California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.8

Sequoia seedling adaptable for transplanting
August 1948
Volume 2, Number 8

Research articles

California big trees: Young trees make rapid growth and are adaptable to transplanting
by Woodbridge Metcalf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Young stands of California's big trees—the Sequoia gigantea—under study for 32 years have demonstrated the ability of the species to reproduce itself under favorable conditions, proving that the mammoth old trees need not be the last survivors of their kind.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Young stands of California's big trees—the Sequoia gigantea—under study for 32 years have demonstrated the ability of the species to reproduce itself under favorable conditions, proving that the mammoth old trees need not be the last survivors of their kind.
Stubborn disease: One cause of nonbearing in navels, Valencias, and grapefruit
by H. S. Fawcett, L. J. Klotz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: An increasing number of nonproductive trees sometimes noted in navel orange orchards as the trees advance in age may be due—in part—to the infectious disease known as stubborn disease.
Not available – first paragraph follows: An increasing number of nonproductive trees sometimes noted in navel orange orchards as the trees advance in age may be due—in part—to the infectious disease known as stubborn disease.
Scarlet grape: New variety for fresh juice and jellies
by H. P. Olmo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following extract is from Experiment Station Bulletin 706 which may be obtained without charge by addressing the Publications Office, College of Agriculture, University of California, Berkeley 4, California. Cuttings of this variety are not offered for sale or distribution by the University of California, but may be purchased from nurserymen.
The following extract is from Experiment Station Bulletin 706 which may be obtained without charge by addressing the Publications Office, College of Agriculture, University of California, Berkeley 4, California. Cuttings of this variety are not offered for sale or distribution by the University of California, but may be purchased from nurserymen.
Wool improvement: Seek to combine fleece of the Australasian Merino and body of the Rambouillet
by James F. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Merino sheep is the backbone of the wool growing industry of the West. No other breed of sheep can stand up to the vicissitudes of weather and poor environment half so well. All over the world's temperate zones, wherever the going is tough, through intense heat and great cold, where feed is sparse and animals must shift for themselves, the Merino or some breed heavily infused with its blood, predominates.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Merino sheep is the backbone of the wool growing industry of the West. No other breed of sheep can stand up to the vicissitudes of weather and poor environment half so well. All over the world's temperate zones, wherever the going is tough, through intense heat and great cold, where feed is sparse and animals must shift for themselves, the Merino or some breed heavily infused with its blood, predominates.
Pelleting vegetable seeds: Effect on germination and rate of emergence on some seeds
by J. C. Bishop
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Small, round or irregularly shaped seeds can be covered with a coating of inert material and built up into pellets almost spherical in shape and containing a single seed each.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Small, round or irregularly shaped seeds can be covered with a coating of inert material and built up into pellets almost spherical in shape and containing a single seed each.
Spray weed seedlings: When small for best control in noncultivation programs
by Richard E. Puffer, Burnell E. Yarick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citrus growers using a noncultivation program can save labor and material costs by accurately timing the application of their weed sprays.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citrus growers using a noncultivation program can save labor and material costs by accurately timing the application of their weed sprays.
Rootstocks for oranges: Identification by recognition of their foliage and bud union characteristics
by W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Accurate rootstock identification is difficult and sometimes nearly impossible by methods which ar known today.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Accurate rootstock identification is difficult and sometimes nearly impossible by methods which ar known today.
Grapefruit: Effects of 2,4-D sprays on preharvest drop, yield and quality
by W. S. Stewart, E. R. Parker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Studies on grapefruit in field experiments indicate that the application of 2,4-D may reduce preharvest fruit drop from 52% to 78%.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Studies on grapefruit in field experiments indicate that the application of 2,4-D may reduce preharvest fruit drop from 52% to 78%.
Prunes: Improved packing procedure and new use for cull fruit developed
by Agnes Fay Morgan, Mary Groody
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Studies Indicate Nutritional Value of Culls in Commercial Dog Foods
Studies Indicate Nutritional Value of Culls in Commercial Dog Foods
Prunes: Improved packing procedure and new use for cull fruit developed
by E. M. Mrak, H. J. Phaff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Superior Quality Pack for Special Markets Possible by New Procedure
Superior Quality Pack for Special Markets Possible by New Procedure
Liquid sugars: Studied in the freezing of apricots, peaches and nectarines
by M. A. Joslyn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Experimental packs of frozen apricots, peaches and nectarines—to study the protective effect of sugar—were begun in the summer of 1946.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Experimental packs of frozen apricots, peaches and nectarines—to study the protective effect of sugar—were begun in the summer of 1946.
The orange tortrix: Pest of citrus becoming of economic importance on deciduous fruit
by Arthur D. Borden
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The orange tortrix—Argyrotaenia cittrana—a worm which feeds on foliage and enters fruit, caused considerable damage to prunes and apples last season.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The orange tortrix—Argyrotaenia cittrana—a worm which feeds on foliage and enters fruit, caused considerable damage to prunes and apples last season.
Twig dieback: On orange and grapefruit trees
by L. J. Klotz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Severe twig dieback sometimes develops during the spring on navel, Valencia, and grapefruit trees, being particulary extensive on navel trees.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Severe twig dieback sometimes develops during the spring on navel, Valencia, and grapefruit trees, being particulary extensive on navel trees.
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=2_8

