California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

February 1977
Volume 31, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Keeping small cities beautiful: Measuring quality of community life in nonmetropolitan cities
by Edward J. Blakely, Gala Rinaldi, Howard Schutz, Martin Zone
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A two-year study jointly conducted by U. C. Davis and Yuba City revealed that location, size, and rural atmosphere are the major factors attracting more and more people from urban areas to small cities. To retain these qualities, planning and growth control are needed.
A two-year study jointly conducted by U.C. Davis and Yuba City revealed that location, size, and rural atmosphere are the major factors attracting more and more people from urban areas to small cities. To retain these qualities, planning and growth control are needed.
Crop rotation improves nitrogen utilization
by Philip P. Osterli, Jewell L. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Crop rotation and efficient fertilization practices minimize the amount of nitrate nitrogen reaching groundwaters from fertilizers. Cereal crops reduce soil nitrogen levels by using nitrogen remaining after previous crops.
Crop rotation and efficient fertilization practices minimize the amount of nitrate nitrogen reaching groundwaters from fertilizers. Cereal crops reduce soil nitrogen levels by using nitrogen remaining after previous crops.
California oak tanks for California wine
by William A. Dost, Michael Gorvad
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Permeability studies show that California white oak containers will hold wine during aging with a minimum of loss from seepage and evaporation. Effects of this wood on wine quality were not evaluated.
Permeability studies show that California white oak containers will hold wine during wine aging with a minimum loss from seepage and evaporation. Effects of this wood on quality were not evaluated.
Antibiotic studies help feedlot calves
by Donald G. Addis, Gary A. Beall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Simultaneous injections of oxytetracycline (OTC) at several locations instead of a single location on the calf's body give higher OTC blood serum levels. Recent studies show the best way to administer the antibiotic is by intramuscular injection of not more than 10 to 20 cc per injection site.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Depending on the particular shipment, 25 to 90 percent of the feeder and stocker cattle coming into southern California desert feedlots get sick. Death losses and culling rates range from 6 to 8 percent among the lighter calves (250 to 400 pounds) and from ½ to 2½ percent for larger animals.
High-sugar sweet corn hybrids in southern California
by James W. Cameron
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
No new hybrids have yet been introduced, but some of the hybrids tested have many good qualities. Characteristics evaluated include plant vigor, ear length, husk cover, kernel sweetness and tenderness, and tolerance to ozone air pollution.
No new hybrids have yet been introduced, but some of the hybrids tested have many good qualities. Characteristics evaluated include plant vigor, ear length, husk cover, kernel sweetness and tenderness, and tolerance to ozone air pollution.
Weed control in processing tomatoes
by Arthur H. Lange, Warren E. Bendixen, Royce Goertzen, Bill B. Fischer, Harold M. Kempen, Harry S. Agamalian, Eugene E. Stevenson, Robert A. Brendler, Jack P. Orr, Robert J. Mullen, Floyd M. Ashton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Research is under way to find means of selectively controlling weeds of the tomato-potato family as well as nutsedge (nutgrass). Some herbicides show promise, and a technique of injecting fumigants into the soil is also being studied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: High yields in processing tomatoes depend on a great many factors, not the least of which is good weed control. Weeds compete severely with the tomato, primarily for water and light, and interfere with mechanical harvest. The arsenal of herbicides available for annual weed control in tomatoes is relatively large compared to those for other vegetable crops. However, because tomatoes are planted over a large range of soil types and weather conditions, it is difficult to make accurate general recommendations.
Fungicide controls botrytis in strawberry
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Nelson, Victor Voth, Howard Bowen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In a 1976 trial, the fungicide dichlofluanid gave the best control of Botrytis cinerea in strawberries. Benomyl treatments were not significantly different from the controls.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Botrytis fruit rot, commonly known as gray mold rot, is the major fruit rot of southern California strawberries. It is caused by the fungus, Botrytis cinerea, which thrives in wet conditions and cool temperatures. Because tolerance to benomyl by this fungus has been noted in the past several years, trials were initiated to test several other fungicides, alone and in combination with benomyl against B. cinerea.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Thirty years—progress and perspective
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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February 1977
Volume 31, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Keeping small cities beautiful: Measuring quality of community life in nonmetropolitan cities
by Edward J. Blakely, Gala Rinaldi, Howard Schutz, Martin Zone
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A two-year study jointly conducted by U. C. Davis and Yuba City revealed that location, size, and rural atmosphere are the major factors attracting more and more people from urban areas to small cities. To retain these qualities, planning and growth control are needed.
