of the new virus yellows-resistant varieties, US H9, and US H10. Now, researchers have come up with a new line that is not only yellows-resistant but also resistant to the bacterium, Erwinia betavasulorum.
Windbreak protection for wintering calves
by Stanton R. Morrison, Cecil Pierce, John Dunbar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Reduced performance in wintering cattle can be caused by cold stress. Windbreaks can prevent such stress and are inexpensive to construct.
High fructose corn syrup: An important new sugar substitute
by Peter K. Thor, Hoy F. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Growth of HFCS' use has had important economic implications to beet and cane sugar growers and processors since its commercial introduction in 1967.
Wine imports and policy issues
by Kirby S. Moulton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Foreign wines are gaining a larger share of the table wine market in the U.S., causing some decline in consumption of domestic wines and demands by American growers and vintners for import restrictions and other trade policy changes.
Stepped-up imports of wines into the U.S. are causing concern among domestic growers and vintners.
Reflective mulches foil insects
by Nick C. Toscano, Jeff Wyman, Ken Kido, Hunter Johnson, Keith Mayberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Use of reflective mulches (aluminum-coated paper and white polyethylene plastic) has been successful in deceiving aphids that would transmit watermelon mosaic virus to summer squash. Mineral oil sprays applied to foliage also prevent aphids from inoculating plants with virus.
Wilt and dieback of Canary Island palm in California
by Tolbert V. Feather, Howard D. Ohr, Donald E. Munnecke
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Canary Island palms in southern California have been destroyed in recent years by two fungi, operating singly and in combination: Gliocladium vermoeseni and Fusarium oxysporum. Study is in progress on control.
Response of durum and bread wheats to nitrogen fertilizer
by Kenneth G. Baghott, Yesh Paul Puri
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fertilization with nitrogen at different rates had a variety of effects on the growth and yield of two durum and two bread wheats studied in the Tulelake Basin. For example, Leeds durum responded to rates at 80 pounds or less per acre, while yield actually decreased at rates above 160 pounds.
Yields of four wheats tested increased when nitrogen was applied up to 80 pounds per acre.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Career opportunities in agriculture for minorities
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

The whirligig
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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