California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

November-December 1979
Volume 33, Number 11

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Agriculture in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta
by Terry L. Prichard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Delta, once considered a worthless swamp, has been transformed into an agricultural and recreational paradise by “men of determination.” Most of the old challenges have been met, but problems concerning the quantity and quality of its water require solutions.
Subirrigation in the Delta
by Ray Coppock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Delta's peatlands call for a unique subsurface irrigation system whereby river water is siphoned over levees and into unlined head ditches and small lateral ditches cut into the peat soil.
Farming organic soils of the Delta
by Franz R. Kegel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Crops grow well in the Delta's peat soils—but so do weeds. Growing crops that can compete successfully with weeds and withstand post-emergence herbicides is just one problem for farmers. Other problems: excessive soil moisture can delay spring planting, while surface dryness has created dust storms.
Subsurface movement of water and salt in Delta organic soils
by Blaine R. Hanson, Alan B. Carlton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Study began in 1977 to discover how irrigation water and groundwater move through Delta soil and the implications of their movement on soil salinity.
Mapping Delta water quality by remote sensing
by Editors
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Preliminary results of a recent study indicate that remote sensing will be useful in monitoring water quality in San Francisco Bay and the Delta—but there is a drawback: only the water's surface can be scanned.
Salinity in Delta peat soils
by Jewell L. Meyer, Terry L. Prichard, Franz R. Kegel, Robert J. Mullen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Dangerous accumulation of salt in Delta soil can occur when leaching is not effective, so researchers are trying to determine the most effective—and inexpensive—ways to prevent accumulation and/or to remove it.
Salt tolerance of corn in the Delta
by G. T. Hoffman, E. V. Maas, Jewell L. Meyer, Terry L. Prichard, Donald R. Lancaster
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sprinkler-irrigation and subirrigation treatments will be compared over the next three years to determine their effect on soil salinity and, consequently, the effect on corn production.
Caprification: A unique relationship between plant and insect
by Marvin Gerdts, Jack Kelly Clark
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The fig wasp, established since about 1900 in California to assist in obtaining fruit set in Calimyrna figs, also transmits disease. U.C. researchers have been successful in standardizing the “caprification” process—the transferring by the fig wasp of pollen from the male caprifig to Calimyrna fruits—and in improving fungicides to eradicate disease.
By transferring pollen from inedible caprifigs to edible Smyrna-types, a tiny wasp helps create an important commercial crop.
Beneficial bacteria enhance plant growth
by Trevor V. Suslow, Joseph W. Kloepper, Milton N. Schroth, Thomas J. Burr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Bacterization, the application of bacteria to soil and plant parts to promote growth and crop yield, was pioneered in the Soviet Union and now appears to be in the offing here, once methods for storing and applying have been improved.
Mold toxins: Hazard to animal and human health
by Brunhilde Kobbe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The mold on spoiled bread, fruit and vegetables is not harmless; researchers are just beginning to realize that some produce potent toxins and carcinogens.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Why patent publicly supported research discoveries?
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Correction
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
New strawberries introduced
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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November-December 1979
Volume 33, Number 11

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Agriculture in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta
by Terry L. Prichard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Delta, once considered a worthless swamp, has been transformed into an agricultural and recreational paradise by “men of determination.” Most of the old challenges have been met, but problems concerning the quantity and quality of its water require solutions.
Subirrigation in the Delta
by Ray Coppock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Delta's peatlands call for a unique subsurface irrigation system whereby river water is siphoned over levees and into unlined head ditches and small lateral ditches cut into the peat soil.
Farming organic soils of the Delta
by Franz R. Kegel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Crops grow well in the Delta's peat soils—but so do weeds. Growing crops that can compete successfully with weeds and withstand post-emergence herbicides is just one problem for farmers. Other problems: excessive soil moisture can delay spring planting, while surface dryness has created dust storms.
Subsurface movement of water and salt in Delta organic soils
by Blaine R. Hanson, Alan B. Carlton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Study began in 1977 to discover how irrigation water and groundwater move through Delta soil and the implications of their movement on soil salinity.
Mapping Delta water quality by remote sensing
by Editors
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Preliminary results of a recent study indicate that remote sensing will be useful in monitoring water quality in San Francisco Bay and the Delta—but there is a drawback: only the water's surface can be scanned.
Salinity in Delta peat soils
by Jewell L. Meyer, Terry L. Prichard, Franz R. Kegel, Robert J. Mullen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Dangerous accumulation of salt in Delta soil can occur when leaching is not effective, so researchers are trying to determine the most effective—and inexpensive—ways to prevent accumulation and/or to remove it.
Salt tolerance of corn in the Delta
by G. T. Hoffman, E. V. Maas, Jewell L. Meyer, Terry L. Prichard, Donald R. Lancaster
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sprinkler-irrigation and subirrigation treatments will be compared over the next three years to determine their effect on soil salinity and, consequently, the effect on corn production.
Caprification: A unique relationship between plant and insect
by Marvin Gerdts, Jack Kelly Clark
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The fig wasp, established since about 1900 in California to assist in obtaining fruit set in Calimyrna figs, also transmits disease. U.C. researchers have been successful in standardizing the “caprification” process—the transferring by the fig wasp of pollen from the male caprifig to Calimyrna fruits—and in improving fungicides to eradicate disease.
By transferring pollen from inedible caprifigs to edible Smyrna-types, a tiny wasp helps create an important commercial crop.
Beneficial bacteria enhance plant growth
by Trevor V. Suslow, Joseph W. Kloepper, Milton N. Schroth, Thomas J. Burr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Bacterization, the application of bacteria to soil and plant parts to promote growth and crop yield, was pioneered in the Soviet Union and now appears to be in the offing here, once methods for storing and applying have been improved.
Mold toxins: Hazard to animal and human health
by Brunhilde Kobbe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The mold on spoiled bread, fruit and vegetables is not harmless; researchers are just beginning to realize that some produce potent toxins and carcinogens.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Why patent publicly supported research discoveries?
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Correction
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
New strawberries introduced
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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