A two-year study jointly conducted by U.C. Davis and Yuba City revealed that location, size, and rural atmosphere are the major factors attracting more and more people from urban areas to small cities. To retain these qualities, planning and growth control are needed.
Crop rotation improves nitrogen utilization
by Philip P. Osterli, Jewell L. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Crop rotation and efficient fertilization practices minimize the amount of nitrate nitrogen reaching groundwaters from fertilizers. Cereal crops reduce soil nitrogen levels by using nitrogen remaining after previous crops.
Crop rotation and efficient fertilization practices minimize the amount of nitrate nitrogen reaching groundwaters from fertilizers. Cereal crops reduce soil nitrogen levels by using nitrogen remaining after previous crops.
California oak tanks for California wine
by William A. Dost, Michael Gorvad
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Permeability studies show that California white oak containers will hold wine during aging with a minimum of loss from seepage and evaporation. Effects of this wood on wine quality were not evaluated.
Permeability studies show that California white oak containers will hold wine during wine aging with a minimum loss from seepage and evaporation. Effects of this wood on quality were not evaluated.
Antibiotic studies help feedlot calves
by Donald G. Addis, Gary A. Beall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Simultaneous injections of oxytetracycline (OTC) at several locations instead of a single location on the calf's body give higher OTC blood serum levels. Recent studies show the best way to administer the antibiotic is by intramuscular injection of not more than 10 to 20 cc per injection site.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Depending on the particular shipment, 25 to 90 percent of the feeder and stocker cattle coming into southern California desert feedlots get sick. Death losses and culling rates range from 6 to 8 percent among the lighter calves (250 to 400 pounds) and from ½ to 2½ percent for larger animals.
High-sugar sweet corn hybrids in southern California
by James W. Cameron
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
No new hybrids have yet been introduced, but some of the hybrids tested have many good qualities. Characteristics evaluated include plant vigor, ear length, husk cover, kernel sweetness and tenderness, and tolerance to ozone air pollution.
No new hybrids have yet been introduced, but some of the hybrids tested have many good qualities. Characteristics evaluated include plant vigor, ear length, husk cover, kernel sweetness and tenderness, and tolerance to ozone air pollution.
Weed control in processing tomatoes
by Arthur H. Lange, Warren E. Bendixen, Royce Goertzen, Bill B. Fischer, Harold M. Kempen, Harry S. Agamalian, Eugene E. Stevenson, Robert A. Brendler, Jack P. Orr, Robert J. Mullen, Floyd M. Ashton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Research is under way to find means of selectively controlling weeds of the tomato-potato family as well as nutsedge (nutgrass). Some herbicides show promise, and a technique of injecting fumigants into the soil is also being studied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: High yields in processing tomatoes depend on a great many factors, not the least of which is good weed control. Weeds compete severely with the tomato, primarily for water and light, and interfere with mechanical harvest. The arsenal of herbicides available for annual weed control in tomatoes is relatively large compared to those for other vegetable crops. However, because tomatoes are planted over a large range of soil types and weather conditions, it is difficult to make accurate general recommendations.
Fungicide controls botrytis in strawberry
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Nelson, Victor Voth, Howard Bowen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In a 1976 trial, the fungicide dichlofluanid gave the best control of Botrytis cinerea in strawberries. Benomyl treatments were not significantly different from the controls.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Botrytis fruit rot, commonly known as gray mold rot, is the major fruit rot of southern California strawberries. It is caused by the fungus, Botrytis cinerea, which thrives in wet conditions and cool temperatures. Because tolerance to benomyl by this fungus has been noted in the past several years, trials were initiated to test several other fungicides, alone and in combination with benomyl against B. cinerea.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Thirty years—progress and perspective
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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