California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

July 1977
Volume 31, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

T-bud grafting of grapevines
by Curtis J. Alley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A method used in Argentina and Mexico for T-budding dormant mature buds on fruiting vines at a high level was found to be quick, easy, and 90 to 95 percent effective.
Grape varieties can be changed at a high level by a simple procedure for grafting dormant T-buds on fruiting vines.
Lower ethephon rates effective in walnut harvest
by William H. Olson, G. Steven Sibbett, Gregory L. Carnill, George C. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When compared with untreated controls, all ethephon treatments - including those at lower, more concentrated rates than usual - increased the percentage of walnuts removed in the first harvest and improved hullability.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Previous research results have clearly demonstrated that early walnut harvest provides for the maximum quantity of light-colored kernels as well as the minimum amount of navel orange-worm damage.
Environmental upsets caused by chemical eradication
by Paul DeBach, Mike Rose
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Pesticides applied in a San Diego residential area in 1973 and 1974 to eradicate the Japanese beetle resulted in large increases in citrus pests formerly held under biological control.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An inordinate number of invading insect pests have been detected during the past 11 years in southern San Diego County. The first was citrus white-fly in 1966, then woolly whitefly later in 1966, the Japanese beetle in 1973, and the Oriental fruitfly in 1971 and 1974 (along with occasional captures of Mexican fruitflies in McPhail traps).
Fungicides protect apricot trees against dieback
by William J. Moller, David E. Ramos, W. Harley English, Norman W. Ross, Don Rough, Lonnie C. Hendricks, Ross R. Sanborn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Benzimidazole fungicides painted onto large pruning wounds protect apricot trees against Eutypa infection? Summer rather than fall pruning also helps prevent high infection rates, because the dieback fungus is spread during rainstorms.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California produces more than 95 percent of the nations apricot crop and this versatile tree fruit is also a favorite for home orchards. Limb dieback is a major cause of premature tree decline and death in the northern part on the state. The causal fungus, Eutypa armeniacae (impf. Cytosporina), spreads by means of spores carried in the air during rainstorms, and, when the spores find their way into fresh pruning wounds, the disease begins. Unpruned apricots are not affected.
High density orchards facilitate harvest
by Robert B. Fridley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Possible future harvest and thinning operations are considerations in planting and training new orchards. High density orchards with relatively small trees are adaptable to new technology but are also suited to present methods.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Decisions regarding high, medium, or low density orchards must include consideration of present and future mechanization. Tree size, shape, spacing, and pruning methods in established orchards limit the selection of new methods for performing cultural and harvest operations. Every effort should be made to plant and train new orchards so as to make them as adaptable as possible to new technology but also suited to present methods. Many tree crops will be harvested by hand labor for some time; yet we cannot afford to invest in new plantings without considering mechanization. The wisest plan is to consider hand operations now and mechanized operations in the future.
Walnut rootstocks compared
by L. Todd Browne, Lyndon C. Brown, David E. Ramos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although contrasting results were obtained at two trial locations when several rootstocks were compared for effects on growth and yield. Northern California Black and Arizona Black did well at both sites, and Eureka showed potential.
Partially exposed root system of Northern California Black walnut rootstock growing in a deep river-bottom soil.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Integrated pest management
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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July 1977
Volume 31, Number 7

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

T-bud grafting of grapevines
by Curtis J. Alley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A method used in Argentina and Mexico for T-budding dormant mature buds on fruiting vines at a high level was found to be quick, easy, and 90 to 95 percent effective.
Grape varieties can be changed at a high level by a simple procedure for grafting dormant T-buds on fruiting vines.
Lower ethephon rates effective in walnut harvest
by William H. Olson, G. Steven Sibbett, Gregory L. Carnill, George C. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When compared with untreated controls, all ethephon treatments - including those at lower, more concentrated rates than usual - increased the percentage of walnuts removed in the first harvest and improved hullability.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Previous research results have clearly demonstrated that early walnut harvest provides for the maximum quantity of light-colored kernels as well as the minimum amount of navel orange-worm damage.
Environmental upsets caused by chemical eradication
by Paul DeBach, Mike Rose
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Pesticides applied in a San Diego residential area in 1973 and 1974 to eradicate the Japanese beetle resulted in large increases in citrus pests formerly held under biological control.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An inordinate number of invading insect pests have been detected during the past 11 years in southern San Diego County. The first was citrus white-fly in 1966, then woolly whitefly later in 1966, the Japanese beetle in 1973, and the Oriental fruitfly in 1971 and 1974 (along with occasional captures of Mexican fruitflies in McPhail traps).
Fungicides protect apricot trees against dieback
by William J. Moller, David E. Ramos, W. Harley English, Norman W. Ross, Don Rough, Lonnie C. Hendricks, Ross R. Sanborn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Benzimidazole fungicides painted onto large pruning wounds protect apricot trees against Eutypa infection? Summer rather than fall pruning also helps prevent high infection rates, because the dieback fungus is spread during rainstorms.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California produces more than 95 percent of the nations apricot crop and this versatile tree fruit is also a favorite for home orchards. Limb dieback is a major cause of premature tree decline and death in the northern part on the state. The causal fungus, Eutypa armeniacae (impf. Cytosporina), spreads by means of spores carried in the air during rainstorms, and, when the spores find their way into fresh pruning wounds, the disease begins. Unpruned apricots are not affected.
High density orchards facilitate harvest
by Robert B. Fridley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Possible future harvest and thinning operations are considerations in planting and training new orchards. High density orchards with relatively small trees are adaptable to new technology but are also suited to present methods.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Decisions regarding high, medium, or low density orchards must include consideration of present and future mechanization. Tree size, shape, spacing, and pruning methods in established orchards limit the selection of new methods for performing cultural and harvest operations. Every effort should be made to plant and train new orchards so as to make them as adaptable as possible to new technology but also suited to present methods. Many tree crops will be harvested by hand labor for some time; yet we cannot afford to invest in new plantings without considering mechanization. The wisest plan is to consider hand operations now and mechanized operations in the future.
Walnut rootstocks compared
by L. Todd Browne, Lyndon C. Brown, David E. Ramos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although contrasting results were obtained at two trial locations when several rootstocks were compared for effects on growth and yield. Northern California Black and Arizona Black did well at both sites, and Eureka showed potential.
Partially exposed root system of Northern California Black walnut rootstock growing in a deep river-bottom soil.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Integrated pest management
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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