California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.10

Irrigated pastures, forage and management
October 1948
Volume 2, Number 10

Research articles

Hidden fire losses: Uncontrolled fires costly to soils, plant cover, water and timber supplies
by Woodbridge Metcalf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Long time studies indicate that uncontrolled brush and forest fires profoundly affect soils, plant cover and water, as well as destroying man made structures and interfering with management plans for farms, forests and industries.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Long time studies indicate that uncontrolled brush and forest fires profoundly affect soils, plant cover and water, as well as destroying man made structures and interfering with management plans for farms, forests and industries.
Hard seeds in beans: Proper temperature and humidity during storage important for germination
by James F. Harrington
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Hard seeds have seed coats which retard the entrance of moisture into the seed. Seeds with hard coats are slow to swell. Since water is necessary for germination seeds do not germinate so long as they remain hard.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Hard seeds have seed coats which retard the entrance of moisture into the seed. Seeds with hard coats are slow to swell. Since water is necessary for germination seeds do not germinate so long as they remain hard.
Cattle grubs: Spray formula and application method recommended to reduce losses from pests
by Kenneth G. McKay, Deane P. Furman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cattle grubs cause an annual national loss of $50,000,000 to $100,000,000 to the livestock and dairy-industry according to estimates of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cattle grubs cause an annual national loss of $50,000,000 to $100,000,000 to the livestock and dairy-industry according to estimates of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Ketosis studied: Acetonemia and pregnancy disease dual problem in cows and in sheep
by Donald E. Jasper
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Symptoms of ketosis in dairy cows—in many cases—are almost identical to those of milk fever.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Symptoms of ketosis in dairy cows—in many cases—are almost identical to those of milk fever.
Irrigated pastures: Further studies planned on pasture varieties and management practices
by Maurice L. Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Irrigated pastures in California have increased to about 400,000 acres in approximately 15 years.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Irrigated pastures in California have increased to about 400,000 acres in approximately 15 years.
Mechanized sampling: Accurate description of growers' products by marketing and processing organizations possible
by A. M. Thym, Roy J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Accurate description of each lot of fruit and vegetables sent to marketing and processing organizations is necessary if each grower is to be paid what his product is worth.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Accurate description of each lot of fruit and vegetables sent to marketing and processing organizations is necessary if each grower is to be paid what his product is worth.
Crowded citrus orchards: Preliminary studies to determine effect of pruning practices in dense groves
by S. H. Cameron, R. W. Hodgson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Blocks of large orange trees now producing unsatisfactory crops—running largely to small sizes—are a problem in some of the older citrus growing districts of California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Blocks of large orange trees now producing unsatisfactory crops—running largely to small sizes—are a problem in some of the older citrus growing districts of California.
Nursery seedlings: Improved methods of production possible with control of damping-off disease
by Kenneth F. Baker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: New mechanized production techniques are being developed and adopted in the growing of seedlings because the damping-off disease now can be practically eliminated in commercial nurseries.
Not available – first paragraph follows: New mechanized production techniques are being developed and adopted in the growing of seedlings because the damping-off disease now can be practically eliminated in commercial nurseries.
Olive yields: Studies underway to determine causes and correction of irregular bearing
by H. T. Hartmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Reduced yields of oil olives the year following the season when the fruit is harvested late—in January and February—were izidicated by studies made in Tulare County several years ago.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Reduced yields of oil olives the year following the season when the fruit is harvested late—in January and February—were izidicated by studies made in Tulare County several years ago.
Bud moth on prunes: Parathion found to be highly toxic to pest of increasing economic importance
by Arthur D. Borden, Harold F. Madsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Haavy damage to the prune crops of a number of Santa Clara Valley orchards has been caused by the bud moth—Spilonola ocellana—during the past few seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Haavy damage to the prune crops of a number of Santa Clara Valley orchards has been caused by the bud moth—Spilonola ocellana—during the past few seasons.
Exocortis of trifoliate orange: Resembles shell bark of lemons and scaly bark of oranges
by H. S. Fawcett, L. J. Klotz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Exocortis—a shelling of the bark of the trifoliate orange—has been noted occasionaly for many years, but hitherto has been considered a minor manifestation on this stock.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Exocortis—a shelling of the bark of the trifoliate orange—has been noted occasionaly for many years, but hitherto has been considered a minor manifestation on this stock.
Cut flowers: 1947 value estimated to have exceeded total of twenty-five million dollars
by H. M. Butterfield
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Commercial cut flower production in 1947 in California's more important flower-growing counties was estimated to be in excess of $25,000,000.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Commercial cut flower production in 1947 in California's more important flower-growing counties was estimated to be in excess of $25,000,000.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.10

