California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.8

Cover:  Cabbage looper on seedling lettuce.
August 1975
Volume 29, Number 8

Research articles

Chemical loosening of sweet cherries as a harvest aid
by W. C. Micke, W. R. Schreader, J. T. Yeager, E. J. Roncoroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Mechanical harvesting of sweet cherries for brining is feasible in California but it has not been used extensively because of the difficulty of removing fruit from the tree. A loosening agent to reduce the force necessary to remove fruit would aid mechanical harvest.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Mechanical harvesting of sweet cherries for brining is feasible in California but it has not been used extensively because of the difficulty of removing fruit from the tree. A loosening agent to reduce the force necessary to remove fruit would aid mechanical harvest.
Control of the corn earworm on sweet corn in Southern California
by G. G. Kennedy, H. N. Nakakihara, E. R. Oatman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The corn earworm, Heriothis zea (Boddie), also known as he tomato fruitworm and cotton bollworm, is a serious pest on weet corn, tomato, cotton, and several other row crops grown commercially in California. Sweet corn, however, is the preferred host and, although the larvae also feed in the tassel in the whorl, the most significant damage results from feeding on kernels in the developing ear.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The corn earworm, Heriothis zea (Boddie), also known as he tomato fruitworm and cotton bollworm, is a serious pest on weet corn, tomato, cotton, and several other row crops grown commercially in California. Sweet corn, however, is the preferred host and, although the larvae also feed in the tassel in the whorl, the most significant damage results from feeding on kernels in the developing ear.
California's Citrus Variety Improvement Program
by Forrest Cress, Walter Reuther, E. C. Calavan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California citrus growers and nurserymen today can draw from a unique bank that should be of progressively increasing value to them in future years as its holdings grow.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California citrus growers and nurserymen today can draw from a unique bank that should be of progressively increasing value to them in future years as its holdings grow.
Cabbage looper control on seedling lettuce
by R. K. Sharma, N. C. Toscano, K. Kido, A. F. Van Maren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Imperial Valley, populations of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hubner) (photo) often build up on cotton and gradually spill into seedling lettuce in the fall. Looper infestations in lettuce are so heavy some years, that lettuce production would be in jeopardy unless efficiently controlled. Good insect control on lettuce is even more important because of increasing demands from the consumer for produce free of insect damage and debris.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Imperial Valley, populations of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hubner) (photo) often build up on cotton and gradually spill into seedling lettuce in the fall. Looper infestations in lettuce are so heavy some years, that lettuce production would be in jeopardy unless efficiently controlled. Good insect control on lettuce is even more important because of increasing demands from the consumer for produce free of insect damage and debris.
The economics of high density apple orchards in California
by A. D. Reed
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
SummaryHigh density plantings of apples have a definite potential under California conditions. The large development costs are more than offset by the early production of the high density plantings. The higher the interest rate, the more advantage there is to the high density plantings. Under the price and cost relationships used in this study, orchards with a 12 ton potential production were not profitable at any density of tree plantings.
Low rates of sulfur against powdery mildew on sugar beets in the Imperial Valley, California
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A single application of 15 pounds of sulfur 98 percent dust per acre gave 94 percent control of powdery mildew on sugar beets. One sulfur application will protect the crop for at least 4 weeks. If 15 pounds sulfur could be applied in commercial operations an estimated 1,625,000 pounds of sulfur could be saved each year.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.8

Cover:  Cabbage looper on seedling lettuce.
August 1975
Volume 29, Number 8

Research articles

Chemical loosening of sweet cherries as a harvest aid
by W. C. Micke, W. R. Schreader, J. T. Yeager, E. J. Roncoroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Mechanical harvesting of sweet cherries for brining is feasible in California but it has not been used extensively because of the difficulty of removing fruit from the tree. A loosening agent to reduce the force necessary to remove fruit would aid mechanical harvest.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Mechanical harvesting of sweet cherries for brining is feasible in California but it has not been used extensively because of the difficulty of removing fruit from the tree. A loosening agent to reduce the force necessary to remove fruit would aid mechanical harvest.
Control of the corn earworm on sweet corn in Southern California
by G. G. Kennedy, H. N. Nakakihara, E. R. Oatman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The corn earworm, Heriothis zea (Boddie), also known as he tomato fruitworm and cotton bollworm, is a serious pest on weet corn, tomato, cotton, and several other row crops grown commercially in California. Sweet corn, however, is the preferred host and, although the larvae also feed in the tassel in the whorl, the most significant damage results from feeding on kernels in the developing ear.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The corn earworm, Heriothis zea (Boddie), also known as he tomato fruitworm and cotton bollworm, is a serious pest on weet corn, tomato, cotton, and several other row crops grown commercially in California. Sweet corn, however, is the preferred host and, although the larvae also feed in the tassel in the whorl, the most significant damage results from feeding on kernels in the developing ear.
California's Citrus Variety Improvement Program
by Forrest Cress, Walter Reuther, E. C. Calavan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California citrus growers and nurserymen today can draw from a unique bank that should be of progressively increasing value to them in future years as its holdings grow.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California citrus growers and nurserymen today can draw from a unique bank that should be of progressively increasing value to them in future years as its holdings grow.
Cabbage looper control on seedling lettuce
by R. K. Sharma, N. C. Toscano, K. Kido, A. F. Van Maren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Imperial Valley, populations of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hubner) (photo) often build up on cotton and gradually spill into seedling lettuce in the fall. Looper infestations in lettuce are so heavy some years, that lettuce production would be in jeopardy unless efficiently controlled. Good insect control on lettuce is even more important because of increasing demands from the consumer for produce free of insect damage and debris.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Imperial Valley, populations of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hubner) (photo) often build up on cotton and gradually spill into seedling lettuce in the fall. Looper infestations in lettuce are so heavy some years, that lettuce production would be in jeopardy unless efficiently controlled. Good insect control on lettuce is even more important because of increasing demands from the consumer for produce free of insect damage and debris.
The economics of high density apple orchards in California
by A. D. Reed
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
SummaryHigh density plantings of apples have a definite potential under California conditions. The large development costs are more than offset by the early production of the high density plantings. The higher the interest rate, the more advantage there is to the high density plantings. Under the price and cost relationships used in this study, orchards with a 12 ton potential production were not profitable at any density of tree plantings.
Low rates of sulfur against powdery mildew on sugar beets in the Imperial Valley, California
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A single application of 15 pounds of sulfur 98 percent dust per acre gave 94 percent control of powdery mildew on sugar beets. One sulfur application will protect the crop for at least 4 weeks. If 15 pounds sulfur could be applied in commercial operations an estimated 1,625,000 pounds of sulfur could be saved each year.

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