California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.8

Sequoia seedling adaptable for transplanting
August 1948
Volume 2, Number 8

Research articles

California big trees: Young trees make rapid growth and are adaptable to transplanting
by Woodbridge Metcalf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Young stands of California's big trees—the Sequoia gigantea—under study for 32 years have demonstrated the ability of the species to reproduce itself under favorable conditions, proving that the mammoth old trees need not be the last survivors of their kind.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Young stands of California's big trees—the Sequoia gigantea—under study for 32 years have demonstrated the ability of the species to reproduce itself under favorable conditions, proving that the mammoth old trees need not be the last survivors of their kind.
Stubborn disease: One cause of nonbearing in navels, Valencias, and grapefruit
by H. S. Fawcett, L. J. Klotz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: An increasing number of nonproductive trees sometimes noted in navel orange orchards as the trees advance in age may be due—in part—to the infectious disease known as stubborn disease.
Not available – first paragraph follows: An increasing number of nonproductive trees sometimes noted in navel orange orchards as the trees advance in age may be due—in part—to the infectious disease known as stubborn disease.
Scarlet grape: New variety for fresh juice and jellies
by H. P. Olmo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following extract is from Experiment Station Bulletin 706 which may be obtained without charge by addressing the Publications Office, College of Agriculture, University of California, Berkeley 4, California. Cuttings of this variety are not offered for sale or distribution by the University of California, but may be purchased from nurserymen.
The following extract is from Experiment Station Bulletin 706 which may be obtained without charge by addressing the Publications Office, College of Agriculture, University of California, Berkeley 4, California. Cuttings of this variety are not offered for sale or distribution by the University of California, but may be purchased from nurserymen.
Wool improvement: Seek to combine fleece of the Australasian Merino and body of the Rambouillet
by James F. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Merino sheep is the backbone of the wool growing industry of the West. No other breed of sheep can stand up to the vicissitudes of weather and poor environment half so well. All over the world's temperate zones, wherever the going is tough, through intense heat and great cold, where feed is sparse and animals must shift for themselves, the Merino or some breed heavily infused with its blood, predominates.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Merino sheep is the backbone of the wool growing industry of the West. No other breed of sheep can stand up to the vicissitudes of weather and poor environment half so well. All over the world's temperate zones, wherever the going is tough, through intense heat and great cold, where feed is sparse and animals must shift for themselves, the Merino or some breed heavily infused with its blood, predominates.
Pelleting vegetable seeds: Effect on germination and rate of emergence on some seeds
by J. C. Bishop
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Small, round or irregularly shaped seeds can be covered with a coating of inert material and built up into pellets almost spherical in shape and containing a single seed each.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Small, round or irregularly shaped seeds can be covered with a coating of inert material and built up into pellets almost spherical in shape and containing a single seed each.
Spray weed seedlings: When small for best control in noncultivation programs
by Richard E. Puffer, Burnell E. Yarick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citrus growers using a noncultivation program can save labor and material costs by accurately timing the application of their weed sprays.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citrus growers using a noncultivation program can save labor and material costs by accurately timing the application of their weed sprays.
Rootstocks for oranges: Identification by recognition of their foliage and bud union characteristics
by W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Accurate rootstock identification is difficult and sometimes nearly impossible by methods which ar known today.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Accurate rootstock identification is difficult and sometimes nearly impossible by methods which ar known today.
Grapefruit: Effects of 2,4-D sprays on preharvest drop, yield and quality
by W. S. Stewart, E. R. Parker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Studies on grapefruit in field experiments indicate that the application of 2,4-D may reduce preharvest fruit drop from 52% to 78%.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Studies on grapefruit in field experiments indicate that the application of 2,4-D may reduce preharvest fruit drop from 52% to 78%.
Prunes: Improved packing procedure and new use for cull fruit developed
by Agnes Fay Morgan, Mary Groody
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Studies Indicate Nutritional Value of Culls in Commercial Dog Foods
Studies Indicate Nutritional Value of Culls in Commercial Dog Foods
Prunes: Improved packing procedure and new use for cull fruit developed
by E. M. Mrak, H. J. Phaff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Superior Quality Pack for Special Markets Possible by New Procedure
Superior Quality Pack for Special Markets Possible by New Procedure
Liquid sugars: Studied in the freezing of apricots, peaches and nectarines
by M. A. Joslyn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Experimental packs of frozen apricots, peaches and nectarines—to study the protective effect of sugar—were begun in the summer of 1946.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Experimental packs of frozen apricots, peaches and nectarines—to study the protective effect of sugar—were begun in the summer of 1946.
The orange tortrix: Pest of citrus becoming of economic importance on deciduous fruit
by Arthur D. Borden
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The orange tortrix—Argyrotaenia cittrana—a worm which feeds on foliage and enters fruit, caused considerable damage to prunes and apples last season.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The orange tortrix—Argyrotaenia cittrana—a worm which feeds on foliage and enters fruit, caused considerable damage to prunes and apples last season.
Twig dieback: On orange and grapefruit trees
by L. J. Klotz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Severe twig dieback sometimes develops during the spring on navel, Valencia, and grapefruit trees, being particulary extensive on navel trees.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Severe twig dieback sometimes develops during the spring on navel, Valencia, and grapefruit trees, being particulary extensive on navel trees.

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/