Irrigated pastures, forage and management
October 1948
Volume 2, Number 10

Research articles

Hidden fire losses: Uncontrolled fires costly to soils, plant cover, water and timber supplies
by Woodbridge Metcalf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Long time studies indicate that uncontrolled brush and forest fires profoundly affect soils, plant cover and water, as well as destroying man made structures and interfering with management plans for farms, forests and industries.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Long time studies indicate that uncontrolled brush and forest fires profoundly affect soils, plant cover and water, as well as destroying man made structures and interfering with management plans for farms, forests and industries.
Hard seeds in beans: Proper temperature and humidity during storage important for germination
by James F. Harrington
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Hard seeds have seed coats which retard the entrance of moisture into the seed. Seeds with hard coats are slow to swell. Since water is necessary for germination seeds do not germinate so long as they remain hard.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Hard seeds have seed coats which retard the entrance of moisture into the seed. Seeds with hard coats are slow to swell. Since water is necessary for germination seeds do not germinate so long as they remain hard.
Cattle grubs: Spray formula and application method recommended to reduce losses from pests
by Kenneth G. McKay, Deane P. Furman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cattle grubs cause an annual national loss of $50,000,000 to $100,000,000 to the livestock and dairy-industry according to estimates of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cattle grubs cause an annual national loss of $50,000,000 to $100,000,000 to the livestock and dairy-industry according to estimates of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Ketosis studied: Acetonemia and pregnancy disease dual problem in cows and in sheep
by Donald E. Jasper
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Symptoms of ketosis in dairy cows—in many cases—are almost identical to those of milk fever.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Symptoms of ketosis in dairy cows—in many cases—are almost identical to those of milk fever.
Irrigated pastures: Further studies planned on pasture varieties and management practices
by Maurice L. Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Irrigated pastures in California have increased to about 400,000 acres in approximately 15 years.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Irrigated pastures in California have increased to about 400,000 acres in approximately 15 years.
Mechanized sampling: Accurate description of growers' products by marketing and processing organizations possible
by A. M. Thym, Roy J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Accurate description of each lot of fruit and vegetables sent to marketing and processing organizations is necessary if each grower is to be paid what his product is worth.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Accurate description of each lot of fruit and vegetables sent to marketing and processing organizations is necessary if each grower is to be paid what his product is worth.
Crowded citrus orchards: Preliminary studies to determine effect of pruning practices in dense groves
by S. H. Cameron, R. W. Hodgson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Blocks of large orange trees now producing unsatisfactory crops—running largely to small sizes—are a problem in some of the older citrus growing districts of California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Blocks of large orange trees now producing unsatisfactory crops—running largely to small sizes—are a problem in some of the older citrus growing districts of California.
Nursery seedlings: Improved methods of production possible with control of damping-off disease
by Kenneth F. Baker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: New mechanized production techniques are being developed and adopted in the growing of seedlings because the damping-off disease now can be practically eliminated in commercial nurseries.
Not available – first paragraph follows: New mechanized production techniques are being developed and adopted in the growing of seedlings because the damping-off disease now can be practically eliminated in commercial nurseries.
Olive yields: Studies underway to determine causes and correction of irregular bearing
by H. T. Hartmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Reduced yields of oil olives the year following the season when the fruit is harvested late—in January and February—were izidicated by studies made in Tulare County several years ago.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Reduced yields of oil olives the year following the season when the fruit is harvested late—in January and February—were izidicated by studies made in Tulare County several years ago.
Bud moth on prunes: Parathion found to be highly toxic to pest of increasing economic importance
by Arthur D. Borden, Harold F. Madsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Haavy damage to the prune crops of a number of Santa Clara Valley orchards has been caused by the bud moth—Spilonola ocellana—during the past few seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Haavy damage to the prune crops of a number of Santa Clara Valley orchards has been caused by the bud moth—Spilonola ocellana—during the past few seasons.
Exocortis of trifoliate orange: Resembles shell bark of lemons and scaly bark of oranges
by H. S. Fawcett, L. J. Klotz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Exocortis—a shelling of the bark of the trifoliate orange—has been noted occasionaly for many years, but hitherto has been considered a minor manifestation on this stock.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Exocortis—a shelling of the bark of the trifoliate orange—has been noted occasionaly for many years, but hitherto has been considered a minor manifestation on this stock.
Cut flowers: 1947 value estimated to have exceeded total of twenty-five million dollars
by H. M. Butterfield
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Commercial cut flower production in 1947 in California's more important flower-growing counties was estimated to be in excess of $25,000,000.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Commercial cut flower production in 1947 in California's more important flower-growing counties was estimated to be in excess of $25,000,000.

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